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Hartford Region

expecting parents
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

One Hartford woman looks at the COVID-19 pandemic as the “icing on the cake” for her challenging pregnancy.

Lauren Perrault, 33, is used to husband Gabe Peterson, 35, being by her side at the doctor’s office. 

Personal protective equipment
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public Radio

Personal protective equipment -- or PPE -- for health care workers combatting COVID-19 is in short supply.

Despite a run on this type of gear, doctors and nurses have to move forward with treatment.

CT transit bus
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

As the Department of Transportation continues to make adjustments to CTtransit service and policies, some bus operators feel as though they’re still at risk of carrying or contracting the coronavirus.

George W. Bush White House

The threat of COVID-19 transmission is hampering our ability to celebrate the lives of those who die as the epidemic continues.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

On Thursday, the state Department of Transportation announced immediate changes to public bus operations.

Passengers will now board from the rear, some buses will have new impermeable barriers to protect drivers, and the DOT is advising riders to use public transit only for essential travel. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The essential duties of a hospital chaplain happen on-site where patients are treated, so it’s hard to work from home at a time when employers are encouraging social distancing to combat the spread of coronavirus.

Courtesy Stephanie Santiago

The Hartford state’s attorney has cleared a Wethersfield police officer in the 2019 shooting death of 18-year-old Anthony Jose Vega Cruz.

restaurants close coronavirus
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

As Connecticut’s food and drink industry implements new rules and regulations to mitigate the spread of coronavirus, many are finding creative ways to stay in business.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Jim Calhoun’s University of Saint Joseph men’s basketball team played its first NCAA Division III Tournament game Friday, 16 months after the Blue Jays had their first game.

ncaa saint jospeh student athletes
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The Jim Calhoun-led men’s basketball team from the University of Saint Joseph has made it to the NCAA Division III Tournament for the first time. The program is only 2 years old.

Theresa Thompson / Creative Commons

Sanders won big in Nevada. Biden won big in South Carolina. Steyer and Buttigieg are out, Bloomberg is in, and Warren and Klobuchar are pulling up the rear.

There will be 1,357 delegates from 14 states up for grabs on Super Tuesday. We try to make sense of it.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The state is setting aside money for Puerto Ricans arriving in Connecticut after being displaced from the island by natural disasters.

Matt Rourke / AP Photo

Residents of Wethersfield say they want to know more about their local police department’s plan to surveil major roadways.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The town of Wethersfield will step up public surveillance in 2020 by installing cameras at several traffic locations. But the enhanced law enforcement is alarming to people who have criticized the way Wethersfield’s police department operates.

Carlos Giusti / AP Photo

The impact of the recent earthquakes in Puerto Rico is now being felt in Connecticut -- at least when it comes to helping those who had to leave the island.

xl center
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Gov. Ned Lamont wants money to fix up Hartford’s XL Center.

It’s part of his budget proposal, and the request is meant to spark a $100 million renovation of the 45-year-old building in downtown Hartford.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public Radio

The city of Hartford used a special exhibition between the powerhouse University of Connecticut Women’s Basketball team and the best American pros as an opportunity to showcase area businesses.

This hour, we air an updated version of the most recent episode of our weekly impeachment show, Pardon Me, which normally airs Saturdays at noon.

Law professor Bruce Ackerman argues that President Trump's order to kill Iranian Major General Qassem Soleimani is a far graver offense than his efforts to pressure Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate Joe Biden. Think about it: He's bragging about his decision to kill a high-ranking official of another country. Will Chief Justice John Roberts save us?

And that's the positive view on the show this week.

Connecticut Settles School Desegregation Case

Jan 10, 2020
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

State officials agreed Friday to enroll more than 1,000 new students in magnet schools as part of a milestone agreement in the decades-long Sheff vs. O’Neill school desegregation case. The agreement dedicates 600 of those seats to the more than 12,000 children who attend struggling, segregated schools in Hartford.

Law professor Bruce Ackerman argues that President Trump's order to kill Iranian Major General Qassem Soleimani is a far graver offense than his efforts to pressure Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate Joe Biden. Think about it: He's bragging about his decision to kill a high-ranking official of another country. Will Chief Justice John Roberts save us?

And that's the positive view on our show this week.

Sarah Kendzior studies autocratic governments. She thinks we'd be foolish to believe there are limits to what the Trump administration would do -- whether jailing witnesses and whistleblowers, threatening protesters, or using nuclear weapons.

The National Arts Program

Artists in Hartford and Middlesex counties are encouraged to submit their latest creations to the 2020 National Arts Program. Hartford is one of 90 venues nationwide chosen to participate in the program. The project culminates in a juried show, where artists in a host of categories can win cash prizes.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Five Connecticut women returning from prison just got a big gift in time for the holiday season -- a new home.

Hartford Courant

On July 6, 1944, the circus came to Connecticut's capital city and erupted into flames. Seventy-five years later, the Hartford Circus Fire is recognized as one of the greatest tragedies in American history.

This hour, 88-year-old survivor Harry Lichtenbaum joins us to share his story. We also talk with the author of a book on the fire and learn about efforts to identify the bodies of its yet unidentified victims. 

Timothy Norris / Courtesy: The Hip Hop Nutcracker

“The Hip Hop Nutcracker” returns to The Bushnell for its third holiday season this Friday. 

There's actually some question whether President Trump has officially been impeached, it turns out.

In any case, on Wednesday, December 18, the U.S. House of Representatives passed two Articles of Impeachment charging the president with abuse of power and obstruction of congress.

On our third full episode, we talk to the founder of Politico about the huge difference a tiny bit of self-control would make to the Trump presidency and a Yale historian about what those crazy founders were thinking when they put impeachment in the Constitution in the first place.

Plus: Our first AccuFrankie report from the Target parking lot in New Britain, Conn., and a song performed live in our studios by Nekita Waller, "Big Al" Anderson, Jim Chapdelaine, and The Shinolas.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

The state has closed four investigations into the use of deadly force by a police officer, and in each case, prosecutors said the use of force was justified.

Denise Gordon / Cuatro Puntos

The Music Moves Hartford Street Choir is a musical group with a difference. The choir members are all part of the downtown homeless community.

The project is a collaboration between Hartford’s Christ Church Cathedral and arts organization Cuatro Puntos.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Salem, Massachusetts has long been a focal point in the history of early New England witch trials. But Windsor, Connecticut also has a place on this dark historical timeline: as the site of the nation's first witch hanging. This hour, author Beth Caruso joins us to shine light this little-known piece of Connecticut's past, and talk about how it inspired her novel One of Windsor.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut’s second snowstorm in as many days left many people throughout the state cleaning up a mess they thought was already behind them.

Manchester Road Race

The 83rd unning of the Manchester Road Race takes place on Thanksgiving, Nov. 28, at 10 a.m.

Some people run to win the race, some run to win their age group and some run for a title -- the title of best costume.

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