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Public Option Hits Rocks, Key Components Stripped From The Bill

May 29, 2019
Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

A contentious, late-stage proposal to create a public health insurance option began to fracture Wednesday, as lawmakers acknowledged that key portions of the bill would be stripped before the measure comes up for a vote in the House. 

Kristy Faith / Creative Commons

A 10-year-old boy in the New Haven area had developed a bad case of chronic asthma — he could no longer play sports with his friends and had to take high doses of steroids. He was constantly missing school and ending up in the emergency department.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

A strike threat by thousands of nursing home workers across Connecticut has been withdrawn after a large group of the nursing home facilities reached a new contract deal Friday.

RYAN CARON KING / CT Public Radio

Lawmakers introduced a measure in Washington that would protect abortion rights. 

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Democratic lawmakers are pushing a new public option health care proposal, angering Republican colleagues so close to the end of the legislative session.

Supporters are calling the new plan Connecticut Option — it’ll be a program overseen by the state and offered through insurance companies or a network created by the state.

Columbia Township Paramedic Kevin Barnard demonstrates how to apply a tourniquet. The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have offered new evidence that a tourniquet can be applied for longer than previously believed.
Matthew Richmond / WCPN

The first time Clevelander Robert Woodard saw someone who had been shot, it was overwhelming.

“So me running to the scene and me getting there and them bleeding and I'm just as hysterical as them,” Woodard remembered. “It's like, ‘Wow, what do I do?’ I have no tools. I have no anything.”

So last summer Woodard, a violence prevention worker with a group called the Wolfpack, completed a first aid training on how to stop bleeding.

Patrick Raycraft / The Hartford Courant

The owner of an apartment complex in the North End of Hartford has twice been called into court to answer for housing violations, but the New York-based landlord has dodged both appearances. The latest was Tuesday.

Many adults are wondering if they should get re-vaccinated for measles, with more than 800 cases this year in the U.S.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The passage of legislation in several states that effectively bans abortion sparked nationwide protests Tuesday, including in Hartford. But the steps of the state capitol also hosted a counter-protest, objecting to a bill in the Connecticut legislature which would place new restrictions on so-called crisis pregnancy centers.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Local health institutions are receiving money to develop a vaccine for syphilis. Doctors from Connecticut Children’s Medical Center and the University of Connecticut will attempt to become the first research unit to test a syphilis vaccine on humans thanks to an $11 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

Genome Research Limited / Creative Commons

Gilead, the biopharmaceutical company responsible for manufacturing Truvada, has come under scrutiny for its HIV drug pricing. This hour, we get the latest on this story. We also preview an upcoming Hartford rally, scheduled to coincide with AIDS Awareness Day. 

Conn. House Passes Bill To Ban Sale Of E-cigarettes To Youth Under 21

May 16, 2019
scyther5/iStock / Thinkstock

After more than three hours of debate, the House approved a bill Thursday that would raise the age from 18 to 21 for anyone purchasing cigarettes, tobacco products and electronic nicotine delivery systems. 

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Legislators said Thursday that they are holding off on changes to the state’s childhood vaccination laws, including the religious exemption.

Army Veteran Peter Antioho with his wife, Amy and son, Mark in their Berlin home. Antioho was exposed to black smoke from an open burn pit in Afghanistan. He's fighting for federal disability benefits.
Melanie Stengel / C-HIT.org

Every day for 10 months in 2012, Peter Antioho walked through dense, black smoke from an open burn pit on his Army base in Afghanistan. Human and medical waste, plastic water bottles, ammunition and chemicals were among the materials burned with diesel fuel 24 hours a day.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

State Attorney General William Tong says his office has diagnosed an aggressive cancer eating away at America's healthcare system.

According to Tong, it's triggered by scheming executives at many of the largest pharmaceutical companies illegally working together to artificially inflate the cost of generic drugs. Forty-three other states are joining the effort spearheaded by Connecticut's AG to litigate drugmakers into a court-ordered treatment plan.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut is leading a major effort to hold generic drug manufacturers responsible for the rising cost of pharmaceuticals.

