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Lonnie Tague / United States Department of Justice

The sudden resignation of New York’s attorney general could complicate lawsuits where Connecticut cooperates with the Empire State.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This week's Nose tackles Kanye's bromance with President Trump. And we've got an update on monkey selfies!

Plus: Courtney Balaker's Little Pink House, which opens today at Real Art Ways in Hartford, tells the story of Kelo v. City of New London. Catherine Keener plays Susette Kelo. There's an unnamed version of Governor John Rowland. Keith Kountz makes an appearance. The movie is kind of Erin Brockovich, but on the Connecticut Shoreline in the Late '90s/Early 2000s. The Nose has seen it.

frankieleon / Creative Commons

We didn't book any guests today. We decided to take your calls for the entire hour so you could share what's on your mind.

A lot happened this weekend in the news that you may want to talk about. But, instead of encouraging reactions to the latest news, many of you expressed interest on Colin's Facebook page in talking about something deeper. 

Drones: Law Enforcement’s Newest Recruits

Apr 16, 2018
MIKI Yoshihito / Creative Commons

Rapidly advancing technology is changing the way we do a lot of things... including policing.

This hour: police drones are coming to Hartford. Are they an invasion of privacy or a helpful tool for law enforcement? And how are lawmakers debating this new technology? What do you think about police using drones? Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.

Creative Commons

Does the investigation of Trump lawyer Michael Cohen signal the beginning of the end for the Trump presidency? 

Gary Lewis

The death of J. Edgar Hoover in 1972 marked a turning point within the F.B.I.: the opening of the bureau’s ranks to women.

Connecticut native Sheila Horan was among the first to sign on, kickstarting a 28-year career with the federal agency.

This hour, we listen back to our recent conversation with Horan.

It’s the latest in WNPR’s “Making Her Story” series, highlighting prominent women with ties to Connecticut.

Sisosmme / Creative Commons

Having babies is something we're supposed to do - even though few of us know anything about parenting until we're deep in the game. 

Joe Gratz / flickr creative commons

For an American Sign Language-interpreted version click here.

Since 1989, more than 2,000 people have been identified as victims of wrongful convictions in the U.S. In 2015 and 2016, the wrongfully convicted were exonerated at a rate of about three per week.

This hour, a look at the reality of, psychology behind, and institutionalized pressures toward wrongful convictions in America.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

U.S. Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty apologized​ Thursday​ ​for failing to dismiss​ Tony Baker, her former Chief of Staff, after learning that Anna Kain, a former aide who once dated Baker, filed serious allegations against him for sexual harassment and death threats.

Library of Congress

This hour: As Women's History Month draws to a close, we draw attention to a Connecticut native who was integral in the campaign for civil rights -- Judge Constance Baker Motley.

Coming up, we take an in-depth look at Judge Motley's life and talk about her legacy both inside and outside of the courtroom.

Plus: Suzan-Lori Parks’ Father Comes Home From the Wars Parts 1, 2 & 3 opened at Yale Repertory Theatre earlier this month.

We learn more about the production and find out how the Theatre’s ongoing WILL POWER! initiative is exposing students to the arts. 

Dying In Prison

Mar 27, 2018
Rennett Stowe / Creative Commons

"Compassionate release" of our sickest and oldest prisoners is a way to reduce the federal prison population. It's also meant to save on the high cost of health care for aging inmates, and show some -  well, compassion, to prisoners closing in on the end of their lives. 

Fibonacci Blue / Creative Commons

A lot has happened in the recent days. The news is fast, complicated, disturbing and in some cases, hopeful.

Gov. Malloy outlines juvenile justice proposals. Behind him, left to right, University of New Haven President Steven Kaplan, Commissioner Scott Semple, Sheriff Steven Tompkins, and Connecticut Juvenile Justice Alliance Executive Director Abby Anderson.
Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

Governor Dannel Malloy has sponsored two bills aimed at increasing protections for low-risk, young adults in the criminal justice system.

