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A memorial takes shape on a telephone pole near the site where 26-year-old Yale forestry graduate student Kevin Jiang was shot and killed in the Goatville section of New Haven’s East Rock neighborhood.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Earlier this month a Yale graduate student was murdered in New Haven’s East Rock neighborhood, leading to widespread media coverage.

This hour, we ask: why do some shootings get media attention while others do not? We take a look at the way race and privilege shape gun violence coverage.

And we talk with journalists and community members. What trends have you noticed in news coverage of violent crime?

We, The Dog

Jan 29, 2021
Photos: Quino Al (background), Niclas Moser (dog),  ActionVance (human) via Unsplash. Illustration by Chion Wolf.


What do the ways we train our dogs say about us?

You’ll hear about how dogs are trained to search and rescue, dating back to some of our earliest wars. How they’ve been trained by authority figures for hundreds of years to bite - and hold - and sometimes kill. And how the street dogs of Moscow were trained to fly into space - even though it meant their certain doom.

A Connecticut man has been charged with assaulting an officer during the breach of the U.S. Capitol in an incident captured on video and shared widely on social media.

Police have arrested two more people near security checkpoints in Washington, D.C., where security is heightened over concerns about potential violence on fast-approaching Inauguration Day.

Early Sunday morning, a 22-year-old Virginia man carrying a firearm, three high-capacity magazines and 37 rounds of unregistered ammunition was arrested near Capitol Hill.

Trump supporters try to break through a police barrier, Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, at the Capitol in Washington.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

The U.S. Capitol has seen countless protests and a number of violent incidents over its two centuries. But what we observed last week, when a mob of President Trump’s supporters stormed the Capitol intent on stopping the count of electoral votes, has been called unprecedented.

Image of the U.S. Capitol Building
Scazon / Creative Commons

President Trump has been impeached by the House of Representatives again, making him the first president in U.S. history to be impeached twice. With just days before President-Elect Joe Biden’s inauguration, what happens next?

We check in with impeachment legal expert Ross Garber.

We also talk with The New York Times Interpreter columnist Amanda Taub. What lessons can we take from attacks on democracies globally to better understand our current moment?

Updated at 6:43 p.m. ET

One day after a Christmas bombing in downtown Nashville, Tenn., damaged dozens of buildings over several blocks and injured at least three people, police are working with federal authorities to find the perpetrator.

A Wisconsin court commissioner on Monday set bail at $2 million for Kyle Rittenhouse, the 17-year-old accused of killing protesters in Kenosha, in his first court appearance in the state after being extradited from Illinois last week.

Rittenhouse is accused of fatally shooting two demonstrators and injuring a third during protests on Aug. 25 that followed the shooting of Jacob Blake, a Black man who was shot several times at close range by Kenosha police and is now paralyzed.

Updated at 1:55 p.m. ET

Gunmen disguised as policemen stormed Kabul University in the Afghan capital in an hours-long assault on Monday, killing at least 19 people and wounding 22 more, including students who jumped out of windows to flee the attackers. It is the second attack on a learning center in Kabul in recent days, and comes amid a spike in violence across the country.

Members of a Quaker congregation in Maryland are so concerned that President Trump will prematurely declare victory when states are still counting ballots — a process that could take days — that they are ready to take to the streets in nonviolent resistance.

They say such a scenario would amount to a "coup" — even if it involves legal fights and not military action.

Blurred image of police car lights
WCN 24/7 / Flickr

Connecticut’s capital city is experiencing another public health crisis amidst the pandemic -- an epidemic of gun violence.

There have been more than 50 shootings in Hartford since September.

This hour, we talk about what’s behind this disturbing rise in violence, and how to address it. Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin joins us and we hear from anti-violence advocates.

How should we make sense of a rise in shootings through a public health lens? We hear from an expert who used to lead the CDC’s national injury prevention center.

Grieving Murdered Children During A Pandemic

Oct 12, 2020

Marion Bailey lost her grandson Javaun D. Graves five years ago. He was murdered in Durham, North Carolina.

“I felt like I had a hole in my stomach,” Bailey said. “And that I didn’t think it would ever be sealed again. I just felt like part of me was missing, it was gone.”

