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Former Boston Red Sox slugger David Ortiz was shot in the back Sunday at an outdoor bar in the Dominican capital of Santo Domingo. He was reportedly in stable condition after undergoing surgery.

Ortiz, a native of the Dominican Republic, was at the bar in the capital at about 8:50 p.m. when a man on a motorcycle approached and shot him from behind, according to Dominican National Police Director Ney Aldrin Bautista Almonte.

Ortiz's father, Leo Ortiz, told local reporters that his son, 43, was "fine" after surgery and that the bullet did not hit any vital organs.

Guns Make Some Women Feel Safe, From What?

Jun 7, 2019
Janet Paulsen poses for a portrait at her Acworth, Georgia home on Sunday April 21, 2019. Her estranged husband shot and paralyzed her in 2015.
Bita Honarvar / WABE

At this year’s National Rifle Association annual meeting, President Donald Trump invited some special guests on stage. The first was a young mother from Virginia, April Evans.

“One night in 2015 she was alone with her two-year-old daughter when an intruder broke into her home violently,” said Trump.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The intentional burning of New Haven's Diyanet Mosque during Ramadan prompted community members of all faiths to gather at the site for a vigil Thursday night. The mosque went up in flames on Sunday afternoon, sending waves of concern, anger, and heartbreak throughout the community.

Carlos Mejia / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

Two recent police shootings in Connecticut highlight, once again, tensions between police and the public.

As lawmakers debate ways to hold police accountable, residents wrestle with trusting law enforcement. What issues need be addressed to mend relationships and build stronger communities?

This hour, we listen back to a conversation we hosted with community members at the Arroyo Recreation Center at Pope Park in Hartford.

More guns are being stolen out of cars in America, particularly in states that have made it easier for people to carry firearms on the road.

There are no reliable national numbers, but an NPR survey of a sampling of police departments reveals steady increases in reports of guns stolen from vehicles.

In Atlanta, the number rose to 1,021 in 2018 from 439 in 2009.

In St. Louis, it increased to 597 from 200 in the same period.

Updated May 8 at 1:15 a.m. ET

Officials say one student is dead and eight students were injured in a shooting at a public charter school in Highlands Ranch, Colo., a suburb south of Denver.

In a tweet, the Douglas County Sheriff's Office said the deceased was an 18-year-old student at the STEM School.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

As the repercussions from two police shootings in Connecticut continue to reverberate, municipal governments in Hamden and in Wethersfield attempted Monday to address the incidents. But neither ended the night by taking any action.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The release of dashcam and surveillance footage on May 3rd of a police shooting in Wethersfield spurred a range of reactions. For friends and supporters of Anthony Jose "Chulo" Vega Cruz, the 18-year-old who later died from his injuries, it was a mix of sadness and outrage.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Hartford police have arrested a man suspected of shooting and killing 16-year-old Felipe Lopez on April 24. Isaiah Benitez, 22, has been charged with murder and carrying a pistol without a permit. 

In Parts Of Cleveland, You Don't Call 911. You Call Tonto

Apr 29, 2019
Gregory Terrell, Tonto, is a violence interrupter in Cleveland, Ohio. He spends his days driving around neighborhoods on the city's east side, speaking with residents, in the hopes that when there is gun violence, he can help.
Matt Richmond / ideastream

Gregory Terrell is a volunteer violence interrupter in Cleveland, Ohio. He runs a non-profit called Society for Nonviolent Change and works mostly in the Central neighborhood on Cleveland’s East Side. Everyone who knows him calls him Tonto.

Marco Verch / Creative Commons

It's just Colin and your calls.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Two recent officer-involved shootings have shaken communities across Connecticut.  This hour, we take a look at these two stories. We hear from Connecticut Public Radio reporters who’ve been on the ground in New Haven and Wethersfield.

We ask a lawmaker: Does Connecticut have in place strong enough laws for police accountability? And we take a look at de-escalation training for police.  How can this training serve officers in the heat of the moment?

Americans Are Killing Romantic Partners More Often, With Guns

Apr 26, 2019
Trinity Kubassek / Pexels

After decades of decline, the rate of Americans killing their intimate partners has seen “a sharp increase” in recent years. Data shows that uptick is exclusively due to gun-related murders.

Kittrell Lauray, 18, center, a family friend, holds up a "Justice for Chulo" banner during Thursday's march down Silas Deane Highway in Wethersfield. Police blocked off the road for about two hours.
Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

The shooting death of 18-year-old Anthony Jose "Chulo" Vega Cruz by a Wethersfield police officer prompted protesters to take to the streets of Hartford and Wethersfield Thursday night.

