New Haven Region | Connecticut Public Radio
WNPR

New Haven Region

Courtesy Long Wharf Theatre

New Haven's Long Wharf Theatre has announced its new Artistic Director. Jacob Padron, 38, has a lengthy resume as a director and producer at some of the most prestigious theater companies in the country, including Chicago's Steppenwolf Theater and Washington D.C.'s Arena Stage.

Armando Herreria

In theory, anyone who’s eligible but not registered in the state of Connecticut can register to vote the day of an election and cast a provisional ballot. But it’s a three-step process which takes some time, and that was the stumbling block for New Haven during Tuesday's election.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A seat on the 4:32 p.m. train out of Hartford’s union station is emerging as the most coveted seat on the CTrail’s new Hartford Line that was launched in June.

The U.S.-Mexico border fence near El Paso, Texas.
Office of Representative Phil Gingrey / Wikimedia

Thousands of migrants from Central America are making their way to the U.S. border. The publicity over the caravan has prompted President Donald Trump to stir up fears over immigration. But one refugee resettlement organization is encouraging people to look beyond the headlines. 

Jonathan McNicol / Connecticut Public Radio

Louis C.K.'s surprise return to a comedy club stage in late August was widely covered and discussed. His subsequent performances have maybe sparked less internet conversation, but they're just as confounding. This week, the owner of one club where C.K. has been performing has made a couple media appearances to explain his thinking about the whole thing.

And: Damian Chazelle is the director behind the three-time Academy Award-winner Whiplash and the six-time Academy Award-winner La La Land. His new movie, First Man, stars Ryan Gosling as Neil Armstrong.

Daderot / Creative Commons

An elite Connecticut boarding school has acknowledged more instances of faculty sexual misconduct. 

Serial Productions / This American Life / WBEZ Chicago

So we did a Nose last week. It was good. It was about the second season of Slow Burn and the third season of Serial, and it was kind of also about how both of those shows tie into our present moment in interesting ways and that that's kind of interesting and suchlike.

We thought it went well.

You probably would've thought so too.

Except you didn't hear it, so how would you know? That present moment that I was just talking about got in the way: We were preempted by some Senate Judiciary Committee vote or something.

So we brought the show back for this week. We hope you'll like it now too.

Daniel Hartwig / Flickr

The postseason proper is upon us!

Baseball has already played four winner-take-all games in three days. The Dodgers and the Brewers won their divisions in a pair of extra, tie-breaking game number 163s. And then the Cubs and the A's saw their seasons end in the two Wild Card Games.

And now we're onto a round of real, full-length, five-game series. The two National League Division Series start today, and the American League's DSes start tomorrow.

The New Haven Police Department says more than 60 media outlets across the country have asked to see an assault report that names Supreme Court Nominee Brett Kavanaugh. It details a bar fight that resulted in one arrest and a victim sent to the hospital.

Slate

It's been... quite a week. It kinda seems like nothing happened in pop culture at all this week, doesn't it? Regardless, The Nose has a mandate to satisfy.

Slow Burn is Slate's scripted, narrative impeachment podcast. The first season covered Watergate and President Nixon. The second (and current) season is covering Monica Lewinsky and President Clinton. It has a strong, willful woman at its center. It has some sexual malfeasance. It has some questionable testimony.

Serial is This American Life's scripted, narrative true crime podcast. The first and second seasons covered Adnan Syed and Bowe Bergdahl. The third (and current) season covers the court system in Cleveland. It has some justice and plenty of injustice. It has some lawyerly delays and obfuscation. It has at least one questionable judge.

Lori Mack / CT Public Radio

A coalition of New Haven high school and college students staged a walkout Thursday in support of Nelson Pinos. He’s the Ecuadorian husband and father of three who took sanctuary in a city church nearly a year ago to avoid deportation.

Graduate Max Johnson, New Haven Mayor Toni Harp, Governor Dannel Malloy.
Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

A San Francisco-based software engineering school is opening a new location in Connecticut. 

Portrait of Tim Parrish
Ryan Caron King / WNPR

From Charleston to Charlottesville, white supremacy still has roots in some communities. What draws some Americans to embrace extreme, hateful racist ideologies?

