law | Connecticut Public Radio
WNPR

law

miss_millions / flickr creative commons

"Hate" is the imprecise word we use to describe a group of ideas that have moved out of the shadows of American public life and into its center ring.

At the core of these movements sits one common idea: that all people are not equal.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

On January 31, 2018, Kristin and Mike Song's 15-year-old son Ethan Song, accidentally shot and killed himself at his friend's house. They were handling a gun they knew was kept in a bedroom closet. The gun was one of three guns owned by the friend's father. They were in a cardboard box inside a tupperware container that was hidden in a bedroom closet. The guns had locks but the keys and ammunition were in the same box. 

AP Photo / Pablo Martinez Monsivais

The number of Americans supporting the impeachment of President Donald Trump has leveled off, according to a recent pol from the Quinnipiac University poll.

nathanmac87 / Flickr Creative Commons

Cities and towns have laws to keep people from engaging in behavior that may disturb others, like sleeping on park benches, drinking in public, or just plain “loitering”.

What does it mean when just hanging out in a public space puts you in violation of these laws?

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

The Supreme Court begins a new session Monday. It will be the first full term since the more conservative Justice Brett Kavanaugh replaced the retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy.

Max Pixel

A number of laws from the last legislative session went into effect Tuesday, including a tobacco ban for consumers under the age of 21.

Ryan Caron King / Flickr

A lot has happened since House Speaker Nancy Pelosi initiated an impeachment inquiry against President Trump last week after learning that Trump asked Ukrainian president Volodymyr Velensky to interfere in the 2020 election.

DonkeyHotey / Wikimedia Commons

Impeachment. It's a word that has come to dominate the headlines, with the announcement of an “official impeachment inquiry” into U.S. President Donald Trump.

But just what is impeachment?

This hour, we take an in-depth look  and we also hear from you. Do you have a question about the impeachment process? 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

An elections official in Coventry could soon be the subject of a state investigation.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

House Democrats are moving closer to initiating impeachment proceedings against President Trump after he confirmed that he discussed 2020 presidential candidate and political rival Joe Biden, with the Ukrainian president.

The possibility that the president may have subjugated the national interest for personal political gain is a "new chapter of lawlessness," according to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Is this the tipping point for impeachment? What are the implications of seeking to impeach -- or not? 

Kjetil Ree / Flickr

A lawsuit filed in federal court on behalf of two Connecticut workers could be a test of a 2018 landmark Supreme Court ruling on unions.

Kwasi Kyei / Wikimedia Commons

For some single adults and couples, the path to adoption can be winding and difficult. This hour, we take an in-depth look at the realities of open adoption in the U.S.

We also learn about legislative efforts to improve adoptees' access to birth records in Connecticut. And we want to hear from you. Have you adopted, or were you adopted yourself? 

8 New Gun Laws Take Effect In Texas Sept. 1

Sep 1, 2019
Sue Ogrocki / Associated Press

At least seven people were killed and another 20 were injured in a mass shooting that stretched in and around Midland and Odessa, Texas, Saturday. The incident was the second mass shooting in that state in less than a month, following a shooting in El Paso, on Aug. 3.

Blogtrepreneur / Flickr

A Connecticut man is suing a Farmington-based company for lost wages and benefits after the business reportedly closed down without notifying employees.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Attorneys general from several U.S. states, including Connecticut, have allied in opposition to new Trump administration rules that target immigrants. This hour, we sit down with Connecticut Attorney General William Tong to learn more. 

Murphy Gives Gun Background Check Bill "Less Than 50-50" Odds

Aug 25, 2019
Chion Wolf / WNPR

Sen. Chris Murphy on Friday said any attempt by Congress to approve a bill expanding FBI background checks of gun purchasers has a “less than 50-50” chance of success.

During a press conference in Hartford, Murphy said he spoke with White House legislative staff several times, most recently on Thursday evening, about support for new gun laws in the wake of mass shootings earlier this month in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio.

