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Listen Tuesday at 1:00 pm 

Connecticut remains riveted by the unfolding saga of Jennifer Dulos, the wealthy, white New Canaan woman last seen almost four weeks ago. It's a tragic and familiar story. Yet, few cases receive the notoriety of this particular case. 

An NPR investigation has uncovered new evidence in a prominent unsolved murder case from the civil rights era, including the identity of an attacker who admitted his involvement but was never charged.

The murder of Boston minister James Reeb in 1965 drew national attention at the time and spurred passage of the Voting Rights Act, which outlawed the Jim Crow voting practices that had disenfranchised millions of black Americans.

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What efforts are underway -- both locally and nationally -- to help improve individuals’ access to housing?

This hour, we listen back to a panel moderated by Lucy Nalpathanchil in Hartford recently for the Connecticut Coalition to End Homelessness. We hear from policy and advocacy experts.

Later, we also learn about a "Net Zero" affordable housing proposal in the town of Norfolk.

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The American criminal justice system has become less 'just' over recent decades and prosecutors bear much of the responsibility.

Marco Verch / Creative Commons

It's just Colin and your calls.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

The call that came during the wee hours of the morning of March 24 was from a man in Enfield. He said he wanted to burn the Muhammad Islamic Center of Greater Hartford, using the n-word and other slurs against the members of the mosque that serves African-American, refugee, and immigrant Muslims.

Betsy Kaplan

Women scientists and inventors have been making ground-breaking discoveries since Agnodike pretended to be a man in order to become the first female anatomist in ancient Greece. Yet, women's scientific contributions have historically been hidden in the footnotes of the work men claimed as their own. 

Taylin Santiago, a New London High School student who identifies as Afro-Latino, testified in front of the Education Committee during a public hearing about H.B. 7082.
Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Do you remember high school history? The subject has the reputation of being “boring”, thick with names and dates that can be a chore to remember. But this hour we ask: How do the history lessons we learn in school shape the way we see the world around us?

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

A new education bill seeks to add African-American studies to the social studies curriculum in Connecticut public schools. High school students testifying before the legislature this week said loud and clear that Black history is more than just Rosa Parks, slavery and civil rights.

Photo by Carol Rosegg

Whose responsibility is it to confront institutional racism in our country today?

Good Faith: Four Chats About Race and the New Haven Fire Department is playing at Yale Reparatory Theatre this month. It revisits New Haven after a group of firefighters sued the city. The reverse discrimination lawsuit, Ricci v. DeStefano, was decided by the U.S Supreme Court.

Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

Obituaries can capture the life and achievements of individuals, from local community members to the famous. This hour we talk with an editor behind the New York Times’ “Overlooked” obituary series, which highlights black men and women whose contributions were overlooked at the time of their deaths like actress Nina Mae McKinney and ragtime composer Scott Joplin.

It may be tough to believe it's been just a week and a half since a racist photograph in a decades-old medical school yearbook knocked Virginia's leadership into disarray.

Political enemies and allies alike are calling for Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, a Democrat, to step down after a racist photo from his 1984 medical school yearbook was uncovered. But Northam has shown no inclination to do so. Now the two Democratic officials in line behind him to assume the governorship are both embroiled in scandals of their own.

The controversies rocking Richmond are a reminder of the complicated racial history that underpins Virginia politics.

Giphy.com

It's not a stretch to say the best part of Sunday's Super Bowl LIII was SpongeBob's short, but sweet, appearance during the halftime show. Should it be a surprise that the game was boring, the halftime show was bland, and the ads were forgettable? The long shadow of Colin Kaepernick cast a cloud over this game and the NFL has yet to deal with the fallout.

Updated at 6:02 p.m. ET

Jussie Smollett, one of the stars of the TV show Empire, reportedly was brutally attacked early Tuesday in what Chicago police are investigating as a possible hate crime. The 36-year-old actor took himself to the hospital directly after what police called a "possible racially-charged assault and battery"; authorities say he is in good condition.

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What we each saw in the short video (since deleted) that went viral this weekend of a Covington Catholic High School student staring at a Native American protestor on the National Mall is open to interpretation. Photos and videos carry the authority of truth, yet the 'truth' reflected in a video can vary, depending on what's included, what's left out and how it's framed.