The legal retail of marijuana in Massachusetts begins July 1. That’s prompted Connecticut lawmakers to once again consider legislation to allow the sale of marijuana in the state. Similar legislation failed last year.

Allen Allen / Creative Commons

The Connecticut House voted to approve Connecticut Supreme Court Justice Andrew McDonald to be chief justice Monday by one vote. The next stop is the Senate, where Republicans will have a one-vote majority after Democratic lawmaker Gayle Slossberg recused herself last week. 

DmyTo / iStock

March 6, 2018 marks the 20th anniversary of the deadly rampage at the Connecticut Lottery Corporation headquarters. The incident prompted the state’s gun-seizure law, making Connecticut the first state to enact such a measure.

Yale University
Pixabay

College campuses continue to be unsafe for women. Its estimated that one in five female students will be sexually assaulted during her time in college. It’s a disturbingly common problem, yet so few of the accused perpetrators end up facing criminal charges. 

Library of Congress

Chances are you’ve never heard of Constance Baker Motley.

Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks, and Thurgood Marshall are all known for their historic work in the Civil Rights Movement, but Motley -- who was right there with them -- isn’t. 

Library of Congress

This hour: As Black History Month draws to a close, we draw attention to a Connecticut native who was integral in the campaign for civil rights -- Judge Constance Baker Motley.

Coming up, we take an in-depth look at Judge Motley's life and talk about her legacy both inside and outside of the courtroom.

Plus: Suzan-Lori Parks’ Father Comes Home From the Wars Parts 1, 2 & 3 opens at Yale Repertory Theatre next month.

We learn more about the production and find out how the Theatre’s ongoing WILL POWER! initiative is exposing students to the arts. 

Lorie Shaull (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Grading on the post-2016 scale, it was a relatively earth shattering revelation-free weekend. And so we have some time to regroup and take a look at more iterative developments in Mueller investigation- and Parkland-adjacent news.

Lenna Utro-Shterenberg / Creative Commons

Robert Mueller on Friday indicted 13 Russian nationals and three organizations on charges related to interference in the 2016 U.S. electoral process. 

Charles Bulfinch / Creative Commons

Legend holds that years after the the Hartford Convention, a visitor from the South was touring the Old State House and asked to be shown the room where the Convention met. Ushered into the Senate chamber, the southerner looked at the crimson in the face of George Washington in the Gilbert Stuart portrait hanging here and said, "I'll be damned if he's got the blush off yet."

Delete Flickr

The word bastard hasn't always been meant to offend. Used simply as an indication of illegitimate birth at first, the label bastard didn't bring with it shame or stigmatization until long after it first appeared in the Middle Ages.

White House / Wikimedia Commons

Special counsel Robert Mueller has already charged several people associated with the Trump campaign with crimes uncovered in his investigation into Russian interference in our 2016 presidential election. Yet, some some believe there's a good chance he won't indict President Trump - even if he finds wrongdoing. 

TonyNetone / Creative Commons

The central question in Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation is whether a foreign agent interfered in our electoral process and whether the Trump campaign colluded in that effort. 

WSAR - Own work/creative commons

Columbia, South Carolina is one of the first cities to ban the use of gun bump stocks - an attachment that enables a semiautomatic rifle to fire faster. 

Rod Waddington / Creative Commons

Five years ago, 20 first graders and six adults were gunned down at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut. Following the massacre, the state enacted some of the toughest gun laws in the nation.

Lori Mack/WNPR

The East Haven police department has acquired a new piece of equipment to protect one of its most valued employees. 

Jeffrey Smith / Creative Commons

On the eve of the latest report into traffic stops and racial profiling in the state, The Connecticut Police Chiefs Association released a peer-reviewed study that questions the report's methodology.

jglazer75 / Creative Commons

On Friday at 5:00 pm, the Connecticut Public Affairs Network stopped its operations of CT-N, a network founded in 1999 to independently cover all three branches of state government.

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