Updated at 1:11 a.m. ET Tuesday:

The Sri Lankan government has blamed the National Thowfeek Jamaath, a little-known Muslim militant group, for the coordinated attacks on churches and hotels that rocked the island nation on Easter Sunday.

Sri Lankan Health Minister Rajitha Senaratne says the small group was aided by an international network.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

The call that came during the wee hours of the morning of March 24 was from a man in Enfield. He said he wanted to burn the Muhammad Islamic Center of Greater Hartford, using the n-word and other slurs against the members of the mosque that serves African-American, refugee, and immigrant Muslims.

A Hartford Distributors building is seen behind a yellow police tape, in Manchester, Conn., Thursday, Aug. 5, 2010. Eight people were killed Tuesday when Omar Thornton opened fire after a disciplinary hearing at the beer distributorship in Manchester.
Steven Senne / Associated Press

According to a new study, there's been a rise in the number of fatal workplace shootings that are unrelated to robberies. Workplace shootings aren't uncommon, but they don't always make headlines unless multiple people are killed. 

Updated at 12:49 p.m. ET

The House of Representatives approved legislation renewing the Violence Against Women Act with new provisions that restrict gun ownership and expand transgender rights.

The National Rifle Association opposed the bill — putting GOP lawmakers in a tough position of voting against a measure protecting victims of domestic and sexual violence or opposing the politically powerful gun lobby.

The vote was 263 to 158, with 33 Republicans joining all but one Democrat to pass the measure. One GOP member voted present.

Elder Abuse Investigations More Than Doubled In Seven Years

Apr 3, 2019
Rita Pompano of West Haven says she was a victim of elder abuse in 2011, when her husband Ralph tormented her and beat her daily for seven months before she was able to escape with her son's help.
Carl Jordan Castro / C-HIT.org

State investigations of elder abuse, ranging from neglect to emotional abuse to physical abuse, more than doubled in Connecticut between 2011 and 2017, from 3,529 to 7,196.

Pascal Walschots / Creative Commons

We're outraged that wealthy parents illegally paid to get their kids into elite colleges they would otherwise not qualify to enter. Despite evidence to the contrary, we still want to believe that America is a meritocracy. It's not. And believing that it is might be bad for you.

New Zealand's cabinet has agreed "in principle" to tighten gun control laws, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said Monday, promising the changes will make the country safer. "We've unified, there are simply details to work through," she said.

Taylin Santiago, a New London High School student who identifies as Afro-Latino, testified in front of the Education Committee during a public hearing about H.B. 7082.
Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Do you remember high school history? The subject has the reputation of being “boring”, thick with names and dates that can be a chore to remember. But this hour we ask: How do the history lessons we learn in school shape the way we see the world around us?

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

For almost two decades no federal dollars have been allocated to researching the effects of gun violence. But there are moves afoot to change that. 

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

In a public hearing for several gun bills that lasted for more than eight hours, the testimonies of concerned mothers, proud gun owners, weary police chiefs, and drained doctors were put forth for the Judiciary Committee's consideration. 

How Are Lockdown Drills Affecting American Kids?

Feb 15, 2019
Adhiti Bandlamudi / North Carolina Public Radio - WUNC

Lockdown drills have become increasingly common in schools across the United States. Though drills differ from school to school, they usually require students to crouch in a corner of their darkened classroom, away from the door, and stay quiet until the teacher says it is okay to start talking again. Students start practicing these drills as early as pre-school, before they can truly understand what threat they are hiding from.

Updated at 5:32 p.m. ET

At 2:21 p.m. on Feb. 14, 2018, the first gunshots began to reverberate through the hallways of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, leaving 14 students and three educators dead; 17 others were wounded.

One year later at 10:17 a.m., silence descended on Florida's schools.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

As the one-year anniversary of the Parkland school shooting approaches, lawmakers and gun safety advocates reintroduced the Keep Americans Safe Act. Originally introduced after the 2017 Las Vegas mass shooting, the federal bill focuses on banning and classifying magazines that can hold more than 10 rounds of ammunition.

Lawmakers, law enforcement, and community organizers gathered in Bridgeport on Thursday to discuss youth violence.
Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

In the wake of a series of shootings involving teen shooters and victims, two Connecticut cities are outlining plans to address youth gun violence. 

While federal law prohibits those convicted of domestic violence offenses from buying a gun, the federal background check system is rife with loopholes.
Matthew Warlick for Guns & America

Stephanie Bond was married to her husband for almost 22 years before he called her into the master bedroom one afternoon in February 2010.

Lisa Hagen / WABE

While working as an orthopedic surgeon in Hawaii, Dr. Diane Payne had treated one person with a gunshot wound in three years. But when she moved to Atlanta in 2013, Payne said it was like treating gunshot victims was suddenly all she was doing.

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