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Connecticut Settles School Desegregation Case

Jan 10, 2020
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

State officials agreed Friday to enroll more than 1,000 new students in magnet schools as part of a milestone agreement in the decades-long Sheff vs. O’Neill school desegregation case. The agreement dedicates 600 of those seats to the more than 12,000 children who attend struggling, segregated schools in Hartford.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A recent stabbing at a Hanukkah gathering in New York has local leaders in the Jewish community worrying about acts of anti-Semitism taking place in Connecticut.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

An effort by Republican board of education members in Killingly, Connecticut to reinstate a high school mascot offensive to Native Americans has stalled.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr Creative Commons

Today we speak with actor and human-rights activist George Takei, not about his role as Lieutenant Sulu on the original Star Trek, but about a far more troubling chapter in his life. In his new graphic memoir They Called Us Enemy, George writes in detail about his childhood spent in an internment camp for Japanese-American citizens.

Sean Flynn / UConn Photo

The University of Connecticut has its first Rhodes scholar.

Wanjiku Gatheru, an environmental studies major from Pomfret, is one of 32 people who will study free of charge at England’s Oxford University for at least two years.

Crandall “CJ” Yopp

Dr. Khalilah Brown-Dean is a Quinnipiac University professor and author of Identity Politics in the United States. 

Earlier this month, she sat down with us in front of a live audience to talk about the book, which paints identity politics -- a term often associated with modern-day elections -- in a new, historical light.

This hour, we listen back to our conversation, and we also hear from you. 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public

William Outlaw is a natural leader. He's been a key figure in helping to lower New Haven's homicide rate over the last decade. He's a strategist and an organizer who can size up a situation quickly. He can defuse a threatening situation with his charisma and charm. He can run a business. 

As a street outreach worker in New Haven, he uses all the same skills today that he used when he co-ran New Haven's largest cocaine gang in the 1980's. 

Travis Wise / Creative Commons

President Trump changed his primary address from New York to Florida.  He says he'd been treated badly by political leaders.

He was also booed twice last week, first at Game Five of the World Series between the Washington Nationals and the Houston Astros, this past Saturday at UFC 244 at Madison Square Garden. It does hightlight how infrequently the president ventures beyond the safety of the controlled settings of his rallies. 

Brad K. / Creative Commons

Connecticut's "Second Chance Society" has reduced the number of people going into prison and better prepared offenders for a meaningful life when they get out. 

Abdul-Razak Zachariah and his younger sister.
Courtesy of Abdul-Razak Zachariah

The new children’s book The Night Is Yours by Abdul-Razak Zachariah captures a snapshot of life growing up in an apartment complex. This is Zachariah’s first book, and it’s based loosely on his childhood -- with his sister as inspiration for the main character. He and his family lived in Terrace Heights, an apartment complex in West Haven, Connecticut.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The University of Connecticut is moving forward with a series of initiatives to help the Storrs campus heal after a racist incident that drew outrage from many students.

Earlier this week, two white UConn students were arrested after they were identified on a viral video shouting racial slurs as they walked through the parking lot of Charter Oak apartments, an on-campus residence hall.

During a meeting of the UConn Board of Trustees Wednesday, University President Thomas Katsouleas said the incident has affected the student body.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Police arrested two University of Connecticut students Monday after a video posted to social media showed students shouting racial slurs outside of a campus residence hall.

Milestone C Stem / YouTube

The superintendent of schools in Shelton is speaking out days after a white student in the district spit on a black patron at a Washington, D.C. museum.

A majority of parents rarely, if ever, discuss race/ethnicity, gender, class or other categories of social identity with their kids, according to a new, nationally representative survey of more than 6,000 parents conducted by Sesame Workshop and NORC at the University of Chicago.

Courtesy: Seaview Productions

When it ran off-Broadway, the show Slave Play left audiences stunned. The provocative new script centers on three interracial couples – diving deeply into issues of racism, sexuality and love. Slave Play is now in previews and opening on Broadway in October.

