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The first day of school is just around the corner for many Connecticut students, but “back to school” will look very different for families across Connecticut. 

This hour, we hear from from students, parents and educational leaders.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

The effort to clean up in Connecticut towns and cities continues, a week after Tropical Storm Isaias tore through the state -- leaving many to stew in the dark over the response from utility companies.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Gov. Ned Lamont Thursday continued his tour of towns throughout the state recovering from Tropical Storm Isaias, as residents tried their best to make do without power.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

Students from state high schools will have a shot at athletic competition this fall.

Earlier this year, the state governing body of high school sports stopped play because of the COVID-19 pandemic. But now, the Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference has a plan for Connecticut student-athletes to play in games starting Sept. 24 -- with pandemic-friendly adjustments.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Black Lives Matter murals have been popping up across the country since the killing of George Floyd by police. In Hartford, a mural is tucked away in the city’s North End, with another in the works downtown. And in Stamford, the affirmation Black Lives Matter has been painted on a main street.

Bradley Airport
Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

The state’s travel advisory to visitors from coronavirus hot spots took effect Thursday.

Gov. Ned Lamont and his counterparts from New Jersey and New York say that a visit from areas with high infection rates requires a 14-day self-quarantine.

But the way Lamont was talking as he spoke Thursday from Bradley International Airport, self-quarantine is more of a recommendation than a requirement.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public

A state prosecutor criticized for her handling of police use-of-force investigations was suspended Thursday. State supreme court justice Andrew McDonald announced the suspension of Hartford state’s attorney Gail Hardy, who at one point in 2019 still hadn’t resolved five use of investigations --including four that were at least seven years old -- during a criminal justice commission meeting.

First And Last Tavern
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

First came the return of outdoor dining at Connecticut restaurants, and now the state is allowing indoor dining.

It’s part of Phase 2 of the state’s reopening from what was essentially an economic shutdown due to the coronavirus outbreak.

self-isolation connecticut
Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

COVID-19 has brought death much closer to everyday life for many in Connecticut and around the world. But it’s also had a big impact on how we memorialize and mourn the dead.

Jumana Dakkur / Pexels.com

This hour, we talk about the role white people play in anti-racist work, and how we can all talk with young people about anti-racism.

You’ll hear from John Biewen, audio program director at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. He’s also the host and producer of Scene On Radio, a podcast that tells stories exploring human experience and American society. The second season of that series is called “Seeing White”. Through 14 episodes, it explores America’s deep history of white supremacy. Biewen, who is white, and his co-host and collaborator Chenjerai Kumanyika, Assistant Professor at Rutgers University’s Department of Journalism and Media Studies, who is Black, talk about the manufacturing of the concept of race and the purpose of whiteness.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

Glastonbury High School seniors are receiving their diplomas now, even though the governor has paved the way for group graduation ceremonies during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Office of the Chief State's Attorney

In his resignation letter submitted to the Wethersfield Police Department, Layau Eulizier Jr. wrote that he never thought the day he shot and killed 18-year-old Anthony Jose Vega Cruz would be his last on active patrol in Wethersfield.

Office of the Chief State's Attorney

The officer who shot and killed a Wethersfield teenager after an April 2019 traffic stop has voluntarily resigned from that town’s police department.

People Throughout Connecticut Protest The Death Of George Floyd

May 30, 2020
Joe Amon/Connecticut Public/NENC

Protesters in Hartford, New Haven, Bridgeport, New London, and other parts of Connecticut joined a nationwide call for action Saturday following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody. The protests come as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to unfold -- one day after the Gov. Ned Lamont signed an executive order that further relaxes state restrictions related to the virus.

Max Pixel

While swimming is a popular pastime for many Americans, a history of discrimination at pools nationwide in the 20th century has led to startling racial disparities in swimming abilities. A 2017 USA Swimming Foundation report found more than 6 in 10 African American children have low to no swimming skills.

