natural disaster | Connecticut Public Radio
WNPR

natural disaster

Updated at 5 a.m. ET on Tuesday

Hurricane Florence is growing in size and strength as it barrels toward the Southeastern U.S. for an expected landfall in the Carolinas later this week as an "extremely dangerous hurricane," according to the National Hurricane Center.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The Puerto Rican government has acknowledged that nearly 3,000 people died after Hurricane Maria hit the island last year. At first, it said that only 64 people perished as a result of the storm.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Last fall, 2,281 new students poured into Connecticut from Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands in the wake of Hurricane Maria. Sixty-five percent of them went to five of the state's largest cities -- the ones that were already dealing with fiscal crises.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Update: The Puerto Rican government acknowledged in a preliminary draft recovery plan submitted to Congress that it is likely more than 1,400 people died in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria.

Another study is out that places the death toll related to Hurricane Maria much higher than the estimate originally put out by the Puerto Rican government.

The spread of a deadly wildfire that has swept through Northern California in recent days, killing at least six people, showed some signs of slowing down on Sunday.

Updated at 11:55 a.m. ET

At least two people have died as a fast-moving fire in Northern California jumped the Sacramento River and charged into the city of Redding, sending residents fleeing ahead of the flames late Thursday. The Carr Fire has burned more than 44,000 acres and was only 3 percent contained as of Friday morning.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

This hour, we learn about a new online series about "extreme inequality" in Connecticut.

We also look at trends in white shark activity off the coast of Cape Cod.

But first, an update on hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico. How well-equipped are the island and its residents to face a possible next storm?

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Advocates for families relocated from Puerto Rico want the Federal Emergency Management Agency to come up with a longer-term solution for Transitional Shelter Assistance for Hurricane Maria evacuees.

Lori Mack / CT Public Radio

Officials from the Federal Emergency Management Agency are assessing the damage caused by multiple tornadoes and storms that hit Connecticut last month. Two people died and more than 120,000 homes and businesses lost power.

There's more rain falling on some parts of the U.S. than there used to be, and many towns just aren't ready for the flooding that follows.

Ellicott City, Md., is one such community. Nestled in a valley west of Baltimore, the town was founded in 1772, and some Revolutionary War-era buildings still house businesses along the narrow main street in historic downtown. It also sits at the confluence of three streams.

Centers for Disease Control And Prevention (CDC)

Amid the high-profile deaths of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain came news of a new CDC report outlining a rise in U.S. suicide rates. This hour, we take an in-depth look at the numbers with Dr. Jill Harkavy-Friedman of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.

Plus: On the heels of last month’s violent storms, we hear about efforts underway to restore one of the state’s most damaged -- and beloved -- outdoor areas: Sleeping Giant State Park.

And finally: In search of a good ol' non-fiction murder mystery? Or, better yet, one with a Connecticut twist? Look no further than New London’s The Day. A little later, reporter Karen Florin and digital news director Carlos Virgen take us behind the scenes of the newspaper's new crime podcast, Case Unsolved. Have you been listening?

Tom Tyler, director of Connecticut State Parks, inside Sleeping Giant's picnic area. This and other parts of the park were destroyed following severe storms. Tyler said he's "optimistic" parts will re-open before the fall.
Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

In May, several tornadoes touched down in Connecticut -- destroying homes, uprooting trees and knocking out power to thousands of customers. The weather also devastated several state parks, including the iconic Sleeping Giant State Park in Hamden.

Hurricanes are moving more slowly over both land and water, and that's bad news for communities in their path.

In the past 70 years, tropical cyclones around the world have slowed down 10 percent, and in some regions of the world, the change has been even more significant, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

That means storms are spending more time hanging out, battering buildings with wind and dropping more rain.

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

The death toll from Guatemala's Fuego volcano rose to at least 99 on Wednesday, with many people still missing, after two strong explosions that scattered ash over a wide area and displaced thousands of residents from their homes.

The scenes of devastation were accompanied by heartbreaking stories of entire families devastated by the disaster — the biggest eruption from the mountain in four decades.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

State officials are appealing to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA, for help recovering from a May 15 storm, which caused widespread damage in Fairfield, Litchfield, and New Haven counties.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Sen. Richard Blumenthal wants the Trump administration to take responsibility for the death toll in Puerto Rico as a result of Hurricane Maria, which a new study has now pegged at almost 5,000.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The Federal Emergency Management Agency has issued a new deadline for hurricane evacuees from Puerto Rico to sign up for help--June 18.

Catherine Boyce

This hour, Save the Children U.S. President and CEO Carolyn Miles joins us. We talk about her decades-long career and learn about the unconventional journey that led her to the Fairfield-based NGO.

It’s the latest conversation in Connecticut Public Radio's “Making Her Story” series, featuring prominent women with ties to the state. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A House bill to provide state aid for evacuees from Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands is being held back by its sponsors. The move is being made because it likely wouldn’t have made it out of the appropriations committee.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The entire island of Puerto Rico lost power Wednesday morning-- its second major outage in a week.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Six months after Hurricane Maria, evacuees from Puerto Rico are still looking for affordable places to live. And they’re looking to the government for help, particularly through available public housing, but they’re not getting it.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A letter signed by Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin, Bridgeport Mayor Joe Ganim, New Haven Mayor Toni Harp, and six other mayors from Connecticut’s larger cities was sent to Governor Dannel Malloy Monday asking for assistance with evacuee families in three areas.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

A two-bedroom unit at Brick Hollow in Hartford comes with a refrigerator, a stove, and a washer and dryer.

Maribel Perez has five people that live with her and no money to stock her new apartment with basic furniture.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

This week will mark six months since Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico, devastating the island.

Since the storm, thousands of Puerto Ricans have moved to Connecticut to restart their lives. This hour, we hear some of their stories as we take stock of the continuing impact of the hurricane.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The Connecticut Puerto Rican Agenda held a “Rally And Lobby Day for Puerto Rican Families” Wednesday in Hartford. The event was put on at the Capitol to get support for a disaster relief bill proposed in the House of Representatives.

Connecticut Puerto Rican Agenda

A rally for Puerto Rican families will take place in Hartford on Wednesday. Organizers of the event hope it will lead to the passage of a bill in the Connecticut legislature that will set aside money for hurricane relief.

It's no secret that we've had a rough fall and winter with natural disasters. Even as we write this, fires burn in Southern California, adding to the previous wildfires in the northern part of the state that burned over 245,000 acres in October.

Hurricanes Irma and Harvey devastated communities across Florida and Texas, while touching communities in Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, the Carolinas and Louisiana.

Updated at 10:15 p.m. ET

A 70-year old woman found dead in her car Wednesday night along a fire evacuation route in Ventura County is the first human fatality caused by wildfires that have scorched Southern California this week.

The Ventura County medical examiner said Virginia Pesola of Santa Paula, Calif., died due to blunt force trauma with terminal smoke inhalation and thermal injuries.

Updated at 10 p.m. ET

Driven by fierce Santa Ana winds, four intense fires near Los Angeles grew to engulf more than 115,000 acres Thursday, and officials say residents should continue to expect dangerous fire conditions, as both strong winds and very dry conditions persist.

Pages