Bob Adelman / Free the Beaches: The Story of Ned Coll and the Battle for America’s Most Exclusive Shoreline

Each summer, Connecticut residents flock to the shoreline, raising umbrellas and spreading towels along the state's beaches. Yet, behind this sunny imagery hides a somber history -- a story of coastal ownership and exclusivity.

This hour, Free the Beaches author Andrew Kahrl joins us. We reflect on the impact of Connecticut’s private and restricted beaches and learn about a 20th-century crusade to unlock the state’s coast.

Glenna Gordon

The most common image of white supremacy, nationalism, and other far-right movements is of angry men. Often overlooked are the women.

On the surface, they may appear less menacing. But in many ways, they serve a more insidious role: lending their groups a more palatable, family-values cover under which to operate and spread messages of intolerance.

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

This month marks 10 years since Connecticut first granted marriage licenses to gay and lesbian couples. This hour we talk about the work that led up to a historic ruling from the state Supreme Court and we learn how LGBTQ rights have advanced in recent years. Were you one of the couples that finally got to tie the knot in 2008?

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In the 1996 landmark Sheff v. O’Neill case, the Connecticut Supreme Court found that minority students in Hartford's public schools “suffered daily” due to racial and economic segregation.

Now, 22 years later -- Connecticut’s magnet school solution to Sheff’s desegregation mandate has been held up as a model for integration around the country. Yet many minority students in Hartford still attend struggling and highly segregated schools.

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A board set up to combat racial profiling by police has released a follow-up to last year's report on traffic stops and racial profiling across the state. The follow-up focused on eight towns that had unusually high number of minority traffic stops in the initial report.

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Nike is catching a lot of press for selecting former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick as the face of a new "Just Do It" ad campaign. 

Portrait of Tim Parrish
Ryan Caron King / WNPR

From Charleston to Charlottesville, white supremacy still has roots in some communities. What draws some Americans to embrace extreme, hateful racist ideologies?

We talk with Tim Parrish, a Connecticut resident with firsthand perspective. Now a college professor, Tim joined an extremely violent and racist crowd as a high school student in Louisiana.

Amherst College announced it's changing the name of the Lord Jeffrey Inn, a landmark hotel on campus.

Matthew Straubmuller / Creative Commons

 

Many of us hoped the white nationalist movement that instigated last year's "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, would suffer a fatal blow. The majority of Americans condemned both the blatant bigotry displayed by the protesters and the president's failure to single out the nationalists as the perpetrators of the "hatred, bigotry and violence." He instead, said he saw that violence "on many sides."

That's not what happened.

Vanessa de la Torre / WNPR

Students from Parkland, Florida travelled to Newtown Connecticut—the site of the Sandy Hook massacre—to rally against gun violence this weekend.  But the problem of gun violence is not just confined to mass shootings.

One year ago, a car rammed into counterprotesters during a violent white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va. Dozens of people were injured and paralegal and activist Heather Heyer was killed. Now, her mother is trying to fulfill a promise made at her funeral.

"They tried to kill my child to shut her up," Susan Bro told mourners last August. "Well, guess what? You just magnified her!"

Bob Adelman / Free the Beaches: The Story of Ned Coll and the Battle for America’s Most Exclusive Shoreline

This Independence Day, Connecticut residents will flock to the shoreline, raising umbrellas and spreading towels along the state's beaches.

Yet, behind this sunny imagery hides a somber history -- a story of coastal ownership and exclusivity.

This hour, University of Virginia professor and Free the Beaches author Andrew Kahrl joins us. We reflect on the impact of Connecticut’s private and restricted beaches and learn about a 20th-century crusade to unlock the state’s coast. 

Mark Fischer / Creative Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court decision to uphold President Trump's travel ban on five Muslim-majority countries as well as Venezuela and North Korea, is drawing criticism from Democratic lawmakers, the American Civil Liberties Union, and many Muslim groups.

Max Pixel / Creative Commons

Listen on Tuesday at 9:00 am.

Black children are three times more likely to drown in the United States than white children. This hour, we learn the history behind this deadly disparity.

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