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Ned Lamont

Analysts: Lamont, Lawmakers Face $4.3 Billion Gap In Next Two-Year State Budget

Nov 20, 2020
Gov. Ned Lamont (right) and Democratic legislative leaders announcing their budget deal in 2019, Lamont’s first year in office.
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

State officials are facing almost $4.3 billion in red ink in the next two-year budget, due largely to the coronavirus-induced recession, according to a new report Friday from nonpartisan analysts.

Those deficits, while daunting, are significantly less imposing than the massive shortfalls Connecticut faced after the last recession in 2011 — gaps that forced a record-setting tax hike of nearly $1.9 billion nine years ago.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The holiday season is coming up, but Coronavirus cases are on the rise. This hour, we check in with Governor Ned Lamont. Many of us want to see our families, but is that the best thing to do for our state and our health?

Many of Connecticut's surrounding states have been placed on Connecticut’s travel advisory list. And Connecticut's own positivity rate is rising.

Governor Takes A Bow For Students Logging On. Data Doesn’t Back It Up

Oct 8, 2020
Gov. Lamont during a visit to New Britain High School. Students listen to him both in-person (foreground) and online (on the screen overhead).
Jacqueline Rabe Thomas / CTMirror.org

One month into the school year, Gov. Ned Lamont says online education during the pandemic is a success, noting that students are showing up for their virtual classes.

Connecticut Offers Trump Thoughts, Prayers And Criticism

Oct 2, 2020
The masks stayed on Friday when Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin and Gov. Ned Lamont got to the microphone.
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

Gov. Ned Lamont reacted cautiously Friday from both a political and public health standpoint to President Donald J. Trump having COVID-19, news that brought uncertainty to the presidential campaign and spasms of sympathy, snark and schadenfreude.

Cloe Poisson / CT Mirror

Health experts around the world recognized early in the COVID-19 pandemic that older people were most at risk of becoming seriously ill and dying from the new coronavirus.

But despite those early findings, thousands of Connecticut residents in long-term care facilities have died. 

Lamont’s Plan To Close $2B Deficit Could Be To Tap CT’s $3B Rainy Day Fund

Oct 1, 2020
File photo of Gov. Ned Lamont and his budget adviser, Melissa McCaw. Both met with the Senate Republicans.
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

Gov. Ned Lamont owes legislators a plan Thursday to close a whopping $2 billion budget deficit.

DAVE WURTZEL / Connecticut Public

Friends and families of Connecticut’s nursing home residents are now allowed to make indoor, in-person visits under new guidelines from state officials. 

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

As the weather gets colder and more students go back to school, what do the next steps in reopening Connecticut look like? Will Connecticut need to even scale back reopening? This hour, Governor Lamont calls into the show to answer our questions and yours.  

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

The former commissioner of the state Department of Public Health is firing back over her May termination ahead of an impending report this month on Connecticut’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Two months after Gov. Ned Lamont announced her dismissal, Renée Coleman-Mitchell said in a written statement released late Monday night by the law office of Eric R. Brown that she was going to “set the record straight in my own words.” 

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Gov. Ned Lamont Thursday continued his tour of towns throughout the state recovering from Tropical Storm Isaias, as residents tried their best to make do without power.

Pixabay

May 20th marked the first phase of Re-open Connecticut. What conditions will need to be met before Phase 2 starts on June 20th? This hour, Governor Ned Lamont calls in to talk about what Phase 2 will look like. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Last month, the Connecticut Department of Labor received more than 300,000 unemployment claims. Last week, Governor Ned Lamont announced the formation of a multi-state council to get people back to work and restore the economy.

This hour, we’re speaking with Governor Lamont to understand just what this means. What will easing COVID-19 restrictions look like?

Later, we will hear from the Connecticut Department of Labor Deputy Commissioner Daryle Dudzinski on how those claims are being processed. 

We want to hear from you. What questions do you have for Governor Lamont, and Commissioner Daryle Dudzinski?

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

This hour, Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont is calling in to give us the latest on the state’s response to coronavirus

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public Radio

State officials in Hartford Friday said they want to expand coronavirus testing “dramatically” in the next couple days and weeks.  

Gov. Ned Lamont said this will cover more people who need to be tested or treated quickly. 

