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marketing

Ray Hardman / WNPR

In a press conference at the legislative office building in Hartford on Monday, U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal called on energy drink companies to stop marketing their product to children through toys bearing the energy drink's logo.

Harriet Jones

Connecticut’s tourism districts are preparing to make their pitch to the legislature about why they should survive in these straitened economic times. WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports.

Can Small Be Revolutionary, Too?

Jun 27, 2012
Sarah Miner

 Tourism in Connecticut seems to revolve around a few big names. The Seaport, the Aquarium, and the casinos. These are prominently featured in the state’s new marketing campaign. But the industry is also sustained by hundreds of small businesses – inns, restaurants and small attractions. They’re wondering if they’ll get a fair shake in this new focus on state marketing. 

rich701, Flickr Creative Commons

Maybe what Connecticut needed, during and immediately after the American Revolution, was a huge marketing campaign like the one recently announced. As most of you know, the state has just jumped into a $27 million marketing push with the slogan "Still Revolutionary."

Chowder, Inc

If Connecticut’s new marketing campaign is any indication, we’re a state filled with “history.”

History is the main theme behind the 2-year, $27 million tourism project - which now has the tagline, “Connecticut: Still Revolutionary.”  It’s meant to capitalize not just on our role in the revolutionary war as well as the revolutionary thinkers, builders and tinkerers our state has been home to.  

The state has launched its new marketing campaign with the slogan – “Connecticut, Still Revolutionary.” The campaign is the result of a four-month project conducted by an outside consultancy.

The state will spend $27 million over two years marketing itself as a tourism destination – a far cry from the recent past, when Connecticut’s marketing budget was reduced to just one dollar. At a press conference to launch the new campaign, the state’s tourism director Randy Fiveash says surveys elsewhere in the country show that budget cut hurt Connecticut.

Josh Madison (Flickr Creative Commons)

Connecticut is working to get back on the tourism map...and the Eastern part of the state is a big part of that plan.

The region has some of the most evocative names... “Mystic Country” and “The Quiet Corner.” It has legendary seaports like New London and Stonington, and the many perfect little New England towns along the Connecticut River.

But how is the tourism industry holding up during the recession? And how will the state’s plan affect the many small businesses in the region.

Flickr Creative Commons, mccun934

It seems oddly fitting that today we're doing a show about performers and writers who, rather than seek the approval of publishers and entertainment companies, put everything together on their own. They produce. They publish. They market. They, if all goes well, collect.

Chion Wolf

2011 saw the city of Hartford embark on a grand new plan to market itself. We’ll get an update from Oz Griebel on how the effort to sell the capitol city is moving along.

Patrick Raycraft, The Hartford Courant

You're about to meet Poster Boy, an artist who defaces and rearranges advertising posters so that new messages appear. His work is up at Real Art Ways and we recorded this interview late last week.

Last year U.S. companies spent more than $26 billion advertising on the Internet. They’re on track to surpass that record number in 2011. In the latest in our occasional series, WNPR’s Harriet Jones looks at the small Connecticut companies who are benefiting from that trend.

Times might be hard in many industries right now, but at the offices of WebSolutions in Meriden, you’d never know it.

jglazer75, Wikipedia.

The recent MetroHartford Alliance roll-out of new logos and ad campaigns irritated a lot of people, including me, because the whole thing seemed so disconnected from the Hartford I know.

It was the work of a Canadian marketing company which seemed to know about as much about Hartford as I know about Toronto. They said they had talked to a lot of key stakeholders, but they didn't seem to have talked to anybody I think of when I think about the bees who make Hartford buzz.

Lomo-Cam, Flickr Creative Commons

Ah, the supermarket! The temple of abundance!
Listen to  Don Delillo's characters describe it in the novel "White Noise":

Courtesy Cundari Group

Today on the Nose, we talked about the controversial $200,000 marketing report released earlier this week.

Hedge Funds

Jun 8, 2011
AMagill, Creative Commons

Hedge Fund managers are America’s new economic elite...they weathered the storm of the financial collapse better than anyone, and have made the kind of money that’s hard to imagine.  In fact, author Sebastian Mallaby calls it “More Money Than God.” He’s studied the history of hedge funds for this bestselling book that’s - now out in paperback.  

He paints a picture of complicated men - who crave secrecy, exude eccentricity, and who have unlocked the mystery of how markets work, making billions in the process.

Delivering From The Farm To The Kitchen

Jun 3, 2011
Nancy Eve Cohen

There’s been a growing demand for local food. But getting the food from the farm to consumers can take a lot of time and effort. WNPR’s Nancy Cohen reports on one business that’s trying to fill that niche.

The restaurant at the Copper Beach Inn in Ivoryton has set a big goal for itself. 90% of the food it serves this summer will be local

“Potatoes, onions, salt, everything!”

Harriet Jones

Tourism is vital industry for Connecticut, generating some $14 billion in visitor spending each year. Small businesses are the mainstay of the sector. But as WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports, many are worried about the future.

Governor Dannel Malloy says he gets it on tourism.

“We’re going to rethink in its entirety our approach to tourism—we’re going to work where partnerships work and we’re not going to carry partnerships that don’t work.”

Last year President Obama challenged the nation’s businesses to double their exports within 5 years. Connecticut has been responding to that call, and as WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports, small business has been a key part of the effort.

Exporting—selling products overseas—is complex and often challenging. It may not seem to be a natural fit for a small business. Not so, says economist Peter Gioia of the Connecticut Business and Industry Association.

Flickr Creative Commons, phrenzee

Today we'll be analyzing the commercials from last night's Super Bowl. Why? Because, as one writer for Salon.com put it, "We all accept the Super Bowl as less of a game than a pop culture nexus point -- a place where the American self-image asserts itself with familiar rituals ... while cautiously acknowledging the present and looking to the future. The Super Bowl's expansive and awkward mix of performers, images, products and messages is a spectacle of its own."

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