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Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut’s Attorney General said Wednesday he’s joining New York and Vermont in bringing a lawsuit against the Trump administration over immigrants’ access to public benefits because the government’s actions are damaging to this state’s economy and communities. 

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Today we speak with actor and human-rights activist George Takei, not about his role as Lieutenant Sulu on the original Star Trek, but about a far more troubling chapter in his life. In his new graphic memoir They Called Us Enemy, George writes in detail about his childhood spent in an internment camp for Japanese-American citizens.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

This hour, we hear about a months-long investigation into allegations of sexual abuse at local Boys & Girls Clubs.

We also learn about reports of a plan to relocate federal detention hearings from Connecticut to Massachusetts. 

And later we ask: How effective are "red-flag" laws at reducing gun violence in the U.S.? 

Charles Reed / U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement via AP

Connecticut residents held in ICE detention suddenly have hearings scheduled hours away in Boston immigration court, rather than in Hartford. Immigration lawyers and U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut want answers. 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut Attorney General William Tong is among the state's public officials vowing to fight the Trump administration's latest anti-immigrantion measure. It's one that would broaden the definition of "public charge" and could be used to block green cards or legal citizenship to those deemed impoverished enough to require government assistance.

"Give me your tired and your poor who can stand on their own two feet and who will not become a public charge," Ken Cuccinelli, the acting director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, said Tuesday, twisting Emma Lazarus' famous words on a bronze plaque at the Statue of Liberty.

Jimmy Aldaoud was deported from the U.S. in June to Iraq, a country that his family said he had never set foot in. Two months after he arrived there, his family got word that he was found dead in Baghdad.

Aldaoud was born in Greece, his sister Mary Bolis said, after his family fled Iraq. He didn't speak Arabic.

He was 41 when he died, and he arrived legally in the U.S. in May 1979 when he was a year old, his lawyer, Chris Schaedig, said. He lived near Detroit until he was put on a plane to Najaf by U.S. federal officials.

Dans / Wikimedia Commons

Constantin Mutu was four-months-old when he was separated from his father, Vasily. The elder Mutu was arrested while seeking asylum at the southern border. So far, Constantin is the youngest child to be separated from his family.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A federal appeals court in Boston heard arguments Tuesday centering on whether Immigration and Customs Enforcement can deport immigrants even though they’ve been granted a state pardon for past crimes. 

Wayzaro Walton (middle, pictured at a rally organized on her behalf in Hartford in December 2018) was apprehended by federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents on Tuesday, March 26 while participating in an immigration check-in.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A federal court in Boston hears arguments Tuesday that will center, in part, on whether Immigration and Customs Enforcement has the right to deport immigrants for past crimes - despite a state pardon.

Tom Hines

Ocean Vuong emigrated to Hartford from Vietnam when he was two-years-old. His family brought with them the trauma of an American-led war that ravaged their people and their culture. How do they retain their culture and assimiliate into one that doesn't want them?  

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut's five U.S. Representatives stood with their Democratic colleagues and four Republicans Tuesday in rebuking President Donald Trump for his Twitter attacks against a group of minority congresswomen who have become known as "The Squad."

Now what?

Jade Allen / Connecticut Public Radio

The case of New Haven woman Salma Sikandar remains in limbo after a hearing before an immigration judge Monday. Sikander, who’s originally from Bangladesh, is subject to a deportation order, but her attorney is arguing for clemency. So far it is unclear when the judge will give the ruling.

Professor Bop / Creative Commons

It appears Connecticut -- along with the rest of the country -- was spared massive ICE raids over the weekend that had been promised by President Trump. But advocates for immigrants' rights say the administration's stance is still having a marked effect.

Lynne Sladky / Associated Press

Connecticut Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro says the federal government must do more to move migrant children out of crowded detention centers. DeLauro spoke after touring the Homestead Temporary Influx Facility in Florida Monday, with several of her Democratic colleagues from the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health, Human Services and Education. 