And that has deadly consequences: Black and Latino children are statistically much more likely to drown than their white peers.

This hour, we hear from a historian about how we got to this point.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

The federal government has sided with a group of Connecticut athletes who have sued the state’s governing body of high school sports over the inclusion of transgender athletes in girls events.

Hartford's Artists Collective
Shana Sureck / WNPR

A group of Black and Latino artists will convene today for the first time to find ways to support and diversify Greater Hartford’s arts community.

The Artists of Color Advisory Group was formed in response to a study by the Hartford Foundation for Public Giving. Its 2019 Greater Hartford Arts Landscape Study concluded that the region had a wealth of diverse artists but a limited amount of opportunities for them.

West Farms Mall
Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Westfarms Mall reopened Wednesday after closing in March because of the coronavirus. But for the steady stream of shoppers, it wasn’t quite the same experience they might remember pre-pandemic. The mall has over 100 shops but because each corporate office makes the decision for its own stores, fewer than 30 were open -- and that meant some shoppers left empty-handed.

The Country Diner
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

Restaurants returned to serving dining customers Wednesday as part of phase one of Connecticut’s COVID-19 reopening plan.

In Enfield, “reopening day” marked the return of The Country Diner, a spot that’s been closed for the past two months.

COVID-19 testing
Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

Drive-through coronavirus testing centers in Hartford have been active for nearly two months, but many North End residents don’t have cars or rely on public transportation to get around. And other barriers, like a lack of health insurance or a doctor’s referral prevented others from getting tested for the disease.

Shady Oaks Assisted Living
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Given that Connecticut’s long-term care facilities house those most vulnerable to infectious diseases, the coronavirus has had a devastating impact. According to the CT Mirror, 57.6% of all COVID-19 deaths in Connecticut have happened in the state’s nursing homes, forcing facilities to take drastic measures to try to keep the disease out.

hartford healthcare
Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Hartford HealthCare has launched a mobile coronavirus testing program in partnership with the city of Hartford that will make it easier to bring testing to people who need it.

Hartford City Hall
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

As Connecticut reported an additional 98 coronavirus-related deaths Saturday afternoon, the administration of Gov. Ned Lamont said it looks to increase testing capacity across the state as hundreds of residents continue to test positive each day. 

Berlin Mosque
Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

Praying together in a mosque could put Muslims at risk of catching COVID-19, so mosques are closed to the public.

That makes for a very different celebration of the holy month of Ramadan in 2020. It means that special evening prayers must be done at home.

Brewery Legitimus
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The state recently tossed a lifeline out to more than 100 craft brewers as part of an effort to keep people in their homes. Gov. Ned Lamont signed an executive order on April 2 allowing liquor permittees to deliver alcohol to state residents during the COVID-19 pandemic.

domestic violence shelter t-shirts
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A nonprofit that houses victims of domestic violence is faced with a need it characterized as “relentless.” That need comes at a time when the potential for abuse increases with families staying at home to combat the spread of coronavirus.

coronavirus
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

A local health official believes the peak of coronavirus infections in Connecticut will happen later this month into early May -- later than the doctor’s network initially predicted.

Tom Hines

Ocean Vuong emigrated to Hartford from Vietnam when he was two years old. His family brought with them the trauma of an American-led war that ravaged their people and their culture. How do they retain their culture and assimilate into one that doesn't want them?

His family struggled in a Hartford very different from the city that many of us experience. It's a place that still exists in the shadows.

expecting parents
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

One Hartford woman looks at the COVID-19 pandemic as the “icing on the cake” for her challenging pregnancy.

Lauren Perrault, 33, is used to husband Gabe Peterson, 35, being by her side at the doctor’s office. 

Personal protective equipment
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public Radio

Personal protective equipment -- or PPE -- for health care workers combatting COVID-19 is in short supply.

Despite a run on this type of gear, doctors and nurses have to move forward with treatment.

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