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Damaged houses in Salinas, Puerto Rico.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

When Serafin Mendez heard that thousands of students from the University of Puerto Rico wouldn't be able to continue their education because of hurricane-related damage to the campus, he decided to do something.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Students from Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands will be able to pay in-state tuition rates to attend a state college.

WNPR/David DesRoches

The state's 12 community colleges could become consolidated into a single school by mid-2019. The 12 campuses would remain open, but would be renamed the Connecticut Community College.

Kuzma/iStock / Thinkstock

It's only a matter of time before Michael McCotter says he'll lose his job.

alkruse24 / Creative Commons

Sixteen years after the U.S. entered into war with Afghanistan -- a look at one woman's efforts to inform and inspire young Afghan girls.

This hour, Shabana Basij-Rasikh talks about her upbringing under the Taliban in Kabul and about her experience co-founding SOLA -- the School of Leadership, Afghanistan

mygueart/iStock / Thinkstock

The state's budget crisis is hitting Connecticut schools hard, and special education programs might also be feeling the pain, even though these services are protected by federal law.

John Phelan / Creative Commons

The Connecticut Supreme Court heard arguments on Thursday in a landmark school funding lawsuit. State officials are appealing a lower court decision, that ruled the state's funding system was unconstitutional.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

A little over a year ago, Superior Court Judge Thomas Moukawsher issued a sweeping decision in a landmark education lawsuit centered on the way Connecticut funds its public schools.

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

It's National Suicide Prevention Week -- a time to reflect on and raise awareness about an issue that touches thousands of Americans each year.

"Never forget" became a national rallying cry after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

Yet America's schools — where collective memory is shaped — are now full of students who never knew because they weren't alive then. Many teachers now struggle with whether and how to teach the attacks and their aftermath.

According to one survey, only about 20 states include anything in depth about the events of that fateful day in their high school social studies curriculum.

And when they are taught, critics say, it's often through a narrow lens.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Hartford schools are back in session -- though, this time, there’s a new superintendent in town.

Coming up, Dr. Leslie Torres-Rodriguez stops by our studios.

We talk about her vision for the district and answer your calls, tweets, and emails.

Do you have child in the Hartford Public School system? What questions do you have for its newest leader? 

Connecticut’s municipalities have blasted all sides in the ongoing state budget impasse. Town and city officials spoke out after Governor Dannel Malloy issued a report claiming that state aid to municipalities has grown more than 20 percent in the last five years. 

Frankie Graziano / WNPR

The Connecticut high school football season starts on September 8. Players like Bobby Melms began practicing earlier this month.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Classes started on Monday at UConn's new campus in downtown Hartford. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

School districts could see even more severe cuts than originally proposed in Governor Dannel Malloy's executive order, which has proposed to slash another $100 million from schools.

Lori Mack / WNPR

Educators, administrators, parents and students have called on Connecticut legislators to finalize a budget. They met to highlight their concerns after the education commissioner’s annual back-to-school meeting in Meriden Tuesday.

Frankie Graziano / WNPR

School budget issues may be particularly acute in 2017, but many athletic programs across Connecticut have dealt with flat funding for many years. And no district knows exactly how much money they will get from the state this year.

Photo Phiend / Creative Commons

Lawmakers in Hartford still have no state budget in place — and that’s creating widespread fiscal uncertainty for cities and towns across Connecticut.

This hour, we hear from municipal leaders about how they’re responding. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

If state lawmakers don't pass a budget, then Governor Dannel Malloy said he plans to cut overall state contributions to schools by 25 percent through executive order. But the cuts won’t be distributed equally.

At MIT, bright young engineers are still asked to tackle devilish math problems on their way to a degree.

But officials at Boston Public Schools (BPS) are hoping they can turn their attention to the world outside. Like the problem the district faces each morning: how to get thousands of students to school using more than 600 buses without burning through too much money or learning time.

SAT Scores Mixed For Connecticut Juniors

Aug 1, 2017
timlewisnm / Creative Commons

Connecticut officials praised the latest 11th grade SAT scores, saying that the state is further closing the achievement gap. But many students from the state's poorest performing districts remain far behind their high-achieving peers from other parts of the state.

Charter School Advocate Fires Back Against NAACP Report

Jul 31, 2017
ccarlstead / Creative Commons

The NAACP has published a paper that's heavily critical of charter schools. The civil rights group visited New Haven as part of a national listening tour, hearing from all sides of the charter school debate.

New Haven Police Department

A New Haven Rabbi has been charged with sexually assaulting a former high school student. The alleged abuse was said to have taken place from the early to mid-2000s.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Enid Rey is a nationally recognized figure for her work managing and promoting the school choice program for Hartford Public Schools. It’s a lottery-based system that, among other things, tries to pull in white and Asian students from the suburbs into Hartford. But earlier this month, Rey announced her resignation after about six years at the post.

David DesRoches/WNPR

On a muggy July afternoon, Sheena Harris is teaching about the creolization of African people during the years of slavery.

Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut

As Connecticut lawmakers decide where to cut state spending, advocates for early childhood education are concerned that the state could lose millions of dollars in long-term benefits if quality child-care remains on the chopping block.

Matthew / Creative Commons

A group of educators have proposed a plan to hire more teachers of color in Connecticut public schools.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

High school English class is usually a time to read books and write essays. If you draw pictures, you might get into trouble. But not in James Shivers’s English class at CREC Public Safety Academy in Enfield -- he actually asks his students to draw.

Jacqueline Rabe-Thomas/CT Mirror

A judge has temporarily halted the state’s plan to allow more minority students into Hartford-area magnet schools. The decision came after a three-day court hearing in the ongoing Sheff vs. O’Neill case.

Jacqueline Rabe-Thomas/CT Mirror

Martha Stone is a lawyer for the plaintiffs in the Sheff v. O'Neill case, which settled over 20 years ago. She said the state's current position threatens to harm Hartford students. 

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