Philippe Put / CreativeCommons.org

Women in America die more frequently from complications of childbirth than in any other industrialized nation in the world. In addition, women of color are three to four times more likely to die than white women. And over the last 25 years that the maternal mortality was rising in America, other countries were decreasing their rate. 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

U.S. Representative Jahanna Hayes (D-5th District) issued a press release Sunday accusing the news media of “clickbait journalism” in response to two recent stories she claims made “reckless assumptions” about her comments.

Province of British Columbia Follow / FLICKR

George Takei has lived long and prospered as an American actor, activist, and author. Although he’s best known for playing Lieutenant Hikaru Sulu on the original Star Trek television series, Takei has spent much of the last 20 years retelling his time spent living in U.S.-run internment camps during World War II.

TOM HINES

Ocean Vuong grew up in a Hartford that many of us don’t pay attention to. His family emigrated from Vietnam when he was two years old, and he came to know the area through the nail salons and tobacco fields where he and his mother worked. All the while, they struggled to create joy for themselves in the context of xenophobia, racism, and trauma from an American-led war that still weaves itself into our ways of knowing and living. 

His first novel, On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous, documents an American story that’s often erased — that of immigrant, war-torn, non-white, working-class life. 

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Today we speak with actor and human-rights activist George Takei, not about his role as Lieutenant Sulu on the original Star Trek, but about a far more troubling chapter in his life. In his new graphic memoir They Called Us Enemy, George writes in detail about his childhood spent in an internment camp for Japanese-American citizens.

Philippe Put / Creative Commons

Women in America die more frequently from complications of childbirth than in any other industrialized nation in the world. In addition, women of color are three to four times more likely to die than white women. And over the last 25 years that the maternal mortality was rising in America, other countries were decreasing their rate. 

Study: Segregation Is Key Factor For Racial Disparity In Police Shootings

Jul 21, 2019
Pixabay.com

Nationwide, police shoot black people at a rate three times higher than white people. Between 2013 and 2018, 28% of police shooting victims were black, twice their proportion of the overall population, according to the Mapping Police Violence Project.

Meredith Longo / Playhouse on Park

The Scottsboro Boys were arrested as freight train hoboes in Alabama in 1931 and quickly convicted by an all-white jury of raping two white women. After several retrials and appeals, the case led to two landmark Supreme Court rulings on the right to adequate counsel and prohibiting the exclusion of black people from juries.

The goal of the National African American Gun Association is to introduce black Americans to guns and also instruct them on how to use them.

Some see the group as an alternative to the National Rifle Association for black gun owners, but it has some notable differences. Organizers say it is a civil rights organization that aims to build community and promote self-protection.

Since its creation in 2015, the group has seen rapid growth with roughly 30,000 members and 75 chapters nationwide. Leaders expect another 25 chapters by next year.

The Wheelhouse: Lamont Announces Endorsement As Biden's Lead Shrinks

Jul 3, 2019
Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont announced Tuesday his support for Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden.

The news arrived amid reports that the former vice president’s polling lead is shrinking, as California U.S. Senator Kamala Harris' numbers rise. 

Marc Nozell / Creative Commons

Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang wants to give everyone a Universal Basic Income to offset the effects of automation. The plan resonates across a broad spectrum of voters from his "Yang Gang" to the alt-right and it has catapulted him to a spot in this week's Democratic primary debate alongside frontrunners Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders, and Kamala Harris. Who is this guy

Pexels

Connecticut remains riveted by the unfolding saga of Jennifer Dulos, the wealthy, white New Canaan woman last seen almost four weeks ago. It's a tragic and familiar story. Yet, few cases receive the notoriety of this particular case. 

Challenges threatening the upcoming 2020 census could put more than 4 million people at risk of being undercounted in next year's national head count, according to new projections by the Urban Institute.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The state’s attorney investigating the fatal Wethersfield, Conn. police shooting said she wants to go back to the beginning of the traffic stop and understand why police pulled over 18-year-old Anthony Jose “Chulo” Vega Cruz.

Russ / Creative Commons

A Trinity College professor who made controversial comments on social media related to racism two years ago has sparked another conversation, this time accusing the Obamas of perpetuating systemic white racism.

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