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An analysis of the Republicans’ latest attempt to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act claims that the effect on Connecticut could be severe. According to one estimate, the state stands to lose about $4 billion in federal funding in 2027, when the bill’s temporary block grant system would expire. 

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We spend over three trillion dollars on health care every year and we have worse outcomes than any other developed country - all of which spend on average about half of what America spends per person. 

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Customers on Connecticut’s health care exchange will be facing double digit rate increases next year, but the state’s insurance commissioner said Wednesday she’s hopeful there might be some relief in sight. 

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Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal stood beside Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders and 15 others Wednesday in Washington D.C. as Sanders introduced his “Medicare For All” bill.

Access Health CT

Connecticut’s health care exchange will once again have two insurers offering plans next year, a welcome relief for Access Health Connecticut, which has been on shifting sands since the election of Donald Trump as president. 

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Insurance companies are still in the midst of settling claims from Hurricane Harvey. Now they must prepare for possibly an even bigger impact from Irma. 

Randy Bresnik / NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Insurers are among those deploying teams to communities affected by Hurricane Harvey. Travelers, which has its property casualty lines based in Hartford, has dispatched three mobile claims centers to the state. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Health insurer Aetna has admitted it inadvertently revealed the HIV status of some of its customers in a paper mailing last month. 

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Hartford has long been known as the insurance capital of the world, but will that change now that insurance giant, Aetna, is moving its headquarters out of the state?

This hour, we examine the past and future of insurance in Connecticut — and beyond.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini has a message for Washington, as the uncertainty over health care reform continues. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The U.S Senate recently rejected a number of Republican plans to repeal, replace, or just overhaul the Affordable Care Act. But the health care debate is far from settled.

Senate Republicans don't appear to be too worried about President Trump's latest round of threats.

Updated 4:21 p.m. ET Aug. 1

Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., announced today that the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions committee will hold bipartisan hearings on ways to stabilize the Affordable Care Act marketplaces for 2018.

The hearings will start the week of Sept. 4. Their aim is to act by Sept. 27, when insurers must sign contracts to sell individual insurance plans on HealthCare.gov for 2018.

In a moment of unexpected high drama, Republicans were stymied once again in their effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act — and they have John McCain to thank for it.

In the early morning hours Friday, the senator showed why he earned the nickname "Maverick" over his long tenure.

Betting that thin is in — and might be the only way forward — Senate Republicans are eyeing a "skinny repeal" that would roll back an unpopular portion of the federal health law. But health policy analysts warn that the idea has been tried before, and with little success.

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Republicans in Washington finally got closer to the goal they’ve had for about seven years - the repeal and replacement of Obamacare. Well, at least the repeal part.

The Affordable Care Act is not "exploding" or "imploding," as President Trump likes to claim. But Trump does hold several keys to sabotaging the insurance marketplaces, should he so choose — one of which his administration is reportedly weighing using.

The Republican scramble to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act has yielded yet another version of a health care overhaul bill, along with yet another score from the Congressional Budget Office — the second analysis from the nonpartisan agency in two days.

President Trump has summoned all Senate Republicans to the White House on Wednesday for a debrief on the state of health care legislation effort in their chamber. Based on the week so far, the meeting may be more like a post mortem.

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Now that the Senate Republican health care bill has collapsed, the next step may be to vote on an outright repeal -- though that plan also faces political hurdles. But were the repeal to happen, it could have serious consequences for state residents.

Updated at 2:40 p.m. ET

Hours after a replacement for the Affordable Care Act was all but scuttled by a clutch of Senate Republicans, three lawmakers appear to have doomed Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's Plan B: Repeal the Affordable Care Act without replacing it.

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET

The defeat of the GOP Senate health care bill is a major blow to all Republicans involved.

President Trump, whose approval rating is lower than any recent president this early in his term, is now staring at an agenda imperiled. Despite his boasts, he has achieved little of significance through Congress. That failure is compounded by the fact that his party controls both chambers.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Connecticut U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal said Democrats remain implacably opposed to the Republicans’ latest version of health care reform. A rewritten bill was released Thursday, in an effort to bring on board wavering senators from both conservative and moderate wings of the Republican party. 

Updated 6:56 p.m. ET

Senate Republicans on Thursday released a revised version of the Better Care Reconciliation Act, their plan to replace the Affordable Care Act.

The next few days will be critical for Senate Republicans' effort to repeal and replace key parts of the Affordable Care Act. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell will release a new version of the bill Thursday, and aims to hold a key vote on it early next week.

If that process fails, McConnell has floated the idea of working with Democrats on a bipartisan measure. "No action is not an alternative," he said in Kentucky during the July 4th recess. "We've got the insurance markets imploding all over the country."

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Congress is debating legislation to change the way Americans receive health care and how much they pay. Use this Q&A from NPR, which includes reporting from WNPR, to explore how the bill would affect insurance coverage in Connecticut.

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More than 60 experts in the field of opioid addiction have voiced their opposition to the Senate’s version of health care reform. One of those signing a statement opposing the bill is a professor at the Yale School of Public Health. 

No corner of the health care system would be harder hit than Medicaid, the federal-state health insurance program for the poor, if Republican leaders in Congress round up the votes to repeal major portions of the Affordable Care Act.

GOP lawmakers have proposed winding down the Medicaid expansion that added 17 million people in 31 states and the District of Columbia under the ACA, and also eventually capping the program's spending per capita.

The Affordable Care Act isn't perfect. Even proponents of the law would agree with that.

In many parts of the country, there is only one insurer in the individual markets — and in a few, there are zero. Premiums have spiked, sending some people on the insurance exchanges hunting for new plans.

When Senate Republican leaders delayed the vote on their bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., was quick to not declare victory.

"We're not resting on any laurels, nor do we feel any sense yet of accomplishment," Schumer said at his weekly press conference, shortly after the surprise GOP decision to punt on a vote. "Other than we are making progress, because the American people are listening to our arguments."

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