Mounds Succeeds Drajewicz As Lamont's Chief Of Staff

Feb 28, 2020
Ryan Drajewicz with Gov. Ned Lamont as they announce Drajewicz's exit as chief of staff.
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

One of Gov. Ned Lamont’s highest-profile recruits from the private sector, Ryan Drajewicz, is leaving the administration after 13 months as the governor’s chief of staff, a long-rumored departure resulting in a reshuffling of two other appointees, Paul Mounds and Josh Geballe.

veteran protests for environmental protection
Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

Holding colorful picket signs, wearing shirts reading “Frack No” and doing lots of chanting, protesters made their way from the headquarters of the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection in Hartford to the steps of the state Capitol Wednesday afternoon.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

It now appears there will be no special session on truck tolls ahead of the regular General Assembly session that starts Wednesday.  

Democrats had been planning for a truck tolls vote Monday or Tuesday.

MATT DWYER / CONNECTICUT PUBLIC RADIO

Gov. Ned Lamont on Thursday announced the first CEO of the Paid Family and Medical Leave Insurance Authority, a quasi-public agency that will run a new state system of paid family medical leave.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

The Wheelhouse roars back to life to confront tolls, the ways and means of Ned Lamont, and the latest Sheff V. O’Neill school desegregation settlement! 

Plus, the long-awaited reveal of the new Wheelhouse host, Lucy Nalpathanchil!

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

 

Gov. Ned Lamont held a private meeting at his residence in Hartford Wednesday with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to discuss policy and plans around transportation, cybersecurity, economic ventures, marijuana regulation and more.

High up on the list of concerns shared by the two governors is the nationwide outbreak of serious lung illnesses that may be related to vaping.

Lamont Offers Middle Ground On Restaurant Wage Fight

Sep 24, 2019
Chion Wolf / WNPR

Gov. Ned Lamont has asked legislative leaders to return in special session to vote on a revised version of a restaurant tip-credit bill he vetoed in July, suggesting that talks with unions, business owners and other stakeholders have produced the framework of a consensus.

Lamont, who vetoed a bill that would have stripped restaurant workers of the right to pursue claims of unpaid wages in certain circumstances, is proposing instead to limit damages they could collect from restaurants that relied on inaccurate advice from the Department of Labor in calculating tip-credit wages.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Gov. Ned Lamont and other state leaders promised Monday they would back efforts to eliminate the state’s religious exemption for mandatory childhood vaccinations in order to preserve immunization levels and prevent disease outbreaks.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Sticks & Stones is Dave Chappelle's fifth standup comedy special for Netflix in three years. All four previous specials won the Grammy for Best Comedy Album, and one of them won the Emmy for Outstanding Variety Special. The critical response to this latest special, though, has been a bit more muted.

Government of Prince Edward Island / Creative Commons

Fewer Connecticut kindergarteners are getting vaccinated for measles, mumps and rubella, and more students are getting religious exemptions for mandatory vaccines, new data shows.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Executives and labor leaders at a group of skilled nursing homes in Connecticut that are set to lose Medicaid funding plan to challenge the state’s decision — they said otherwise, their nursing homes face severe financial cuts. 

Gov. Ned Lamont delivered his first budget address to the legislature on February 20, 2019.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Gov. Ned Lamont is out of the office.

“He’s been gone since Friday,” Max Reiss, his spokesman, said on Sunday. “His family takes a summer trip to Maine. Some years it’s been as long as a month that they go up there. This year he’s taking two weeks.”

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

The United States Court House building in Hartford is home to an office of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement or ICE, which has recently been directed by President Donald Trump and his administration to carry out mass raids and deportations in major cities of undocumented immigrants.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Democratic legislators and government officials stood with a small crowd of supporters at the Legislative Office Building in March to announce that it was time that Connecticut created a public option health insurance program. 

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

A strike threat by thousands of nursing home workers across Connecticut has been withdrawn after a large group of the nursing home facilities reached a new contract deal Friday.

Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

This hour, we look at how successful Governor Ned Lamont's first hundred days were, and what his plans are to create a "cost-efficient, user friendly" government. Meanwhile, he's at odds with fellow Democrats over a proposed controversal tax increase on the state's wealthy residents.

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