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Jim Henkens

We have a complicated relationship with our food. We need food to live; yet, we've become removed from the food we eat and how it's grown and processed.  Even with the best of intentions, today's ultra-processed foods make it hard for us to know exactly what we're eating or how the methods used to mass produce our food are affecting our environment and our health. And I haven't even touched on how food has led to war, famine, poverty, and enslavement.    

Joe Mabel / Wikimedia Commons

If you own or rent a home that is older than 1978, you have to assume there is some lead in it. Lead is not be used in paint anymore, but the lead that exists in older homes can still be dangerous.

This hour, we talk about lead poisoning and the risks it poses to children. Coming up, we hear what homeowners and renters need to know about lead in their homes.

Nicolas Boullosa / Creative Commons

One of the few silver linings of the pandemic has been a resurgence of interest in motels and RV life from a diverse group of millennials who want safe and less expensive options to travel and work during a pandemic.

And motels and RV companies are trying to meet the demand with upgrades and amenities like flat-screen TVs, memory-foam mattresses, and free Wi-Fi.

Some are turning to RV life permanently to travel, live, and work from where they want instead of being tethered to a desk and real estate. The pandemic has shown us that millennials who have never known the security of stable jobs or home ownership feel more "at home" outside traditional places.

Mike Mozart / Flickr

How often do you buy new clothing?

Stores like H&M and Forever 21 sell new styles at low prices, making it easy to constantly update your wardrobe. But, this hour, we listen back to a conversation about the environmental and social costs of "fast fashion". 

Want To Read Ned Lamont’s Playbook? Start Here.

Oct 29, 2019
Courtesy: Governor's Office

Gov. Ned Lamont engaged in two of his favorite pastimes Tuesday: Drawing boldface corporate CEOs, academics and philanthropists into public-private partnerships, and tilting at the silos he believes prevent government agencies from working efficiently in common cause.

Wonderlane / Creative Commons

When Kyle Zimmer started working in the construction industry 40 years ago, he said health and safety standards focused on reducing injuries and fatalities from electrical hazards, falls and a lack of protective gear.  

But today, he said the focus needs to be on addiction, suicide prevention and behavioral health.

This month marks 20 years since General Electric Co. signed an agreement to clean up PCBs the company had dumped in Pittsfield, Massachusetts.

Courtesy: Techstars

The latest class of start-up companies being fostered by Stanley Black & Decker at its Hartford accelerator will show off their innovations Monday, in an event the company calls Demo Day

Madyson Frame / NEXT

Officials from the National Park Service gave an update this week on the status of the Coltsville National Historical Park in Hartford, a tribute to Samuel Colt and his role in the firearms industry as well as the Industrial Revolution. Congress approved the park in 2014, but it's far from complete.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Saturday, July 20th marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing. Several Connecticut companies played an important role in the historic mission.

82 year-old Donald Rethke was a mechanical engineer at Hamilton Standard in Windsor Locks in 1969. He helped design the life support systems and the heating system on the lunar module used in the moon landing.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

Last fall, after United Technologies Corp. announced it would spin off its Otis Elevator and Carrier divisions, then Governor-elect Ned Lamont vowed he would watch the Farmington-based conglomerate "like a hawk" to retain its workforce in Connecticut.

But this weekend's news that UTC would merge with Raytheon Co., and move its headquarters to Waltham, MA., came with little advanced notice to the Lamont administration.

Elise Amendola / Associated Press

Massachusetts state officials are pleased that another high tech company is being lured away from Connecticut, and will set up headquarters in the Bay State. Raytheon Technologies Corp. — formed from the proposed merger of Waltham-based Raytheon and Connecticut-based United Technologies — would be headquartered in Greater Boston, the companies said. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Some workers at Pratt & Whitney say they're unconcerned over the merger of Pratt's parent, United Technologies, with Massachusetts-based Raytheon. UTC has said it will move its headquarters out of Connecticut for the first time in its history, if the merger closes as expected next year. 

Jessica Hill / Associated Press

In a surprise announcement, Farmington-based United Technologies said Sunday evening it’s merging with another aerospace giant, Raytheon. The combined company's headquarters will be in Raytheon's home state of Massachusetts, marking the seismic loss of a homegrown giant for Connecticut.

Dean Hochman / flickr.com/photos/deanhochman/

We're doing a show on supermarkets today - from a supermarket!

