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Courtesy the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station

An invasive plant has been reported in five more eastern Connecticut towns. The mile-a-minute vine spreads quickly, and chokes out native vegetation.

Joining us to talk about the mile-a-minute vine is Donna Ellis. She is a Senior Extension Educator at the University of Connecticut, and she is Co-Chair of the Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.

Sam Pickering "Doesn't Have An Answer"

Sep 14, 2012
Wikimedia Commons

Remember the 1989 Robin Williams movie “Dead Poet’s society?” An unorthodox and inspirational teacher takes on the establishment culture of a prestigious boy’s school.

The real-life teacher who helped inspire that character has been teaching literature at UConn since 1978. Sam Pickering told us that he doesn’t really think much about the movie. He told us that he “only saw it once” and even missed parts of it.

Calhoun Retires

Sep 13, 2012

UConn men's basketball coach Jim Calhoun has retired after 26 years and three NCAA championships.  As WNPR's Jeff Cohen reports, Calhoun says this is the right time to move on. 

Senator Who?

Jul 30, 2012

HARTFORD, CT - Some politicians believe that young people, between the ages of 18 and 26, don't care about politics. Senator Grump C. Mudgeon is one of those politicans. He claims that young people don't watch the news, pick up newspapers, or even register to vote.

The CPBN Media Lab went out in search of young people at the University of Hartford and Trinity College. After showing people Grump's message, which urges youth to avoid the polls, we filmed their reactions. "Who is this?" asked Andre Dixon, former UCONN student.

erix!

The American Medical Association has adopted the recommendations of a report that links health problems, including cancer, to exposure to artificial light. Joining us is one of the co-authors of the report, and perhaps the first scientist to make this link, is Dr. Richard Stevens, professor in the University of Connecticut School of Medicine Department of Community Medicine and Health Care. 

Chion Wolf

A quick rundown of this week's Nose topics:

Courtesy of Flickr CC by Senate Democrats

Coach Geno Auriemma is talking about UConn's recent decision to end its broadcast partnership with CPTV. The public television station had aired women's basketball games for eighteen seasons.  WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil reports

Last year, Connecticut’s small farms braced themselves against some extraordinary weather, including Tropical Storm Irene and the October snowfall. And now, after a warm, dry winter, they may be facing an even worse threat in the form of damaging agricultural pests. WNPR’s Jan Ellen Spiegel reports.

“They are coming up, there are some raspberries there.”

Adult Friendships

Apr 12, 2012
edenpictures

Facebook has redefined the word “friend.” But what if you’re looking for real friends - where would you begin?

It seems natural for adults, after high school or college, to struggle with new patterns of adult relationships.

When the weekend arrives, maybe we find ourselves a little bit at a loss for where to go to find the people we want to hang out with, people who aren't work colleagues or family members.

Governor Dannel Malloy recently committed to investing 291 million of the state’s dollars in a new genomic research facility on the Farmington campus at the University of Connecticut. WNPR’s Neena Satija reports on what the center can do for medicine and jobs in the state.

STEM Series: Improving STEM Education in College

Feb 15, 2012
Neena Satija

Connecticut employers are saying that students in the state aren't coming into the workforce with the skills they need in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math.  In part, that's because more than half of students who enter college thinking about a science major end up leaving the sciences before they graduate.  In the third segment of our series on STEM education in Connecticut, WNPR’s Neena Satija reports on  efforts to change that.

Copepodo / Creative Commons

Veterans who are students at the University of Connecticut at Storrs will come back from winter break to a space just for them. WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil explains

It's called OASIS or Operation Academic Support for Incoming Servicemembers. The idea goes back to 2007 when the state Department of Veterans Affairs decided servicemembers who enrolled in college needed a place on campus where they could seek out support as they transitioned back to civilian life.

Courtesy of Flickr CC by Copepodo

Veterans who are students at the University of Connecticut at Storrs will come back from winter break to a space just for them. It's called OASIS, or Operation Academic Support for Incoming Servicemembers.

The idea goes back to 2007, when the state Department of Veterans Affairs decided servicemembers who enrolled in college needed a place on campus where they could seek out support as they transitioned back to civilian life.

UConn Approves Tuition Hike Over Four Years

Dec 20, 2011
Chion Wolf / WNPR

The University of Connecticut announced yesterday that it’s raising tuition starting in 2013. Yearly increases thru 2016 will be 6 percent, 6.3 percent, 6.5 percent and 6.8 percent...nearly doubling the cost of attending UConn in less than 12 years. Tuition and fees for an in-state student is currently $10,670. Under this plan, it could grow to $13,130 by 2016.

