WNPR

religion

Flickr Creative Commons, elbragon

In Petersberg KY, there's a Creation Museum where the exhibits at the museum teach that the Earth is 6,000 years old and was created in six 24-hour days. The founders say more than a million people have visited — 80 percent of which are from out of state. It's such a good economic development tool that the governor of Kentucky is supporting financial aid to a companion museum about Noah's Ark, with an ark built to biblical scale, to show people that the whole concept really could have worked. 

Flickr Creative Commons, NASA Goddard Photo and Video

Last night, I saw "Wicked" at the Bushnell and was reminded of all the little subversive political jabs in a musical that has otherwise succeeded in cornering the attention of 12 year old girls.

Gregthebusker, creative commons

Young people today have a lot of ways to define themselves – their clothes, their music, their Facebook profiles.  But what about religious and cultural identity?  These things are a bit trickier, especially for young secular Jews.  What does this identity mean today in a world where Israel is a place of pilgrimage, and the center of the thorniest political issues we face today?

Eternal Life

Jun 9, 2011
Flickr Creative Commons, cliff1066™

No religion that I can think of transformed its reputation as rapidly as the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.

Being Pagan

May 16, 2011
Flickr Creative Commons, epimetheus

In 1979, Margot Adler's book "Drawing Down the Moon" drew back the curtain on a highly developed and surprisingly well-populated world of of wiccans, covens, neopagans, goddess-worshipers, druids and even a group of people calling themselves "Radical faeries."

Being Pagan

May 16, 2011
Flickr Creative Commons, epimetheus

In 1979, Margot Adler's book "Drawing Down the Moon" drew back the curtain on a highly developed and surprisingly well-populated world of of wiccans, covens, neopagans, goddess-worshipers, druids and even a group of people calling themselves "Radical faeries."

Chion Wolf

Local Pakistanis are relieved to hear that Osama bin Laden has been killed by U.S. Special Forces.  Dr Saud Anwar, former President of the Pakistani American Association of Connecticut says it's "a high five moment" for  the United States and Pakistan. He spoke on WNPR's Where We Live.

Julie Dickerson

Recently a vandal broke into St. Paul and St. James Episcopal church in New Haven.  The ransacked the chapel, broken windows and tore a bible. 

So, how did the church community respond?  With a message of forgiveness through music.  Several days later the most valuable stolen items  were returned to the front step.  It’s just one of many examples of local artists promoting social justice, tolerance and change through their work. 

DMahendra, Creative Commons

Today, Long Island Congressman, Peter King, holds a hearing called "The Extent of Radicalization in the American Muslim Community and that Community's Response."

As chairman of the House Committee on Homeland Security, King says he wants to look into the threat of homegrown terrorism and its ties to Islam.

Jess Row, Author and Buddhist

Feb 12, 2011

Paper Trails is a new public-radio show about books, co-produced by WNPR and the New Haven Review. Paper Trails is not the usual feel-good suck-up to the author; on this show, co-hosts Mark Oppenheimer and Brian Francis Slattery give their honest opinions of the book . . . while the author listens in the studio. Then, in the second and third segments, the author gets to respond.

Flickr Creative Commons, Sir Mildred Pierce

As a former religion writer, I struggle with the whole idea of branding any particular religion as a "Cult."

New Haven Independent

Yann Beaullan’s mother is Jewish; his father is Cambodian. He grew up listening to Buddhist chants. On Sunday he was worshiping in Wooster Square—to the strains of alto saxes offering Coltranesque riffs on the Christian hymn “Praise God From Whom All Blessings Flow.”

Beaullan has joined what might be called a “happening” new phenomenon in the pews: a weekly jazz-style eucharist that is transforming St. James and St. Paul’s from one of the “frozen chosen” Episcopal churches in town to one of the coolest places to worship in New Haven.

Copyright 2014 Connecticut Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.wnpr.org.

Transcript

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Terrorist plots on U.S. soil, and terrorist acts around the world, are blamed on “radical” strains of Islam. But what are the causes of “radicalization,” and how can they be reversed? A conference this month in East Hartford brings together leading thinkers and writers – tackling the topics of violent extremism, the U.S. relationship with Pakistan and Pakistani Americans, and ways in which the Muslim community here is helping to weed out terrorism.

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