law | Connecticut Public Radio
WNPR

law

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Proposals that would expand gaming in Connecticut are on their way to the floor of the state legislature.

Lawmakers passed several bills Tuesday, ranging from legislation that would skirt federal approval to authorize the building of a casino in East Windsor, to blueprints for how sports betting could be adopted in the state.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

In a public hearing for several gun bills that lasted for more than eight hours, the testimonies of concerned mothers, proud gun owners, weary police chiefs, and drained doctors were put forth for the Judiciary Committee's consideration. 

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

A new education bill seeks to add African-American studies to the social studies curriculum in Connecticut public schools. High school students testifying before the legislature this week said loud and clear that Black history is more than just Rosa Parks, slavery and civil rights.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

As the one-year anniversary of the Parkland school shooting approaches, lawmakers and gun safety advocates reintroduced the Keep Americans Safe Act. Originally introduced after the 2017 Las Vegas mass shooting, the federal bill focuses on banning and classifying magazines that can hold more than 10 rounds of ammunition.

Michelle Lee / Creative Commons

Senate Democrats rolled out a legislative agenda for what they’re calling “A Just Connecticut” in the 2019 legislative session. 

nathanmac87 / Flickr

Cities and towns have laws to keep people from engaging in behavior that may disturb others, like sleeping on park benches, drinking in public, or just plain “loitering”.

What does it mean when just hanging out in a public space puts you in violation of these laws?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The significance of being confirmed as Connecticut's first African-American state Supreme Court chief justice last May didn't fully sink in for Richard A. Robinson until a class of mostly minority students recently showed up to the Hartford court building for a tour.

Copyright Peter Kuper / Peter Kuper

Most of us know what Kafkaesque means even if we've never read a word Kafka wrote. 

For example, it's Kafkaesque when your smart home turns on you. It's not Kafkaesque when you wait in line for two hours at DMV and they close the line when you get to the front. (Well, it's a little Kafkaesque.)

Bob Adelman / Free the Beaches: The Story of Ned Coll and the Battle for America’s Most Exclusive Shoreline

Each summer, Connecticut residents flock to the shoreline, raising umbrellas and spreading towels along the state's beaches. Yet, behind this sunny imagery hides a somber history -- a story of coastal ownership and exclusivity.

This hour, Free the Beaches author Andrew Kahrl joins us. We reflect on the impact of Connecticut’s private and restricted beaches and learn about a 20th-century crusade to unlock the state’s coast.

Photo by Yutaka Tsutano, Courtesy of Flickr CC

School districts across the state have varying practices on when and whether school officials should seize and search a student's phone. Now, there's an effort underway to make a statewide policy.

Jiri Nedorost / Creative Commons

Whether for sport or sustenance; by rifle or crossbow, hunting has long been a part of the human experience.

This hour, we look back on our relationship with hunting and consider what it means to hunt today.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

A state attorney general is expected to be the “people’s lawyer.” William Tong said that when he assumes Connecticut’s attorney general post in January, he’ll look for a new way to advocate for his constituents.

Creative Commons

What did he know and when did he know it?

Prosecutors from Special Counsel Robert Mueller's team and the Southern District of New York on Friday afternoon came closer to answering these questions as they relate to President Trump and his campaign's interference in the 2016 election.

In a case that could shed light on the finances of the secretive Trump Organization, a federal judge has signed orders to issue 30 subpoenas on behalf of the attorneys general of Maryland and the District of Columbia in their lawsuit alleging that President Trump is profiting from foreign and state governments' spending at the Trump International Hotel in downtown Washington, D.C.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A Hartford woman is hoping for a last-minute stay of deportation before she’s ordered to leave her family behind for London in 10 days.

Kristin Song on the steps of First Congregational Church in Guilford.
Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

The parents of a Guilford teen who accidentally shot and killed himself at a friend’s house in January are pushing for a change to Connecticut’s gun laws. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The state of Connecticut is going after the pension of former Hartford Mayor Eddie A. Perez, who pleaded guilty last year to two corruption-related charges.

thetruthpreneur / Creative Commons

The National Council for Adoption has reported a decline in U.S. intercountry adoptions since the year 2004.

This hour, we discuss the factors driving this downward shift and consider how it compares to trends in the adoption of children born domestically.

We also hear from two Connecticut residents with unique adoption experiences -- one as an adoptive father, the other as an adopted son.

If you have an adoption story you want to share, we want to hear from you, too.

United Kingdom Government / Wikimedia Commons

This weekend was the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I. World leaders convened in Paris and listened to French president Emmanuel Macron warn against reviving the "old demons" of nationalism that led to our first world war. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

This month marks 10 years since Connecticut first granted marriage licenses to gay and lesbian couples. This hour we talk about the work that led up to a historic ruling from the state Supreme Court and we learn how LGBTQ rights have advanced in recent years. Were you one of the couples that finally got to tie the knot in 2008?

Jiri Nedorost / Creative Commons

Whether for sport or sustenance; by rifle or crossbow, hunting has long been a part of the human experience.

This hour, we look back on our relationship with hunting and consider what it means to hunt today.

Are you a hunter? We want to hear from you. 

Pixabay / Creative Commons

Today, we've booked no guests. It's Colin and your calls. 

Saturday's confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court was the anticlimatic coda to a nomination that has both riveted and more deeply divided our country.

Depending on your view, the Kavanaugh confirmation either endangers the legitimacy of the court or is a welcome culmination to a decades-long effort to capture a solid conservative majority on the high court.

Eric Draper / Wikimedia Commons

Like many Americans, our newsroom was glued to the eight or so hours of testimony by Dr. Christine Blasey-Ford and Judge Brett Kavanaugh during last week's Senate Judiciary Hearings, including the dramatic committee vote on Friday that led to a limited FBI investigation. 

Eric Draper / Wikimedia Commons

The nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to fill the seat of departing Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy had already widened the chasm between Democrats and Republicans before allegations of sexual assault against Kavanaugh blew it wide open. 

Angela N / Creative Commons

Today, we have no guests. We want to hear from you. We canceled our previously planned show so we could dedicate the entire hour to understanding how you are feeling about the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the  Supreme Court.

thetruthpreneur / Creative Commons

The National Council for Adoption has reported a decline in U.S. intercountry adoptions since the year 2004.

This hour, we discuss the factors driving this downward shift and consider how it compares to trends in the adoption of children born domestically.

We also hear from two Connecticut residents with unique adoption experiences -- one as an adoptive father, the other as an adopted son.

If you have an adoption story you want to share, we want to hear from you, too.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

An investigation has found that seven former faculty members at the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville sexually abused students over a 23-year period.

Updated at 7:34 p.m. ET

After an initial focus on Paul Manafort's lavish spending, including on luxury suits and home landscaping, the former Trump campaign chairman's trial has now moved squarely into the heart of his alleged financial crimes

On Day 4 of the federal trial Friday in Alexandria, Va., jurors heard from two of Manafort's former tax accountants, Cindy Laporta and Philip Ayliff. Their testimony directly addressed the bank and tax fraud charges the government has brought against Manafort.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A Syracuse University study revealed that the Hartford Immigration Court on average sets the highest bonds in the nation for undocumented immigrants facing deportation proceedings. At $15,000, it’s twice the national average.

Cody R. Wilson/"@radomysisky" on Twitter

Connecticut has announced it’s joining a group of states suing the federal government over a settlement reached in June with a Texas group that wants to distribute blueprints to create untraceable guns by 3D printing.

Pages