Health Equity and Access Project | Connecticut Public Radio
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Health Equity and Access Project

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The federal health care law was known as Obamacare. And Republicans, including President Trump, campaigned on repealing it.  

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The rate of people without health insurance in rural Connecticut has gone down dramatically since the passage of the Affordable Care Act.

That’s the takeaway message from a new report on health insurance out of Georgetown University’s Center for Children and Families. Edwin Park, a research professor at the center, said the key to the drop is the state’s expansion of Medicaid to include more people.

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Connecticut is receiving a $10 million grant that will be used to increase access to care for people with substance abuse and mental health disorders.

Lisa Wilson (top right) with her family in Hartford, Connecticut. Her son was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

A growing body of research indicates that there are disparities based on race and ethnicity in health care overall. This is also true in the field of autism.

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New federal data find that about one in 59 children has autism spectrum disorder.

National Cancer Institute

Health care advocates say Connecticut needs to do a better job examining just how a person’s race can affect their health and their recovery from disease.

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Kerry Taylor and her husband are self-employed farmers from Salem. She said her family has to consider health insurance costs when balancing the annual business budget.

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Congress blew past a September 30 deadline to reauthorize federal funding for about 1,200 community health centers nationwide. The funding lapse is already having an impact in Connecticut.

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A lot more attention has been paid in recent years to addressing the needs of kids with severe developmental delays and diagnoses like autism. But a new study finds that we're not offering the best help to kids who may have more moderate needs.

Ken Cedeno / International Medical Corps

People displaced by the disaster in Puerto Rico face multiple problems - finding housing, getting kids settled in schools, adjusting to a new climate. And all of those can be intensified if they’re also dealing with health issues.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

When we met Dr. Bolivar Arboleda Osorio in the city of Caguas a few weeks back, he talked about his experience treating patients in the aftermath of the storm -- first came the trauma victims, then came the chronic and severe cases that were becoming emergencies as time dragged on and the lights stayed off. Electronic records were stuck in the cloud. Patients, not able to call for an appointment, just showed up.

DoNotLick

Connecticut’s recently passed biennial budget made drastic changes to health care provisions for some state residents. One of the ways lawmakers saved money was by cutting back Medicaid eligibility. 

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People living in Connecticut’s rural areas are dying at a higher rate than the state average. New data just released by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that in the 68 towns designated as rural, death rates from major killers, such as cancer and heart disease, are all higher. 

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Health insurance for thousands of children in Connecticut could soon disappear.

That’s because Congress failed to meet a September 30th deadline to renew funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program, or CHIP.

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The mass shooting in Las Vegas is dominating the media news cycle. Since the tragedy Sunday night, TV news and social media have displayed a continuous stream of images and video of the chaotic scene at the Highway 91 Harvest Festival that left at least 59 dead.

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The rate of infants dying suddenly and unexpectedly has dropped in recent years, but data show that racial disparities persist.

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We’re inching closer to the end of the fiscal year and Connecticut lawmakers at the state capitol still haven’t been able to reach a budget agreement. Meanwhile at the nation’s capitol, Senate Republicans are postponing a vote on their controversial health care bill.

This hour: a tale of gridlock in Hartford and Washington. 

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Senate Republicans are expected to vote this week on their health care bill that includes cuts to Medicaid funding and allows states to curtail coverage for pre-existing conditions.

This hour, we get reactions from the state’s health care advocate Ted Doolittle and Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal.

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Researchers in Connecticut and nationwide are having a hard time recruiting minorities for clinical trials.

This hour, we find out why and we examine the impact on our health. Does mistrust of doctors and drug companies play a part?

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As Connecticut lawmakers continue to try and work out a new two-year budget, the parents of children and adults with developmental disabilities worry about the services they might lose.

This hour, we hear from these families and learn what’s at stake.

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Medicaid has become an increasingly important source of health insurance coverage for children in the United States. That’s especially true for children living in small towns and rural areas, according to a new report.

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Lawmakers continue to debate health care policy in Washington, and millions wonder if they’ll be insured in the future.

This hour, we consider the impact here at home.

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A genetic test that helps doctors determine how best to treat breast cancer -- and whether chemotherapy is likely to help -- is significantly more likely to be administered to white women than blacks or Hispanics, a Yale study has found.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The health care reform bill that passed the U.S. House of Representatives last week promises sweeping changes to the provisions of the Affordable Care Act. While a lot of attention has focused on things like pre-existing conditions, one of the less considered issues is what may happen to the treatment of mental illness and substance abuse. 

Demos

This hour, we tackle issues involving race, policy, and U.S. democracy with Demos President Heather McGhee.

Plus: a look at efforts to establish paid leave in Connecticut. If passed, how might new legislation impact the state's women of color? We find out and we also hear from you. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

National uncertainty over the future of the Affordable Care Act is making state officials nervous, and the CEO of Access Health CT, the state’s health care exchange, has told his board that he fears insurers could back out of the marketplace the state created. 

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HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the U.S. Nearly half of American adults have it according to a recent report from the National Center for Health Statistics.

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A bipartisan group of legislators and advocates are urging passage of a bill that would allow all pregnant women in Connecticut access to insurance coverage for pre- and post-natal care.

Many refugees who arrive on U.S. soil finally feel safe after decades of war or torture or loss of family members. But just because they're removed from physical harm, it doesn't mean the pain is over. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

President Donald Trump’s budget proposal plans to zero out funding for something called Community Development Block Grants -- money that goes from the federal government to states and municipalities to use as they see fit.

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