Most Americans still buy most of their food from a supermarket. While farmer's markets and specialty stores offer organic and local alternatives, large-scale supermarkets still offer more convenience, the lowest prices and a seemingly endless variety of choices. Their big wide aisles with neatly stacked and eye-catching packaged products are hard to resist. 

Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut’s insurance industry has been taking stock of its year, and a new report says the state should still pride itself on being the insurance capital of the world.

Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

Governor Dannel Malloy faced many challenges in his eight year tenure. While the state budget crisis may have grabbed the headlines, other structural issues with Connecticut’s economy also consumed his attention. One of the biggest of these - the skills gap. 

Dean Hochman / Creative Commons

We're doing a show on supermarkets today - from a supermarket!

Most Americans still buy most of their food from a supermarket. While farmer's markets and specialty stores offer organic and local alternatives, large-scale supermarkets still offer more convenience, the lowest prices and a seemingly endless variety of choices. Their big wide aisles with neatly stacked and eye-catching packaged products are hard to resist. 

ctvisit.com

Connecticut House Speaker Joe Aresimowicz has convened what's described as a blue ribbon panel on tourism in the state.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

Farmington-based conglomerate United Technologies has announced it will break itself up into three separate companies. The breakup, which had been signaled for months, follows the closing of a massive deal to buy aerospace systems maker Rockwell Collins.

Farnborough International Air Show

Small and midsize Connecticut aerospace companies are once again planning to make their presence felt at Europe’s largest air show this summer. 

Hartford Stage
Courtesy Hartford Stage

Several studies reveal that millennials are not attending live arts performances at the same rate as other age groups. This does not bode well for the future of arts organizations, which have to rely more and more on the patronage of an increasingly aging audience to make ends meet.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

United States Senator Chris Murphy told employees of the Mazak Corporation in Windsor Locks Monday that a re-industrialization of America is afoot. He’s excited about Connecticut’s manufacturing jobs outlook, but he said that even more jobs can be had if the Pentagon makes a deeper commitment to “buy American.”

Spartacon3000 / Wikimedia Commons

The USDA recently proposed recommendations that would require foodmakers to label their products if they contain genetically modified ingredients.

Genetically modified crops have been portrayed as everything from a dangerous health risk to a miracle solution to tackle world food shortages. But among all this debate, many of us may not really know what a “genetically modified organism” (GMO) even is.

This hour, we ask: what does it actually mean for food to be genetically modified, and should we care if it is?

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Governor Dannel Malloy is hoping to position the state as a hub for the expanding offshore wind farm industry. There are currently seven offshore wind projects in the planning pipeline for the Northeast.

Jamie / Creative Commons

This hour: the deadly reality of counterfeit drugs. We discuss the history and proliferation of fake pharmaceuticals with Dr. Muhammad Zaman, author of Bitter Pills: The Global War on Counterfeit Drugs, and consider their impact both internationally and at home. 

Also: a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention outlines an alarming trend in the U.S. -- fleas, ticks, and mosquitos are on the rise. But what, exactly, is driving the increase? And what does it mean for public health?

Spartacon3000 / Wikimedia Commons

The USDA recently proposed recommendations that would require foodmakers to label their products if they contain genetically modified ingredients.

Genetically modified crops have been portrayed as everything from a dangerous health risk to a miracle solution to tackle world food shortages. But among all this debate, many of us may not really know what a “genetically modified organism” (GMO) even is.

This hour, we ask: what does it actually mean for food to be genetically modified, and should we care if it is?

Colin Dunn / Creative Commons

A mosaic of boldly colored labels and brightly lit bottles, the vitamin aisle is as much a drug store staple as it is a monument to a multi-billion dollar industry. This hour, we trace the history of dietary supplement sales in the U.S. and consider why these supplements remain so popular today. 

Arthur Caranta / Flickr

They may not look like R2D2 or BB8, but in 2018, robots are an important part of our world.

This hour we talk about ​automation—new advances in “smart” technology during a period of time that’s been dubbed the “Fourth Industrial Revolution.”

Arthur Caranta / Flickr

They may not look like R2D2 or BB8, but in 2018, robots are an important part of our world.

This hour we talk about ​automation—new advances in “smart” technology during a period of time that’s been dubbed the “Fourth Industrial Revolution.”

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