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A couple of Connecticut political scientists are not surprised by speculation in Washington that former U.S. Senator Joe Lieberman of Connecticut is on the White House short list to replace U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley.

Lamont's Contributions To His Own Campaign: $12.1 Million

Oct 10, 2018
Democratic candidate Ned Lamont talks to voters outside of Electric Boat in Groton, Conn.
Amar Batra / Connecticut Public Radio

Democrat Ned Lamont contributed $8.2 million to his gubernatorial campaign last month, bringing his total investment to $12.1 million since launching his candidacy in January, according to a campaign finance report filed Wednesday night.

Two issues continue to dominate this year's race for governor: taxes and the economy.

That notion has been reinforced by the latest Quinnipiac University poll. Of the likely voters surveyed, 31% said the economy was their chief concern, while 26% said it was taxes.

Climate change wasn't even an issue listed in the poll question. It's also been left largely unaddressed by those running for governor this year.

From left, Oz Griebel, Bob Stefanowski, and Ned Lamont at a recent debate at UConn.
CTMirror.org

With 27 days until Election Day, a new Quinnipiac University Poll has Democrat Ned Lamont leading Republican Bob Stefanowski among likely voters, 47 percent to 39. Third-party candidate Oz Griebel is at 11 percent.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

With less than a month before the 2018 midterm elections, efforts to register people to vote are in full swing, with everyone from Connecticut Secretary of the State Denise Merrill to Taylor Swift making a push.

But an image circulating around social media says the deadline in Connecticut is October 30, which is only partially true.

Ralph Alswang / Center for American Progress Action Fund

Former Secretary of State John Kerry said what he calls “tribalism” in government is threatening our democracy. He told an audience at Yale University Monday that he believes the destruction of the traditions of the Senate has put compromise out of reach in current politics. 

Updated 4:55 p.m. ET

Nikki Haley is resigning as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and will leave the Trump administration at the end of the year, she said Tuesday.

It is not immediately clear what prompted the move. She informed her staff Tuesday, NPR's Michele Kelemen reports.

Haley appeared with President Trump on Tuesday morning at the Oval Office, where he called her a "fantastic person" and said Haley had told him six months ago that she might take time off at the end of the year.

Donkey Hotey / Creative Commons

  

Newt Gingrich and Bill Clinton were using strategies to deliberately divide America's political system decades before the pivotal 2000 presidential election between Al Gore and George W. Bush divided us into gangs of  'red' or 'blue.'

Pixabay / Creative Commons

Today, we've booked no guests. It's Colin and your calls. 

Saturday's confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court was the anticlimatic coda to a nomination that has both riveted and more deeply divided our country.

Depending on your view, the Kavanaugh confirmation either endangers the legitimacy of the court or is a welcome culmination to a decades-long effort to capture a solid conservative majority on the high court.

Griebel: Tapping Pension Funds Risky - Doing Nothing Is Worse

Oct 7, 2018
Oz Griebel
Chion Wolf / WNPR

Oz Griebel concedes that his proposal to defer state pension contributions is a gamble.

He just doesn’t believe that this approach poses any more risk than continuing along the problematic path of tax hikes and program cuts that have vexed state finances over the past decade.

Annette Elizabeth Allen / NPR

The Senate is taking a procedural vote on whether or not to move Judge Brett Kavanaugh's Supreme Court nomination forward. 

U.S. Senator Chris Murphy of Connecticut says Judge Brett Kavanaugh is the most dangerous nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court in his lifetime. He said this in a speech on the U.S. Senate floor Thursday afternoon.

Updated at 10:12 p.m. ET

Judge Brett Kavanaugh issued a mea culpa of sorts on the eve of a key Senate vote that could determine whether or not he reaches the Supreme Court, admitting in an op-ed that his testimony last week forcefully defending himself from sexual assault allegations "might have been too emotional at times."

Updated at 7:51 a.m. ET on Thursday

The FBI's highly anticipated supplemental background check on Brett Kavanaugh was sent to the White House and Capitol Hill overnight, with senators set to review the report on Thursday in the final chapter of what has become a deeply acrimonious confirmation battle.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., announced the planned arrival of the report on Wednesday night and said all senators would get a chance to review it ahead of the next procedural milestones in the chamber.

From left, Oz Griebel, Bob Stefanowski, and Ned Lamont at a recent debate at UConn.
CTMirror.org

With the nation transfixed on the revelations pouring out of Washington, D.C., how much remaining brain capacity do voters have for Connecticut's governor's race?

It's undoubtedly hard to compete for attention against news cycles dominated by edge-of-your-seat histrionics that could shape the direction of the U.S. Supreme Court for a generation. So this week we set out to bring state politics back into focus.

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