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Juneteenth, Middletown CT
Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

Almost two weeks ago today, two children in Hartford were shot and killed within hours of each other. This week, on the heels of the Derek Chauvin verdict, a sixteen year old black girl was shot and killed by the police in Columbus, Ohio. 

This hour, we discuss what happens after gun violence.

Representative Brandon McGee and Kelvin Lovejoy from Hartford Communities That Care join us.

Brenda Leon / Connecticut Public

Hartford police have arrested a teenager in the recent shooting death of a 3-year-old boy in the city’s North End. Jaziah Smith, 19, was charged in the killing of Randell Jones.

Updated April 19, 2021 at 5:29 AM ET

Three people were killed in a shooting in the Great Hills neighborhood of Austin on Sunday, police said.

Austin police said that while the suspect remains at large, the shooting appears to be a "domestic situation" and poses no risk to the general public. The public was temporarily told to shelter in place as police searched for the suspect.

Interim Austin Police Chief Joe Chacon told reporters the three victims were two women and a man.

Streets were blocked off in Branford after police and witnesses say a man fired gunshots from a building.
Ali Oshinskie / Connecticut Public Radio

A tense hourslong standoff with an armed man in Branford that included heavy gunfire ended Tuesday evening when police found the suspect dead in the building in which he’d been barricaded.

Twitter

Hartford police have confirmed that a 3-year-old boy died of gunshot injuries suffered in a drive-by shooting in the city Saturday afternoon. Rondell Jones was in a car with his mother and two older siblings when he was shot.

About two hours later, a 16-year-old was killed and another person injured in a shooting about a mile from the first. Investigators do not believe the two incidents are linked. The 16-year-old was later named by police as Jamari Preston of New Britain.

Updated April 8, 2021 at 9:57 AM ET

President Biden on Thursday will announce initial steps his administration plans to take on firearm safety, along with the nomination of a prominent gun safety advocate to lead the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

The moves, which were previewed Wednesday evening by a senior administration official, come after recent high-profile mass shootings put added pressure on Biden to act on gun violence.

As President Biden called on senators to quickly pass legislation to tighten the nation's background checks system, he said that he did not need to "wait another minute" to address the epidemic of gun violence.

More than 80 handguns were turned in at the 10th Annual Capital Region Gun Buyback. Officers used the back of the tags to write down information about the guns, which aren't actually loaded.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Predictably, it’s already been suggested that the recent mass shooting in Colorado was more an issue of mental health than anything else. Kathy Flaherty of the Connecticut Legal Rights Project says that kind of thinking tends to be both a mistake and harmful to people with psychiatric disabilities. She spoke about this on Connecticut Public Radio’s All Things Considered.

Updated March 25, 2021 at 3:28 PM ET

President Biden is doubling his original COVID-19 vaccination goal to 200 million shots in arms by his 100th day in office — which is just over a month away.

Ben Gray / AP

A recent shooting in the Atlanta area killed eight people. Six of them were women of Asian descent.

It's one of the nearly 4000 hate incidents against this group over the last year.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

U.S. Sens. Chris Murphy and Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut joined House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Thursday to support the passage of stricter gun laws.

A memorial takes shape on a telephone pole near the site where 26-year-old Yale forestry graduate student Kevin Jiang was shot and killed in the Goatville section of New Haven’s East Rock neighborhood.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Earlier this month a Yale graduate student was murdered in New Haven’s East Rock neighborhood, leading to widespread media coverage.

This hour, we ask: why do some shootings get media attention while others do not? We take a look at the way race and privilege shape gun violence coverage.

And we talk with journalists and community members. What trends have you noticed in news coverage of violent crime?

A memorial takes shape on a telephone pole near the site where 26-year-old Yale forestry graduate student Kevin Jiang was shot and killed in the Goatville section of New Haven’s East Rock neighborhood.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

The shooting death of a Yale University graduate student is being highlighted by New Haven officials as part of a recent rash of gun violence in the city.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Newtown’s legislative body rejected three proposed gun ordinances that backers say were intended to address armed intimidation at protests.

