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Hartford Region

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Governor Ned Lamont discussed with national members of the American Federation of Teachers ways to target – and then retain – teachers.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

There’s some good news for local brewers in Gov. Ned Lamont’s proposed biennium budget, which would cut the alcohol beverage tax on craft breweries in half.

Carlos Mejia / Connecticut Public Radio

To do a show about local stand-up comedy, we figured we should probably do a show of local stand-up comedy.

So we went to a comedy club, put on a comedy show, and then did a talk show about the comedy show we'd just done.

This hour: some of said comedy show plus most of said talk show -- and we're fairly confident it'll make more sense when you hear it than it probably just did reading about it.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

What’s it like to build a house, a family, a life…and then have a war take it all away?  

This hour we sit down with West Hartford, Connecticut residents Adeebah Alnemar and her son, Naji Aldabaan. They’re Syrian refugees who fled during the civil war, and came to Connecticut in 2016.

Their family is the subject of a 2018 Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoon series in the New York Times. We also talk with one of the people behind the cartoon series—New Haven-based journalist Jake Halpern.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Peeling paint, leaking showers, mice and mold—these are just some of the problems that residents of a Hartford apartment complex say they have been dealing with for years. But now, people living at the Barbour Gardens apartment complex claimed a victory in their fight with management after the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced they would help residents relocate to safe housing. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Over 400 women have reported that they’ve been sexually assaulted by male masseuses at a national chain of spas called Massage Envy. One of the accused is an Enfield man who worked at a Glastonbury franchise.

Dean Hochman / flickr.com/photos/deanhochman/

We're doing a show on supermarkets today - from a supermarket!

Most Americans still buy most of their food from a supermarket. While farmer's markets and specialty stores offer organic and local alternatives, large-scale supermarkets still offer more convenience, the lowest prices and a seemingly endless variety of choices. Their big wide aisles with neatly stacked and eye-catching packaged products are hard to resist. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

For eight years, Darko Tresnjak has served as the artistic director at Hartford Stage. This June, the Tony-Award winning director will take his final bow in Hartford and be succeeded by Melia Bensussen. During his stint, the Serbian-born director oversaw Hamlet, The Tempest, Rear Window (with Kevin Bacon), Kiss Me Kate and many other productions, two of which made their way to Broadway: A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder, and Anastasia.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Darko Tresnjak has been artistic director at Hartford Stage Company since 2011. During his tenure here, he's won a Tony. He's had multiple productions make the leap to Broadway. His Anastasia has multiple tours touring internationally.

And this season is his last season in Hartford.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut’s new pro soccer team is in the middle of filling out its inaugural roster in advance of the team’s first preseason game.

Dealer Cai Qilin, center, works on Mini Baccarat at an Asian gambling section in Foxwoods Resort Casino in Mashantucket, Conn., in 2006. Foxwoods estimated at the time that at least one-third of its 40,000 customers per day were Asian.
Chitose Suzuki / Associated Press

Quyen Truong still gets a cozy feeling when she sees a hand of cards.

It reminds her of family and traditions as a refugee from Vietnam who arrived in the U.S. in late 1990. Aunts, uncles and cousins in Connecticut — among the Southeast Asian refugees who resettled here in waves after the Vietnam War — would get together on weekends with rolls of quarters, nickels, pennies and dimes.

Pete Beard / Flickr

They live underground and gorge themselves in dumpsters. This hour, we’re taking a long, hard look at creatures you’d probably rather not think about: RATS!

We hear about how the city of Hartford is fighting these unwelcome rodent residents, and we ask a researcher why are these scurrying creatures so successful at living alongside humans?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The significance of being confirmed as Connecticut's first African-American state Supreme Court chief justice last May didn't fully sink in for Richard A. Robinson until a class of mostly minority students recently showed up to the Hartford court building for a tour.

"It's cold, you're lonely, [and] you feel like there's nobody out there for you," said Andrew Carrington, who slept outside once when it was nine degrees. "It's despair."
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The state activated its severe weather protocol as temperatures dropped toward a low of three degrees in parts of Connecticut Wednesday night and Thursday morning.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Chronic pain sufferers want people to know that the opioid crisis is affecting the way they manage pain.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Election Day 2019 will feature mayoral races in Connecticut’s biggest cities. Candidates challenging established incumbents are beginning to emerge.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

President Donald Trump announced from the White House Friday that he’s made a tentative deal with congress to re-open the government and end the shutdown.

Archbishop Leonard P. Blair speaks during his Mass of Installation at the Cathedral of Saint Joseph in Hartford, Conn., on Monday, Dec. 16. 2013.
Fred Beckham / Associated Press

The Catholic Archdiocese of Hartford has released the names of 48 priests it says have been credibly accused of sexual abuse. It is also appointing a retired state judge to review all of its personnel files back to the 1950s.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Nonprofit organizations are having trouble in their efforts to serve survivors of domestic violence.

Hartford's Adriana Sanchez marches for reproductive rights. "My body is my choice," says Sanchez.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Unity – the power and strength of women who come together to effect change -- was the message at the 2019 Women’s March in Hartford.

Bill Smith / Creative Commons

Literacy. It's something many of us take for granted. The ability to read health forms, headlines, or the latest bestsellers. Yet, across the U.S., there are millions of adults who have difficulty reading.

This hour, we find out why. We talk with literacy experts and advocates, and we also hear from you.

Clarice Silber / CT Mirror

Shuttered national parks, TSA workers calling in sick, hundreds of thousands of paychecks missed. Americans around the country are feeling the impact of the longest government shutdown in U.S. history. But it’s not just federal employees who are struggling.

This hour, we find out how the shutdown is affecting some of the country’s most vulnerable residents.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Senior citizens and residents living below the poverty line may soon struggle to meet their basic food needs because of the government shutdown.

Officer Jim Barrett looked after this year's Footwear With Care Holiday Boot Party by keeping tabs on the line outside the venue in Hartford. He also met with people that he could help next.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

One homeless man’s interaction with a Hartford police officer has become more than just a legendary city tale.

Dean Hochman / Creative Commons

We're doing a show on supermarkets today - from a supermarket!

Most Americans still buy most of their food from a supermarket. While farmer's markets and specialty stores offer organic and local alternatives, large-scale supermarkets still offer more convenience, the lowest prices and a seemingly endless variety of choices. Their big wide aisles with neatly stacked and eye-catching packaged products are hard to resist. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut passengers without certain train tickets continue to experience second-class treatment on Amtrak trains servicing the Hartford Line.

More than 80 handguns were turned in at the 10th Annual Capital Region Gun Buyback. Officers used the back of the tags to write down information about the guns, which aren't actually loaded.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

At the 10th Annual Capitol Region Gun Buyback Program, 137 guns were turned in within six hours, doubling last year's numbers. 

Pexels

The number of kids missing school days in Hartford Public Schools is higher than both the national average and the state average. As a result of this struggle to keep every student in the classroom, Hartford is reaching out for help to Attendance Works, a national organization dedicated to reducing chronic absenteeism.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Nelba Márquez-Greene’s daughter Ana Grace was one of the victims killed at the Sandy Hook Elementary School on December 14, 2012. On Friday, six years after the event, Márquez-Greene marked the tragic event by giving back to families in the New Britain and greater-Hartford area.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Hamilton – the box office smash hit – is in Hartford and one of the actors appearing in the show was actually a student at the Greater Hartford Academy Of The Arts.

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