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An undocumented Honduran immigrant living in Connecticut is suing several federal agencies, alleging that she was sexually assaulted multiple times by an Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent.

Jade Allen / Connecticut Public Radio

A New Haven woman previously under threat of deportation to her native Bangladesh has been granted asylum in the United States, according to her son. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The state of Connecticut is suing the Department of Homeland Security and other federal agencies over a refusal to honor the state’s pardon system when it comes to immigration. 

Tom Hines

Ocean Vuong emigrated to Hartford from Vietnam when he was two-years-old. His family brought with them the trauma of an American-led war that ravaged their people and their culture. How do they retain their culture and assimilate into one that doesn't want them? 

Robin Lubbock / WBUR

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) now says it will reopen certain medical deferred action cases, including for a number of Boston-area immigrants who previously received denial letters.

The announcement comes after a tumultuous week in which federal agencies contradicted one another and severely ill patients feared a total end to the humanitarian process that allows immigrants to remain longer in the U.S. while they receive medical treatment.

Lamont On Immigration: 'I Feel A Lot More Urgency'

Sep 6, 2019
Connecticut Public Radio

Gov. Ned Lamont was told Thursday that fears about a Trump administration rule permitting homeland security officials to deny green cards to legal immigrants who accept public assistance already are rippling through this city of immigrants, weeks before its effective date. 

Connecticut's 2nd District representative Joe Courtney says the Trump administration's transfer of $3.6 billion from military construction projects to pay for more of the wall along the southern U.S. border sets a "dangerous and irresponsible" precedent. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A federal appeals court in New York City heard arguments Tuesday centering, in large part, on whether Immigration and Customs Enforcement has the right to deport an immigrant for past crimes, even though she’s been granted a full and unconditional pardon by the state of Connecticut. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A federal appeals court in New York City will hear arguments today on whether Immigration and Customs Enforcement has the right to deport an immigrant for past crimes, even though her record has been cleared by the state of Connecticut.

Connecticut Attorney General William Tong is expected to defend the legitimacy of the state’s pardons.

After Tragedy In El Paso, A Special Visa Could Provide Some Survivors A Glimmer Of Hope

Aug 30, 2019
The makeshift memorial for the victims of the Aug. 3, 2019, shooting outside the Walmart in El Paso, Texas.
Stella M Chávez / KERA News

Leer en español.

On Aug. 3, 2019, a shooter at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, took the lives of 22, injured over two dozen and changed a whole community. The shooting was the worst targeting Latinx in modern U.S. history.

But as some survivors begin to process the horror, there might be a glimmer of hope: Those without a green card may now be eligible for a special visa, designed to protect crime victims.

Dismaying immigrants and advocates, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) sent out letters saying the agency will no longer consider most deferrals of deportation for people with serious medical conditions, documents show. 

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement / Flickr

Connecticut Attorney General William Tong is fighting recent immigration policy put forth by the Trump Administration.

Last week, Tong joined 17 other attorneys general in opposing the implementation of expedited removal. 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Attorneys general from several U.S. states, including Connecticut, have allied in opposition to new Trump administration rules that target immigrants. This hour, we sit down with Connecticut Attorney General William Tong to learn more. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut’s Attorney General said Wednesday he’s joining New York and Vermont in bringing a lawsuit against the Trump administration over immigrants’ access to public benefits because the government’s actions are damaging to this state’s economy and communities. 

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Today we speak with actor and human-rights activist George Takei, not about his role as Lieutenant Sulu on the original Star Trek, but about a far more troubling chapter in his life. In his new graphic memoir They Called Us Enemy, George writes in detail about his childhood spent in an internment camp for Japanese-American citizens.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

This hour, we hear about a months-long investigation into allegations of sexual abuse at local Boys & Girls Clubs.

We also learn about reports of a plan to relocate federal detention hearings from Connecticut to Massachusetts. 

And later we ask: How effective are "red-flag" laws at reducing gun violence in the U.S.? 

Charles Reed / U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement via AP

Connecticut residents held in ICE detention suddenly have hearings scheduled hours away in Boston immigration court, rather than in Hartford. Immigration lawyers and U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut want answers. 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut Attorney General William Tong is among the state's public officials vowing to fight the Trump administration's latest anti-immigrantion measure. It's one that would broaden the definition of "public charge" and could be used to block green cards or legal citizenship to those deemed impoverished enough to require government assistance.

"Give me your tired and your poor who can stand on their own two feet and who will not become a public charge," Ken Cuccinelli, the acting director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, said Tuesday, twisting Emma Lazarus' famous words on a bronze plaque at the Statue of Liberty.

Jimmy Aldaoud was deported from the U.S. in June to Iraq, a country that his family said he had never set foot in. Two months after he arrived there, his family got word that he was found dead in Baghdad.

Aldaoud was born in Greece, his sister Mary Bolis said, after his family fled Iraq. He didn't speak Arabic.

He was 41 when he died, and he arrived legally in the U.S. in May 1979 when he was a year old, his lawyer, Chris Schaedig, said. He lived near Detroit until he was put on a plane to Najaf by U.S. federal officials.

Dans / Wikimedia Commons

Constantin Mutu was four-months-old when he was separated from his father, Vasily. The elder Mutu was arrested while seeking asylum at the southern border. So far, Constantin is the youngest child to be separated from his family.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A federal appeals court in Boston heard arguments Tuesday centering on whether Immigration and Customs Enforcement can deport immigrants even though they’ve been granted a state pardon for past crimes. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A federal court in Boston hears arguments Tuesday that will center, in part, on whether Immigration and Customs Enforcement has the right to deport immigrants for past crimes - despite a state pardon.

Tom Hines

Ocean Vuong emigrated to Hartford from Vietnam when he was two-years-old. His family brought with them the trauma of an American-led war that ravaged their people and their culture. How do they retain their culture and assimiliate into one that doesn't want them?  

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut's five U.S. Representatives stood with their Democratic colleagues and four Republicans Tuesday in rebuking President Donald Trump for his Twitter attacks against a group of minority congresswomen who have become known as "The Squad."

Now what?

Jade Allen / Connecticut Public Radio

The case of New Haven woman Salma Sikandar remains in limbo after a hearing before an immigration judge Monday. Sikander, who’s originally from Bangladesh, is subject to a deportation order, but her attorney is arguing for clemency. So far it is unclear when the judge will give the ruling.

Professor Bop / Creative Commons

It appears Connecticut -- along with the rest of the country -- was spared massive ICE raids over the weekend that had been promised by President Trump. But advocates for immigrants' rights say the administration's stance is still having a marked effect.

Lynne Sladky / Associated Press

Connecticut Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro says the federal government must do more to move migrant children out of crowded detention centers. DeLauro spoke after touring the Homestead Temporary Influx Facility in Florida Monday, with several of her Democratic colleagues from the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health, Human Services and Education. 

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement / Flickr

For weeks, undocumented communities braced themselves for large-scale immigration raids targeting those who live here illegally.

President Trump had announced these roundups would take place across the country over the weekend. This hour, we hear what actually happened. 

Keith Allison / Creative Commons

Families in Connecticut and across the country who are here illegally are bracing for raids this weekend, as agents with Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, are expected to target some 2,000 people with deportation orders in at least 10 cities.

Even though the names of Connecticut cities have not been circulated as targets, families here are still worried about being separated.

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