Murphy said President Donald Trump has wavered since he telephoned the Democratic senator to talk about new gun legislation.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

This hour, we hear about a months-long investigation into allegations of sexual abuse at local Boys & Girls Clubs.

We also learn about reports of a plan to relocate federal detention hearings from Connecticut to Massachusetts. 

And later we ask: How effective are "red-flag" laws at reducing gun violence in the U.S.? 

Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

Thirty-one children have died around the country so far this year as a result of being left alone in hot cars. Senator Richard Blumenthal is endorsing a bill aimed at preventing these deaths. He said Monday the proposed law will require all auto manufacturers to include technology that alerts drivers to check the rear seat for passengers when a vehicle is turned off. 

Palm Beach County Sheriff's Department / Wikipedia

The FBI, the Justice Department's inspector general and the New York City medical examiner will investigate how billionaire and convicted sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein was found dead in his jail cell at Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan early Saturday morning. 

RMS Companies

A judge has cleared the way for the redevelopment of property surrounding the Hartford baseball stadium of the minor league Yard Goats.

State Gun Groups Aren't Happy Trump Is Supporting Red Flag Laws

Aug 8, 2019
Official White House Photo by Andrea Hanks / Flickr

President Donald Trump likes getting a reaction from his base, though maybe not the one he’s getting this week. After Trump expressed support for certain gun control measures, some of his staunchest allies in the gun rights community say they may abandon a man they once saw as their best hope for expanding gun rights.

What Is A Red Flag Law?

Aug 5, 2019
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Among the popular gun policy proposals raised in the aftermath of shootings like those in Sandy Hook, Parkland and now El Paso and Dayton, the call for “red flag” laws has become a common refrain.

But like universal background checks and closing the “gun show loophole”, “red flag” laws aren’t self-explanatory.

Vaping 360 / Flickr

The state of Connecticut is launching an investigation into how one e-cigarette brand is marketed.

Attorney General William Tong announced on Wednesday that he’s sent a ‘civil investigative demand’ to Juul Labs Incorporated, the makers of Juul e-liquids.

Kwasi Kyei / Wikimedia Commons

For some single adults and couples, the path to adoption can be winding and difficult. This hour, we take an in-depth look at the realities of open adoption in the U.S.

We also learn about legislative efforts to improve adoptees' access to birth records in Connecticut. And we want to hear from you. Have you adopted, or were you adopted yourself? 

Then-FBI Director Robert Mueller meeting with President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden in the White House.
Pete Souza / White House

Special Counsel Robert Mueller made crystal clear that he would not comment on the long-awaited Mueller Report beyond the carefully chosen words we could all find in his 448-page report. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

As oral arguments were being heard Tuesday by the U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in Louisiana in a multi-state lawsuit that seeks to invalidate the Affordable Care Act, Connecticut senators at the Capitol in Washington, D.C., were making the case as to why Americans need the federal health care law.

Sen. Chris Murphy said eliminating the ACA without any replacement plan in place would result in a “humanitarian catastrophe.”

Meredith Longo / Playhouse on Park

The Scottsboro Boys were arrested as freight train hoboes in Alabama in 1931 and quickly convicted by an all-white jury of raping two white women. After several retrials and appeals, the case led to two landmark Supreme Court rulings on the right to adequate counsel and prohibiting the exclusion of black people from juries.

FRANKIE GRAZIANO / CONNECTICUT PUBLIC RADIO

Newly released emails and documents from an unsealed multi-state lawsuit against major generic drug manufacturers show correspondence between company leaders on drug price increases, Congressional investigations and more.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

The United States Court House building in Hartford is home to an office of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement or ICE, which has recently been directed by President Donald Trump and his administration to carry out mass raids and deportations in major cities of undocumented immigrants.

Keith Allison / Creative Commons

In a tweet earlier this week, President Trump wrote that Immigration and Customs Enforcement will soon begin deporting millions of undocumented citizens.

Pages