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Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The attorney for a Hartford woman recently released from immigration detention says she’s received notice that federal homeland security officials intend to appeal a recent decision in her client’s favor. 

Lori Mack / CT Public Radio

Mario Aguilar Castanon, formerly threatened with deportation, has been granted asylum by the U.S. Immigration Court in Boston. After a delay during which it appeared he might be kept in detention pending an appeal by ICE, the teenager was released and returned home.

Courtesy: Thompson Family

State officials and immigration attorneys in Connecticut are welcoming a ruling last week by the federal Board of Immigration Appeals that clarifies its position on the state’s pardon power. The BIA says it will now honor Connecticut’s pardons. That means Hartford resident Wayzaro Walton will be able to regain her legal status and avoid deportation from the U.S. 

Gage Skidmore / Flickr Creative Commons

Today we speak with actor and human-rights activist George Takei, not about his role as Lieutenant Sulu on the original Star Trek, but about a far more troubling chapter in his life. In his new graphic memoir They Called Us Enemy, George writes in detail about his childhood spent in an internment camp for Japanese-American citizens.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The federal Board of Immigration Appeals has indicated it will now recognize pardons issued by the state of Connecticut, according to the attorney for a Hartford woman previously threatened with deportation. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Wayzaro Walton was released from federal detention Wednesday and will be reunited with her wife and daughter. 

Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

Since ICE took her husband away, Madina Mamadjonova said life has been a nightmare.

She’s trying to support her family, Mamadjonova said Tuesday, but she can’t be both a “mother and father” to their three children. The youngest, a son named Ibrohim, is nearly 2 years old -- that’s about how long Bakhodir Madjitov has been detained by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Deborah Bigelow walked into the Lyceum Conference Center in Hartford on a recent Thursday night prepared with a stack of folders and documents.

She hoped that by the time she left the Access Health Connecticut enrollment fair after speaking with a specialist, her health insurance plan for 2020 would be set, because not having coverage wasn’t an option.

Scott Wheeler was born and raised in what's known as the Northeast Kingdom, the rugged and beautiful countryside where Vermont abuts Canada. Even so, he didn't realize he was supposed to check in with Canadian immigration authorities when driving across the border recently.

Two polite, officious Mounties tell him to make a U-turn and follow them back to the port of entry where he's questioned about his intentions inside Quebec. He explains his mistake, and eventually, the Mounties return his identification and he's free to go.

John Atashian

The nonprofit Judy Dworin Performance Project harnesses the arts to build social awareness, staging performances that draw on issues ranging from incarceration to immigration.

And it has been doing this for 30 years.

This hour, we sit down with Judy Dworin to reflect on this milestone. We also talk with performers and colleagues, and we hear from you, too. How has the Judy Dworin Performance Project touched your life?

On the morning of Aug. 7, Tony McGee was driving to work in Morton, Miss., when he noticed something unusual happening at one of the local chicken processing plants.

McGee is superintendent of the county schools, and it was the second day of classes.

"There was some activity there with law enforcement that had the parking lot barricaded," he recalls. "I actually called one of our assistant superintendents because it's relatively close to the school."

Ryan Martins / Connecticut Public Radio

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments Tuesday in a case that could be pivotal for hundreds of thousands of young people covered by the DACA program, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

About 800,000 young undocumented immigrants have benefited from the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, since its inception in 2012, but now many of them are living and going to school in the U.S. with their status in doubt.

Courtesy: Cristian Padilla Romero

The United States Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday in a challenge to the Trump administration’s decision to end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, a program that shields young immigrants from deportation and allows them to work legally in the U.S. 

Courtesy: Cristian Padilla Romero

The mother of a Yale University doctoral student is being sent back to a detention facility in Georgia after nearly being deported Sunday night by Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement / Flickr

An undocumented Honduran immigrant living in Connecticut is suing several federal agencies, alleging that she was sexually assaulted multiple times by an Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent.

Jade Allen / Connecticut Public Radio

A New Haven woman previously under threat of deportation to her native Bangladesh has been granted asylum in the United States, according to her son. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The state of Connecticut is suing the Department of Homeland Security and other federal agencies over a refusal to honor the state’s pardon system when it comes to immigration. 

Tom Hines

Ocean Vuong emigrated to Hartford from Vietnam when he was two-years-old. His family brought with them the trauma of an American-led war that ravaged their people and their culture. How do they retain their culture and assimilate into one that doesn't want them? 

Robin Lubbock / WBUR

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) now says it will reopen certain medical deferred action cases, including for a number of Boston-area immigrants who previously received denial letters.

The announcement comes after a tumultuous week in which federal agencies contradicted one another and severely ill patients feared a total end to the humanitarian process that allows immigrants to remain longer in the U.S. while they receive medical treatment.

Lamont On Immigration: 'I Feel A Lot More Urgency'

Sep 6, 2019
Connecticut Public Radio

Gov. Ned Lamont was told Thursday that fears about a Trump administration rule permitting homeland security officials to deny green cards to legal immigrants who accept public assistance already are rippling through this city of immigrants, weeks before its effective date. 

Connecticut's 2nd District representative Joe Courtney says the Trump administration's transfer of $3.6 billion from military construction projects to pay for more of the wall along the southern U.S. border sets a "dangerous and irresponsible" precedent. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A federal appeals court in New York City heard arguments Tuesday centering, in large part, on whether Immigration and Customs Enforcement has the right to deport an immigrant for past crimes, even though she’s been granted a full and unconditional pardon by the state of Connecticut. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A federal appeals court in New York City will hear arguments today on whether Immigration and Customs Enforcement has the right to deport an immigrant for past crimes, even though her record has been cleared by the state of Connecticut.

Connecticut Attorney General William Tong is expected to defend the legitimacy of the state’s pardons.

After Tragedy In El Paso, A Special Visa Could Provide Some Survivors A Glimmer Of Hope

Aug 30, 2019
The makeshift memorial for the victims of the Aug. 3, 2019, shooting outside the Walmart in El Paso, Texas.
Stella M Chávez / KERA News

Leer en español.

On Aug. 3, 2019, a shooter at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, took the lives of 22, injured over two dozen and changed a whole community. The shooting was the worst targeting Latinx in modern U.S. history.

But as some survivors begin to process the horror, there might be a glimmer of hope: Those without a green card may now be eligible for a special visa, designed to protect crime victims.

Dismaying immigrants and advocates, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) sent out letters saying the agency will no longer consider most deferrals of deportation for people with serious medical conditions, documents show. 

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement / Flickr

Connecticut Attorney General William Tong is fighting recent immigration policy put forth by the Trump Administration.

Last week, Tong joined 17 other attorneys general in opposing the implementation of expedited removal. 

Who Gets To Become a U.S. Citizen?

Aug 26, 2019
Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Attorneys general from several U.S. states, including Connecticut, have allied in opposition to new Trump administration rules that target immigrants. This hour, we sit down with Connecticut Attorney General William Tong to learn more. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut’s Attorney General said Wednesday he’s joining New York and Vermont in bringing a lawsuit against the Trump administration over immigrants’ access to public benefits because the government’s actions are damaging to this state’s economy and communities. 

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Today we speak with actor and human-rights activist George Takei, not about his role as Lieutenant Sulu on the original Star Trek, but about a far more troubling chapter in his life. In his new graphic memoir They Called Us Enemy, George writes in detail about his childhood spent in an internment camp for Japanese-American citizens.

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