GOVERNMENT OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND / CREATIVE COMMONS

New and corrected data on school vaccination rates were released Friday after the state gave out controversial and disputed information last week.

Officials from the state Department of Public Health said they worked with school officials to identify and correct errors in a report that shows the number of unvaccinated children attending every school in the state.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Unionized nursing home workers have reissued a notice of their intention to strike for an increase in wages, giving legislators a new deadline Thursday.

Members of the New England Health Care Employees Union, District 1199 SEIU, voted to go on strike June 3 if they don’t see more funding in the next state budget go toward wage increases for industry employees.

Stakeholders Square Off Over Proposed Public Option For Health Coverage

May 9, 2019
A sign at the Health Care Action Day at the state Capitol on May 1.
Christopher Hoffman / C-HIT.org

While tolls, bonding and the budget have dominated this legislative session, a battle has been quietly brewing over the creation of a state-administered health insurance public option for small businesses.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Emails sent by the former chairman of Purdue Pharma are being seen by the public as a result of a complaint filed by the state of Connecticut.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

The owner of Barbour Gardens, a subsidized housing complex in the North End of Hartford, was expected to appear in court Tuesday to face criminal housing charges, but the New York-based landlord was a no-show.

Rhoda Baer/National Cancer Institute / Creative Commons

The state Department of Public Health has made public the number of unvaccinated children attending every school in the state. But some of the numbers have already been disputed as inaccurate. 

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Dr. Suzanne Lagarde and her team at Fair Haven Community Health Care in New Haven see a steady stream of patients most days. People come in for routine wellness checks, or when they’re sick or injured.

And sometimes, a primary care physician could use the help of an e-consult.

Mark Mirko / The Hartford Courant

Connecticut’s highest court heard arguments Tuesday about what should happen to frozen human embryos when a couple gets divorced.

The Supreme Court case, which was started by a divorced Connecticut couple who created frozen embryos while married, joins a group of legal cases across the country that don’t neatly fit into one specific area of the law.

6eo tech / Creative Commons

Sometimes new technology, like the iPhone, comes to us in flashy, attention-grabbing presentations. But other times, it creeps up and changes our world... without us noticing!

One technology that’s made its way into the headlines is artificial intelligence (AI). For some, those two words might stir up images of Ultron or HAL 9000. But AI's role goes well beyond movies or books. In fact, it's been in the real world for decades. And it's becoming more and more prevalent in our daily lives.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

The union representing workers at 20 Connecticut nursing homes has withdrawn a strike notice, saying it’s seen meaningful commitment to find new funding for employees. 

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

In her mid-20s, Sarah Howroyd was in a car accident with her fiancé. She suffered minor injuries to her neck and back, and the couple sought treatment for the pain.

“And we were prescribed an astronomical amount of Oxycontin,” she said.

It was the beginning of her long struggle with opioid addiction. 

Pharmacy Benefit Managers Scrutinized For Role In Drug Price Increases

Apr 24, 2019
Marion Bradley fills a prescription for one of her customers. She is the lead pharmacist and co-owner of Beacon Falls Pharmacy.
Carl Jordan Castro / C-HIT.org

Pharmacy benefit managers – the middlemen who negotiate drug purchases for insurers and large buyers – are coming under growing scrutiny and criticism both in Connecticut and nationwide for their role in the sharp rise of prescription drugs.

Ken Hawkins / Creative Commons

Bulimia. Anorexia. Binge-eating. You have likely heard of these eating disorders before. But what are they, really? And who do they affect?

This hour, we talk with advocates and experts in the field, and we also hear from you. Have you or has someone close to you suffered from an eating disorder? Where did you turn for help? 

Faith-Based Pregnancy Center Files Federal Lawsuit Against City Of Hartford

Apr 19, 2019
Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

A faith-based pregnancy center in Willimantic has asked a federal judge for an injunction against a controversial Hartford ordinance that requires the religious facilities to disclose whether their staff carry medical licenses. The challenge to the local ordinance comes at the same time lawmakers are considering imposing similar rules on a statewide basis. 

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