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A Hartford Distributors building is seen behind a yellow police tape, in Manchester, Conn., Thursday, Aug. 5, 2010. Eight people were killed Tuesday when Omar Thornton opened fire after a disciplinary hearing at the beer distributorship in Manchester.
Steven Senne / Associated Press

According to a new study, there's been a rise in the number of fatal workplace shootings that are unrelated to robberies. Workplace shootings aren't uncommon, but they don't always make headlines unless multiple people are killed. 

Updated at 12:49 p.m. ET

The House of Representatives approved legislation renewing the Violence Against Women Act with new provisions that restrict gun ownership and expand transgender rights.

The National Rifle Association opposed the bill — putting GOP lawmakers in a tough position of voting against a measure protecting victims of domestic and sexual violence or opposing the politically powerful gun lobby.

The vote was 263 to 158, with 33 Republicans joining all but one Democrat to pass the measure. One GOP member voted present.

Elder Abuse Investigations More Than Doubled In Seven Years

Apr 3, 2019
Rita Pompano of West Haven says she was a victim of elder abuse in 2011, when her husband Ralph tormented her and beat her daily for seven months before she was able to escape with her son's help.
Carl Jordan Castro / C-HIT.org

State investigations of elder abuse, ranging from neglect to emotional abuse to physical abuse, more than doubled in Connecticut between 2011 and 2017, from 3,529 to 7,196.

Pascal Walschots / Creative Commons

We're outraged that wealthy parents illegally paid to get their kids into elite colleges they would otherwise not qualify to enter. Despite evidence to the contrary, we still want to believe that America is a meritocracy. It's not. And believing that it is might be bad for you.

New Zealand's cabinet has agreed "in principle" to tighten gun control laws, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said Monday, promising the changes will make the country safer. "We've unified, there are simply details to work through," she said.

Taylin Santiago, a New London High School student who identifies as Afro-Latino, testified in front of the Education Committee during a public hearing about H.B. 7082.
Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Do you remember high school history? The subject has the reputation of being “boring”, thick with names and dates that can be a chore to remember. But this hour we ask: How do the history lessons we learn in school shape the way we see the world around us?

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

For almost two decades no federal dollars have been allocated to researching the effects of gun violence. But there are moves afoot to change that. 

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

In a public hearing for several gun bills that lasted for more than eight hours, the testimonies of concerned mothers, proud gun owners, weary police chiefs, and drained doctors were put forth for the Judiciary Committee's consideration. 

How Are Lockdown Drills Affecting American Kids?

Feb 15, 2019
Adhiti Bandlamudi / North Carolina Public Radio - WUNC

Lockdown drills have become increasingly common in schools across the United States. Though drills differ from school to school, they usually require students to crouch in a corner of their darkened classroom, away from the door, and stay quiet until the teacher says it is okay to start talking again. Students start practicing these drills as early as pre-school, before they can truly understand what threat they are hiding from.

Updated at 5:32 p.m. ET

At 2:21 p.m. on Feb. 14, 2018, the first gunshots began to reverberate through the hallways of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, leaving 14 students and three educators dead; 17 others were wounded.

One year later at 10:17 a.m., silence descended on Florida's schools.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

As the one-year anniversary of the Parkland school shooting approaches, lawmakers and gun safety advocates reintroduced the Keep Americans Safe Act. Originally introduced after the 2017 Las Vegas mass shooting, the federal bill focuses on banning and classifying magazines that can hold more than 10 rounds of ammunition.

Lawmakers, law enforcement, and community organizers gathered in Bridgeport on Thursday to discuss youth violence.
Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

In the wake of a series of shootings involving teen shooters and victims, two Connecticut cities are outlining plans to address youth gun violence. 

While federal law prohibits those convicted of domestic violence offenses from buying a gun, the federal background check system is rife with loopholes.
Matthew Warlick for Guns & America

Stephanie Bond was married to her husband for almost 22 years before he called her into the master bedroom one afternoon in February 2010.

Lisa Hagen / WABE

While working as an orthopedic surgeon in Hawaii, Dr. Diane Payne had treated one person with a gunshot wound in three years. But when she moved to Atlanta in 2013, Payne said it was like treating gunshot victims was suddenly all she was doing.

Lori Mack / CT Public Radio

Police said a 12-year-old boy shot and killed in Bridgeport Tuesday night was an innocent bystander.

