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Updated at 5:48 p.m. ET

The Federal Aviation Administration says it is temporarily grounding all Boeing 737 Max aircraft operated by U.S. airlines or in U.S. territory.

The announcement Wednesday afternoon follows decisions by many other countries to ground the planes after 157 people died in Sunday's crash of an Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max 8.

As countries worldwide continue to ground their Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft, aviation officials in the U.S. have been hesitant to follow suit.

The Federal Aviation Administration says there is "no basis to order the grounding of the aircraft." That's according to a statement Tuesday evening from Daniel Elwell, the acting FAA administrator.

Grendelkhan / Wikimedia Commons

What would you do with all that time if you didn't have to drive during your daily commute?

This hour: like it or not, autonomous vehicles (AVs) will be a major part of our not-too-distant transportation future. We take a look at some of the promises and challenges of automating vehicles and ask what they will mean for the cities of our future.

Updated at 4:30 a.m. ET Monday

China is grounding all Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft in the country after Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crashed Sunday morning, killing everyone on board, including eight Chinese nationals, according to reports.

The plane, which crashed shortly after takeoff from Addis Ababa, had 149 passengers and eight crew members on board, the airline said. There were no survivors.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Governor Ned Lamont is leaning toward tolling of all vehicles in Connecticut, rather than concentrating on trucks as he said during the campaign.

WBZ-TV

Hundreds are expected to turn out to the state Capitol Wednesday for a public hearing on Gov. Ned Lamont's bill to install electronic tolls on Connecticut highways.

But even those who favor tolls may not support another bill to create a transportation authority. Some think it would make state legislators less accountable when it comes to setting toll rates and deciding where toll gantries will be located.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

In a wide-ranging interview with Connecticut Public Radio, Governor Ned Lamont Monday touted some of his policy and personnel changes in the crucial areas of transportation and economic development.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

It's been nearly two months since Ned Lamont was sworn in as Connecticut's 89th governor. 

Elements of his budget proposal, released last month, are being opposed by many segments of the state's population.

Kris Notaro / Creative Commons

An estimated 20 percent of Americans reside in rural communities. What are the needs of this population? And to what extent are those needs being met? This hour, we take a closer look.

We also sit down with Anne Torsiglieri, whose one-woman show "A" Train comes to Hartford this week. 

Matt O'Brien / AP

Last June, Rhode Island kicked off the nation’s first statewide truck-only tolling program, at two spots on Interstate 95, and so far, it’s been successful. This year, it plans to expand to ten more locations: tolling large tractor trailers. Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont is looking at mimicking the plan in his state. But the trucking industry is challenging the arrangement in federal court.

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

It was 1983. Toll booths in Connecticut had already experienced decades of problems like accidents and traffic jams.

And then, a truck slammed into a car waiting at the Stratford toll plaza on Interstate 95.

Lamont Reverses Himself, Will Offer Plan To Toll Cars And Trucks

Feb 16, 2019
In this Aug. 22, 2016 file photo, cars pass under toll sensor gantries hanging over the Massachusetts Turnpike in Newton, Mass.
Elise Amendola / Associated Press

Gov. Ned Lamont reversed himself Saturday, announcing he will propose electronic tolling on cars as well as trucks when he unveils his first state budget Wednesday.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Advocates across Connecticut called for increased access to public transportation Monday, February 4.

At the Southeast Area Transit center in Norwich, Ariana Woody, the president of the NAACP chapter in Norwich, said public transit is a civil right.

As someone who’s used public transportation her entire life, Woody said that service in the SEAT district could be improved, particularly when buses run -- and when they don't.

Updated at 5:35 p.m. ET

Travelers experienced significant flight delays at New York's LaGuardia Airport and at New Jersey's Newark Liberty International Airport on Friday due to a shortage of air traffic control center workers. Philadelphia International Airport also saw slight staffing-related delays.

This station in Berlin is one of the stops that Amtrak and CTrail trains make on the Hartford line route between Springfield and New Haven.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The state of Connecticut and Amtrak do not have a shared agreement that makes tickets bought through the rail giant and ones purchased by local students and CTrail passengers equal.

Neena Satija

Senator Richard Blumenthal has condemned Metro-North and many other railroads for failing to implement Positive Train Control safety technology. Only four of more than 40 railroads have installed the technology which can control train speeds and prevent collisions and derailments in the event of human error. 

Amar Batra / Connecticut Public Radio

It's the New Year and, for Ned Lamont, that means there is only one week left to prepare for the day he takes over the reins of state government.

Lamont has signaled a willingness to be a consensus-builder, someone who brings together opposing viewpoints to reach effective solutions. But does he have the backbone to stand firm during the budget process when groups that propelled him into office present him with wish-lists the state can't readily afford?

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut passengers without certain train tickets continue to experience second-class treatment on Amtrak trains servicing the Hartford Line.

Connecticut Historical Society

Bicycles helped inspire modern cars, paved roads...even airplanes! But did you know they were also an inspiration for the women's movement?

This hour we take a look back in time at the origins of the bicycle, including innovation that happened right here in Connecticut. We find out the history of how this vehicle spurred social change and helped empower women to break through gender barriers a little more than a century ago.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Non-Amtrak riders continue to be shut out because of capacity issues, despite having valid tickets, on Hartford Line trains serviced in Connecticut by Amtrak.

Courtesy Amy Blumenreder

Much of Connecticut ground to a halt Thursday evening, as drivers and state crews seemed caught unaware by the first snow of the winter.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal has stepped into the controversy over inadequate train service on the Hartford line. He’s demanding answers from Amtrak over capacity issues on the new commuter line.

Peteg913 / Creative Commons

The power went out at Bradley airport twice on Monday morning.

The emergency personnel were shown points of entry so that they could reach passengers in a manner that's quick but safe. That included a demonstration of how to use fire axes to get into the train.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Hartford firefighters and other area first responders went through a simulation of a head-on train collision Saturday.

A member the Stamford branch of the Amalgamated Transit Union leaves a pamphlet behind at a residence in Glenbrook section of town as part of an effort by ATU workers on October 28, 2018 to spread the word about the lockbox ballot question.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

One of the two questions featured on statewide ballots will give Connecticut voters the chance to decide if money earmarked for transportation should be kept in a lockbox.

Amar Batra / Connecticut Public Radio

A group of civil engineers gathered in Hartford Tuesday to urge voters approve a ballot question that would establish a lockbox for transportation money. It’s a last-minute push that comes as a new report says the state’s roads and bridges are in need of major investment.

Updated at 7:15 a.m. ET

An Indonesian airliner carrying 189 passengers and crew has crashed into the Java Sea minutes after takeoff from Jakarta. The Indonesian Ministry of Transportation confirms it has found the wreckage of the Lion Air jet — a Boeing 737 MAX 8 that was delivered to the company in August.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A seat on the 4:32 p.m. train out of Hartford’s union station is emerging as the most coveted seat on the CTrail’s new Hartford Line that was launched in June.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A referendum regarding money put into the state’s special transportation fund will be on the ballot on Election Day in November. 

Connecticut Historical Society

Bicycles helped inspire modern cars, paved roads...even airplanes! But did you know they were also an inspiration for the women's movement?

This hour we take a look back in time at the origins of the bicycle, including innovation that happened right here in Connecticut. We find out the history of how this vehicle spurred social change and helped empower women to break through gender barriers a little more than a century ago.

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