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement / Flickr

For weeks, undocumented communities braced themselves for large-scale immigration raids targeting those who live here illegally.

President Trump had announced these roundups would take place across the country over the weekend. This hour, we hear what actually happened. 

Keith Allison / Creative Commons

Families in Connecticut and across the country who are here illegally are bracing for raids this weekend, as agents with Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, are expected to target some 2,000 people with deportation orders in at least 10 cities.

Even though the names of Connecticut cities have not been circulated as targets, families here are still worried about being separated.

Customs and Border Protection has launched an investigation into a secret Facebook group for current and former Border Patrol agents in which members posted derogatory remarks targeting migrants and lawmakers.

More than 200 migrant children detained in a remote Border Patrol station in southwest Texas without adequate food, water and sanitation have been moved after news of the conditions became public last week.

"This morning, my office was informed that only 30 children remain in the Clint Border Patrol station in El Paso County," Rep. Veronica Escobar tweeted Monday. She said that last week lawyers for Human Rights Watch had "found 255 children in beyond alarming conditions."

Lauren Smith / Connecticut Public Radio

Despite President Donald Trump’s recent announcement that he would delay large-scale raids nationwide, immigration advocates say that in Connecticut, detentions of undocumented residents by Immigration and Customs Enforcement are still happening.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

The United States Court House building in Hartford is home to an office of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement or ICE, which has recently been directed by President Donald Trump and his administration to carry out mass raids and deportations in major cities of undocumented immigrants.

Keith Allison / Creative Commons

In a tweet earlier this week, President Trump wrote that Immigration and Customs Enforcement will soon begin deporting millions of undocumented citizens.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A West Hartford man who sought refuge from deportation in a Meriden church has left sanctuary.

Conn. Senate Passes Bill Restricting Cooperation With ICE

May 15, 2019
Sen. Gary Winfield, left, defends the immigration bill. At right is an opponent, Sen. John Kissel.
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

Connecticut jumped back into the contentious national debate over immigration enforcement as Senate Democrats voted early Wednesday to pass a bill that would further restrict how police and court personnel can work with federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement to detain undocumented immigrants.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

When Rabbi Philip Lazowski was just eleven years old, the Nazis invaded his hometown and began the mass slaughter of Jewish residents.

This hour we sit down with Rabbi Lazowski, a Holocaust survivor and longtime leader in the Greater Hartford Jewish community, to hear his story. After witnessing one of the worst sides of humanity, how did he maintain his faith and find the strength to help others?

The Iglesia De Dios Pentecostal Church in New Haven, Connecticut was where Nury Chavarria sought sanctuary in 2017.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The state of Connecticut and dozens of towns are mired in a legal standoff with the U.S. Justice Department over millions of dollars in policing grants the Trump administration is withholding from what it considers “sanctuary cities.”

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

An undocumented Hartford woman already in the custody of Immigration and Customs Enforcement has been granted a temporary stay of deportation -- but it's not yet clear if that will allow her to stay in the United States. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

What’s it like to build a house, a family, a life… and then have a war take it all away?  

This hour we sit down with West Hartford, Connecticut residents Adeebah Alnemar and her son, Naji Aldabaan. They’re Syrian refugees who fled during the civil war, and came to Connecticut in 2016.

Their family is the subject of a 2018 Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoon series in The New York Times. We also talk with one of the people behind the cartoon series—New Haven-based journalist Jake Halpern.

Gregory Bull / Associated Press

President Trump threatened on Friday to close the southern border unless Mexico stops migrants from entering the U.S. illegally.

“Mexico’s tough. They can stop ‘em, but they chose not to," he said. "Now they’re gonna stop ‘em. And if they don’t stop ‘em, we’re closing the border”.

Among those people entering the country are children and teens.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Governor Ned Lamont is asking the federal government to recognize pardons handed down to residents by the state. Lamont wrote a letter to the secretary of the United States Department of Homeland Security after the detention by ICE of an undocumented Hartford woman.

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