More than 80 handguns were turned in at the 10th Annual Capital Region Gun Buyback. Officers used the back of the tags to write down information about the guns, which aren't actually loaded.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

At the 10th Annual Capitol Region Gun Buyback Program, 137 guns were turned in within six hours, doubling last year's numbers. 

Lori Mack / CT Public Radio

ShotSpotter is a gunshot detection system, which uses a combination of sensors to determine the location of gunfire. Bridgeport has become the latest Connecticut city to roll out the technology. 

August Pelliccio / The Southern News, Southern Connecticut State University

David Hogg survived the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting in February and on Tuesday night, he spoke to an audience at Southern Connecticut State University as a part of the university's Social Justice Month. It’s one of many speaking engagements he’s done since the Parkland, Florida mass shooting and part of a new lifestyle Hogg's adjusting to.

Kathrine Holte

The repeated incidents of mass shootings are shocking. Yet, they're sanitized and abstract for most of us who haven't been directly touched by gun violence.

The response to mass shootings has become predictable: anguished adults, candlelight vigils, and photos and remembrances of the victims in happier times. It's never about the carnage or the lingering impact on survivors or their families, communities,  medical doctors, nurses and psychiatrists who care for them. 

Michael Avenatti, the attorney for adult film star Stormy Daniels in her legal battles with President Trump, was arrested Wednesday following an allegation of domestic violence, according to the Los Angeles Police Department.

Avenatti, who has denied the allegation, was booked Wednesday afternoon after police took a report on Tuesday of the alleged incident. He was released on $50,000 bail.

Updated 4:35 p.m. ET on Friday

The Borderline Bar & Grill could be counted on for a good time.

Updated at 3:10 p.m. ET

A lone gunman carrying a .45-caliber pistol killed 12 people at a country music bar in Thousand Oaks, Calif., late Wednesday, authorities say. When the shooting started, the Borderline Bar & Grill likely held hundreds of people, drawn by the weekly "College Country Night."

The dead include Sgt. Ron Helus, a 29-year veteran of law enforcement who went into the nightclub within minutes of receiving an emergency call. As many as 15 people inside the bar were injured, and one person had a minor gunshot wound.

The suspect in Saturday's Tree of Life Synagogue shooting walked into a federal courtroom in Pittsburgh on Thursday and pleaded not guilty to all 44 counts against him. The case is set for a jury trial and could result in the death penalty.

A day earlier, a federal grand jury charged Robert Bowers of Baldwin, Pa., with the murder of 11 people, as well as with hate crimes.

Updated 2:00 p.m. ET

A large crowd of Jewish and non-Jewish mourners gathered Tuesday under a vaulted white ceiling, tall chandeliers and stained glass windows inside Pittsburgh's Rodef Shalom to honor Cecil and David Rosenthal. At 59 and 54, the brothers were two of the youngest victims and are among the first of the 11 victims of the shooting at Tree of Life synagogue to be laid to rest.

After a gunman opened fire at a synagogue in Pittsburgh on Saturday, killing at least 11 and wounding others in what federal prosecutors are calling a hate crime, faith leaders around the country are re-examining security tactics while trying to ensure their religious institutions remain accessible community centers.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

Eleven are dead and six others injured after a gunman opened fire Saturday inside a Pittsburgh synagogue.

What drove this violent act? And how have members of the interfaith community responded in its aftermath? This hour, we find out and we also hear from you. 

Rabbi Michael Farbman prepares for Sunday School in Orange, Connecticut the day after the Tree of Life synagogue shooting in Pittsburgh.
Credit: Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Jewish congregations around Connecticut struggled this weekend to absorb the news out of Pittsburgh. Several communities held candlelight vigils to remember those killed in a mass shooting at the Tree of Life synagogue. 

Liam James Doyle / NPR

The Justice Department is holding a press conference about the wave of suspicious packages that have been sent to political enemies of President Trump this week. A suspect has been arrested. 

Updated at 9:19 p.m. ET

The Justice Department charged a Florida man on Friday in connection with a wave of improvised explosive devices sent to political critics of President Trump.

Cesar Altieri Sayoc, 56, is facing five federal charges after he was arrested in Plantation, Fla., following a national investigation. He faces a potential total of 48 years in prison.

Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET

Federal authorities expanded their nationwide search on Thursday for the person who sent a wave of suspected explosive devices to political nemeses of President Trump.

Ten devices addressed to eight targets have been intercepted or discovered, but no one has been hurt. It isn't clear whether or not the attack is over; the FBI said it can't rule out that more suspicious packages might still be moving through the mail.

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