A University of Connecticut professor has been studying two treatment therapies for post traumatic stress disorder. The study focuses on the military community which sees a disproportionate number of PTSD cases.

UConn Docs Offer New Shoes, and Healthy Feet

Nov 24, 2011
Uma Ramiah

Each year, the New England Musculoskeletal Institute at the University of Connecticut  provides free foot health screenings -- and new shoes -- for the homeless.

Dr. Vinayak Sathe is inspecting ... a foot.

"Can you move your ankle up and down? Good. And can you move it sideways? So just swelling right? And how far up does it go, like up to here?"

Jeremy Pollack.

Recent college graduates are finding it difficult to get a job at a time when the national unemployment rate remains stagnant at nine percent. But imagine if you're a veteran just back from serving overseas. You're trying to find employment while carrying the physical and mental effects of war. A consortium of schools including the University of Connecticut are helping turn disabled veterans into small business-owners. As part of WNPR's Coming Home Project, Lucy Nalpathanchil introduces us to a entrepreneurship 'bootcamp'.

Yesterday two Big East schools, Pittsburgh and Syracuse were accepted into rival league the Atlantic Coast Conference. This has schools scrambling to determine the future of their sports programs, including UConn, which according to some sources is already in discussions with the ACC. Joining us to talk about this shake up is Hartford Courant sports writer Dom Amore.

Teaching About 9/11

Sep 9, 2011
Diane Orson

As the nation prepares to commemorate the tenth anniversary of September 11th,  Connecticut schools are holding special assemblies and classroom discussions. We report on some of the challenges facing educators who teach students about 9/11, and the larger issues that surround the historic event.

UConn Athletics In Transition

Aug 23, 2011
Photo by Avinash Kunnath (Flickr)

We talk with Hartford Courant columnist Jeff Jacobs about the “resignation” of UConn athletic director Jeff Hathaway. He is leaving the post he's had since 2003. Although the athletics program has enjoyed success, Hathaway was criticized for low attendance and fundraising.

The move may indicate new President Susan Herbst's commitment to revamping the school's athletic program. Jacobs praised Herbst's handling of the situation:

Veterans are among college students heading back to class this fall. At the University of Connecticut, more than 400 students have military experience. They're considered non-traditional students given the fact many enroll after multiple deployments. WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil reports on one way campuses are working to accommodate their needs. 

The New Cartography

Jun 27, 2011
Christine Rondeau, Creative Commons

Since the days of great explorers, maps have served a very simple purpose, getting us from point A to point B (without falling off the edge of the earth, of course). 

But with the advent of digital mapping technologies, the form, function and potential of maps has been revolutionized.

courtesy eGen

Connecticut would like to reinvent itself as the next Silicon Valley. Some economic development experts say our future lies with the state’s small technology companies. If that’s to become a reality, Connecticut’s universities will have to be a key part of the change. A conference today at UConn aims to show the way. 

Christine Zenino

There's something Shakesperean about Jim Calhoun. I'm just never sure which play he's in. Henry V? Lear? Richard III?

On Monday night, he was Henry V, leading his troops into battle. "We few, we happy few, we band of brothers," indeed. But since 2008, he has auditioned for other roles. Sometimes exploding like Lear and sometimes appearing to connive like Richard.

Chion Wolf

Before we begin, Clarence, the WNPR puppet, would like to address the New Britain puppet thieves.

You probably think an International Puppetry Conference at UConn -- there is one this weekend -- would be full of cute stuff, right?

UConn President Susan Herbst

Mar 22, 2011
Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Susan Herbst is the new President of the University of Connecticut.  She says the state needs a school it can “brag on.”

Coming from the University System of Georgia, she says that’s a “Southern” code phrase for making UConn a flagship University in the mold of Michigan or Berkeley - an internationally recognized research center that has a powerful “academic brand.”

Out in Connecticut: Fleurette King

Oct 29, 2010

Fleurette King is the director of the Rainbow Center at the University of Connecticut in Storrs. The mission of the Rainbow Center is to serve the diversity of the UConn Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Questioning, and Allied community and to provide resources and services to the wider community of students, faculty, staff, and local residents.

A prominent UConn law professor has been tapped to advise the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, founded under the Dodd-Frank financial reform act. Patricia McCoy will be working on mortgages. McCoy is the director of UConn law school’s Insurance Law Center and an expert on consumer finance issues. She’s been a prominent commentator on the foreclosure crisis, and an advocate of protecting the rights of homeowners who were the victims of predatory lending.

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