She says her faith was the only thing that pulled her through after Graves was shot while standing next to a vehicle and talking to his girlfriend.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

As the weather gets colder and more students go back to school, what do the next steps in reopening Connecticut look like? Will Connecticut need to even scale back reopening? This hour, Governor Lamont calls into the show to answer our questions and yours.  

Tenbeete Solomon

Bill Moore was 24 when police say he fired the bullets that would kill one 17-year-old and injure another.

He grew up in Hartford, Connecticut, and would hang out with friends who lived in the apartment building on Park Street that would eventually become a crime scene.

DavidsonScott15 / Creative Commons

Hartford Police have identified a man who was killed in a shooting as city resident Kennedy Burgess, 28. He was shot during the second of two incidents in the city Monday night. Mayor Luke Bronin said Tuesday that he thinks the coronavirus crisis is playing a role in the uptick in violence in Hartford.

Today, you’re gonna hear from three people who had close encounters with wild animals - and have the scars to prove it.

You’ll hear how - and if - any of these people felt defined by their experiences, and what sense they’ve made out of their encounters. Plus, you’ll hear from a wildlife expert about what animals you should be careful to keep away from here in New England.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

The worldwide demonstrations of the last two weeks have been in protest of police brutality. And yet, they have delivered images from across the U.S. of police acting brutally against unarmed people in the midst of the protests. 

domestic violence shelter t-shirts
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A nonprofit that houses victims of domestic violence is faced with a need it characterized as “relentless.” That need comes at a time when the potential for abuse increases with families staying at home to combat the spread of coronavirus.

guns
Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut’s red flag law could see significant changes through a new bill that would update a statute that’s been on the books since 1999. 

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

A state bill that would levy a 35% excise tax on ammunition purchases drew a large crowd at a public hearing at the state Capitol Thursday. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Lori Jackson feared for her life, so she got a temporary restraining order against her husband. But he was still able to legally buy a handgun, which he used to kill Jackson.

This hour, we talk about the legal gaps that allow some domestic abusers to purchase firearms.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Mothers United Against Violence held a vigil for another victim of gun violence in Hartford Tuesday night. The fatal shooting of Marquis Treadwell over the weekend marks the city’s fourth homicide of 2020.

Despite the rain, members of the community and Treadwell’s family gathered outside the Majestic Lounge on Franklin Avenue.

ammunition
Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

The Connecticut General Assembly will consider a proposal this legislative session that would impose an excise tax on ammunition. Revenue from the tax would support gun violence prevention efforts in affected communities.

Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

Daryl McGraw says he remembers when he was choked and tased by a police officer. He also remembers the years of his life that he was addicted to drugs -- and the 10 years he spent in and out of prison for drug-related offenses. Now he’s the co-chair of the state’s Police Transparency and Accountability Task Force.

The committee was created during the last legislative session with the passage of Public Act 19-90 in July 2019, An Act Concerning the Use of Force and Pursuits by Police and Increasing Police Accountability and Transparency.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Three fatal shootings by police officers in Connecticut have occurred in the early weeks of 2020. In light of these incidents, State Sen. Gary Winfield said lawmakers have an opportunity to address police use of force in the upcoming legislative session.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

A lawsuit by families of victims of the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School has the potential to significantly change what the world knows about how the gun industry thinks and operates. After years of delays, the lawsuit is moving forward, which may force the gun industry to make public what it considers private.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A recent stabbing at a Hanukkah gathering in New York has local leaders in the Jewish community worrying about acts of anti-Semitism taking place in Connecticut.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Lawmakers and state leaders joined members of the Jewish community at a vigil in West Hartford Monday evening, in solidarity with the victims of a stabbing attack in New York.

Updated at 3:16 p.m. ET

Federal prosecutors in New York have filed hate crime charges against the man accused of carrying out a stabbing rampage north of New York City over the weekend that wounded five people as they celebrated Hanukkah.

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

New Haven saw an uptick in violent crime in 2019, according to year-end statistics.

Police Chief Tony Reyes said violent crime is up, particularly shooting incidents, but he stressed that New Haven remains a safe city. Officers broke down the numbers and described the challenges and strategies by neighborhood during a recent meeting at police headquarters. Statistics showed 74 nonfatal shooting victims as of Dec. 15 -- the highest number since 2012.

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