We talk with Tim Parrish, a Connecticut resident with firsthand perspective. Now a college professor, Tim joined an extremely violent and racist crowd as a high school student in Louisiana.

A 2-year-old girl living in a rental home in New Haven, Connecticut, tested positive for lead in her blood. The levels were nine times what the federal government says will cause irreversible development problems.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

One of the things you will learn this hour is how close New Haven came to being a possession of Spain. Even if you think you know the story of the New Haven Regicides, the men who fled to the New World rather than face punishment, by which I mean death, for their complicity in the execution of Charles I, we probably have some surprises for you.  

By we, I mean Lord Charles Spencer, who joins me in studio to talk about his book, Killers of the King. Spencer writes a very brisk and compelling style of history. To put it another way, if you like Game of Thrones, it's a pretty easy leap from there to this story. 

Paul Bass, New Haven Independent

Firefighters, police, and medics were among an army of first responders on the New Haven Green last week after reports of people losing consciousness, vomiting, and falling to the ground started streaming in. Crews transported victims to the hospital over 100 times as state and local officials scrambled to figure out what was going on.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A New Haven woman is scheduled to be deported to her native Bangladesh this Thursday. On Tuesday, she made it to Hartford for her final check-in with immigration officials.

Diane Orson / Connecticut Public Radio

New Haven, Connecticut was the site of more than 100 overdoses last week -- drawing national attention to the city and to a synthetic drug known as K2.

But what exactly is this drug? And how did it wind up in the hands of so many here in Connecticut? This hour, an addiction psychiatrist from Silver Hill Hospital joins us to answer our questions.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

It didn’t take long for the gloves to come off in the race to be Connecticut’s next governor.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

If you live, work, or study anywhere near Yale's Old Campus, the sounds of the bells emanating from Harkness Tower are probably a routine part of your day.

Anthony Crider / Creative Commons

To mark the one-year anniversary of the Charlottesville, Virginia rally, the Anti-Defamation League is looking to spread awareness surrounding acts of hate, with a new tool they’re calling a H.E.A.T. (Hate, Extremism, Anti-Semitism, and Terrorism) map.

Tony Hisgett / flickr creative commons

Sand is the most abundant material on Earth. And, other than water and air, sand is the natural resource we consume more than any other -- more, even, than oil.

Cyclists on a street in Amsterdam
Atauri / Flickr

Should streets be designed for cars? Some urban planners think we should be making our streets less efficient for automobiles, not more. This hour, can reimagining our streets create better communities?

Jesus Garzon

The Connecticut State Bond Commission approved funding for several community health centers in the state last week, including money to expand opioid addiction treatment at one facility in New Haven. 

Republic Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc.

Ariana Grande already had a top 10 hit from her forthcoming album, Sweetener. As of this week, she's got songs at numbers six and eleven on the Billboard Hot 100 with the debut of her single "God Is a Woman." The song and its video have become somewhat controversial in certain corners of the internet.

And: Gillian Flynn's Gone Girl was a literary phenomenon in 2012. In its wake, film/television rights for her previous novels were snapped up. And now, six years later, HBO is airing an eight-episode (and only eight episodes, by the way) miniseries adapted in part by Flynn and starring Amy Adams.

CHION WOLF / CONNECTICUT PUBLIC RADIO

Layoff notices went out Wednesday to 37 New Haven school staff members in the face of a budget deficit.

Most of the pink slips went to guidance counselors. Also laid off were several classroom teachers, library media specialists, and physical education teachers.

New Haven Symphony Orchestra

After a nearly three-year search, the New Haven Symphony Orchestra has announced its next music director.

Max Pixel

A four-year old boy died Thursday in West Haven after being left in a hot car. The victim’s two year old brother who was also in the vehicle, was taken to hospital but survived. The vehicle was parked outside an apartment complex in town, but the exact circumstances of the death aren’t yet clear, and police say the incident is still being investigated.

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

Police departments across the country, including New Haven, report that they’re seeing a rise in internet-related crimes. One officer even took a literary approach to the problem.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The tango you see in glitzy television dance competitions is not what you'd see in Buenos Aires.

And that’s why Gem Duras put together The Connecticut Tango Festival -- to promote the sense of community one would feel doing the dance in Argentina.

Pages