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When you head to New York, do you ever take a break from the city and get lost on a trail in Central Park? This hour, we take a look at the life of the man behind that beloved and iconic city park: Connecticut native Frederick Law Olmsted.

Dying For A Photo

Sep 12, 2019
Sam Hawley / CreativeCommons.org

A photo of people inching their way up a snaking line to the peak of Mount Everest last month has drawn attention to a number of problems, one of which was the jostling at the top of the mountain to take social media-ready selfies and photos.

Stairway on path in Walnut Hill Park in New Britain, Connecticut
John Phelan / Wikimedia Commons

When you head to New York, do you ever take a break from the city and get lost on a trail in Central Park? This hour, we take a look at the life of the man behind that beloved and iconic city park: Connecticut native Frederick Law Olmsted.

Dying For A Photo

Jun 26, 2019
Sam Hawley / Creative Commons

A photo of people inching their way up a snaking line to the peak of Mount Everest last month has drawn attention to a number of problems, one of which was the jostling at the top of the mountain to take social media-ready selfies and photos. 

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

Sleeping Giant State Park in Hamden is once again open to visitors following a series of storms last spring that saw tornadoes touching down just outside the park’s border.

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The Thames River Heritage Park Foundation has received a grant to help expand and enhance the services the park provides.

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

Cleanup continues more than two months after a tornado hit Sleeping Giant State Park in Hamden - one of several tornados that touched down in Connecticut during severe storms in May.

jjbers / Creative Commons

Connecticut drivers renewing their vehicle registrations will pay an additional $10 fee starting this week. The fee will support a fund called "Passport to Parks."

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Last year, the number of homicides in Hartford was lower than in 2015. But murders in Connecticut’s capital city were up from 2016, including a spike in one Hartford neighborhood.

Updated at 9:30 p.m. ET

On a visit to Utah on Monday, President Trump announced his proclamations dramatically shrinking the size of the state's two massive national monuments, Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante. Taken together, Trump's orders mark the largest reversal of national monument protections in U.S. history.

The change has already been challenged in court by conservation groups.

Jonathan McNicol / WNPR

Note: This episode contains strong language.

There are 203 ballparks currently being used by affiliated, professional baseball teams in the United States: 30 in the Major Leagues, 23 spring training facilities used by the big league clubs and their Rookie League affiliates, and 150 Minor League stadiums spread over six levels of baseball.

Eli Christman / Creative Commons

The violence in Charlottesville last month over whether or not to remove a statue of Confederate soldier Robert E. Lee rekindled a heated debate that's more about national identity and race than about statues. But, it's easier to fight about statues than begin a long-overdue national discussion over how we remember our collective and complex national past - especially in the context of slavery.

Supporters of the Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument are going to have to wait to find out what’s in store for the project that encompasses nearly 88,000 acres.

Photo Courtesy Martin Podskoch / Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

In the midst of the Great Depression more than 80 years ago, President Franklin D. Roosevelt created the Civilian Conservation Corps — giving jobs to young men to support their families, while conserving the country’s wild lands and upgrading our state parks.

This hour, we revisit our show on the CCC’s impact in Connecticut and we hear from one “CCC boy” who is now 102 years old.

Dana Moos / Creative Commons

America’s national parks are experiencing record crowds — and some nature enthusiasts worry about what that means for the protected land. Is the sheer amount of people taking away the rustic experience these parks offer? 

Connecticut House Democrats

The U.S. Department of Interior and the National Park Service have selected Hartford as the beneficiary of a $750,000 grant

Photo Courtesy Martin Podskoch / Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

In the midst of the Great Depression more than 80 years ago, President Franklin D. Roosevelt created the Civilian Conservation Corps — giving jobs to young men to support their families, while conserving the country’s wild lands and upgrading our state parks.

This hour, we learn about the CCC’s impact in Connecticut and we hear from one “CCC boy” who is now 102 years old.

Norman B. Leventhal Map Center / Creative Commons

Long before our modern highways, there was an extensive network of Native American trails up and down the East Coast.

This hour, we hear about efforts to map these old trails and find out how they’re helping archaeologists and others learn about the past. 

ChrisHConnelly / Creative Commons

A resolution to change the state constitution has stalled in the legislature. It would modify how the state transfers public lands, but needs to jump through some legislative hoops before appearing as a ballot question for voters. 

Friends of Hammonasset / Creative Commons

With the unofficial start to summer on Memorial Day weekend, Connecticut legislators are looking at a creative way to save state parks from budget cuts, closures, and restricted services.

She was the alpha female of a wolf pack in Yellowstone National Park, sought after for photographs because of her unusual white coat.

Hikers found her suffering from severe wounds last month. The animal was euthanized by park staff shortly after.

The park now says the recognizable wolf suffered a gunshot wound, based on preliminary results of a necropsy by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The animal likely was shot sometime between April 10 at 1 a.m. and April 11 at 2 p.m. on the north side of the park, near Gardiner, Mont.

The Connecticut legislature is considering a bill that would ban the use of recycled tires in playgrounds.  

Friends of Hammonasset

UPDATE: Dennis Schain, spokesman for the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, stated: "It is likely that we will reduce the times the center is open in the upcoming offseason.  It is much less likely that we would actually close the nature center  for the winter months."

ORIGINAL POST:

A nature center on Long Island Sound could be closing just a few months after opening a brand new building. 

CJ Oliver / Creative Commons

The Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection announced they are shortening hours at state parks and campgrounds.

bbcamericangirl / Creative Commons

My mom loves roses, so I recently took her to Elizabeth Park in West Hartford. This is one of the first municipal rose gardens in the country.

A public meeting was held last night in New York City on whether to make the Stonewall Inn a national monument.

U.S. Congressman Jerry Nadler (D-10) told Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell and National Parks Service Director Jonathan Jarvis that it’s important to recognize that the gay rights movement began at the Stonewall Inn in 1969.

Paul Van Der Woof / Flickr Creative Commons

The Tragedy of the Commons follows the theory that people can't be trusted to take care of common property without degrading it or taking more than their fair share of resources. This idea was popularized by William Forster Lloyd, who published a pamphlet in 1833 using cow herders to prove that people couldn't be trusted to share our common resources wisely. He believed property should be owned privately.

David Brooks / Creative Commons

A bipartisan group of legislators is voicing support for a proposed state constitutional amendment that would make it more difficult to sell off Connecticut's forests and parks.

DFSB DE / Creative Commons

The Connecticut Audubon Society announced it's banning the use of aerial unmanned "drones" at all of its 19 privately-owned wildlife sanctuaries, but the measure is highlighting questions about just how far the organization can go.

Morrow Long / Creative Commons

One person has died and three others were injured when their car fell through the ice on a pond at a Connecticut state park.

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