Nick Lebron

Shootings are up in Hartford in 2020, including what the city’s mayor calls an “unusual and severe” spike into the fall. And while this problem isn’t unique to Hartford, there is a major effort underway to pinpoint the cause of the problem in Connecticut’s capital.

Blurred image of police car lights
WCN 24/7 / Flickr

Connecticut’s capital city is experiencing another public health crisis amidst the pandemic -- an epidemic of gun violence.

There have been more than 50 shootings in Hartford since September.

This hour, we talk about what’s behind this disturbing rise in violence, and how to address it. Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin joins us and we hear from anti-violence advocates.

How should we make sense of a rise in shootings through a public health lens? We hear from an expert who used to lead the CDC’s national injury prevention center.

Right-Wing Extremism

Oct 15, 2020
Anthony Crider / Creative Commons

The pandemic, coupled with Black Lives Matter protests, and incendiary rhetoric from President Trump, has riled up anti-government militias across the US, most evident in the recent foiled plot by militia groups in Michigan, to kidnap Governor Gretchen Whitmer. 

DavidsonScott15 / Creative Commons

Hartford Police have identified a man who was killed in a shooting as city resident Kennedy Burgess, 28. He was shot during the second of two incidents in the city Monday night. Mayor Luke Bronin said Tuesday that he thinks the coronavirus crisis is playing a role in the uptick in violence in Hartford.

The coronavirus pandemic appears to have helped spur an increase in gun sales. New preliminary research suggests those additional sales could be linked to higher rates of gun violence.

Creative Commons

You're shopping for groceries. Out of the blue your heart starts to race, your knees feel weak, you feel like you can't breathe, like you might be having a heart attack. You wonder if you're losing your mind -- but you're not. You're having a panic attack. 

About 1 in 4 people have had at least one panic attack during their lives, yet few like to admit it. Because panic manifests through physical symptoms that can mimic a heart attack, a lot of people feel shame when they go to the ER and find there's nothing wrong with them. In the absence of a test that defines panic, a lot of people worry they might be losing their mind.  

Gail Hardy
Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public

Gail Hardy authored a surprising twist Monday to her reappointment as lead prosecutor for the Hartford Judicial District.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public

A state prosecutor criticized for her handling of police use-of-force investigations was suspended Thursday. State supreme court justice Andrew McDonald announced the suspension of Hartford state’s attorney Gail Hardy, who at one point in 2019 still hadn’t resolved five use of investigations --including four that were at least seven years old -- during a criminal justice commission meeting.

Office of the Chief State's Attorney

The Wethersfield Police Department hasn’t yet started an internal investigation into the shooting death more than a year ago of an 18-year-old driver.

Owning a handgun significantly increases one’s risk of suicide, according to a study published Thursday that tracked new gun owners in California for more than a decade.

Mental health experts and researchers have long known that gun ownership suggests an increased risk of suicide, but the study published in the New England Journal of Medicine adds a new level of detail.

Office of the Chief State's Attorney

In his resignation letter submitted to the Wethersfield Police Department, Layau Eulizier Jr. wrote that he never thought the day he shot and killed 18-year-old Anthony Jose Vega Cruz would be his last on active patrol in Wethersfield.

Office of the Chief State's Attorney

The officer who shot and killed a Wethersfield teenager after an April 2019 traffic stop has voluntarily resigned from that town’s police department.

The global pandemic is putting a strain on Americans’ mental health. There’s been a surge of calls to crisis lines in the past two months. Add a spike in gun sales to that , and experts say we may be at risk of a suicide epidemic.

Tiny Montpelier, Idaho, may already be taking the brunt of pandemic fallout. In that town of just 2,500 and the surrounding Bear Lake Valley — a picturesque, remote corner of the state known for its namesake turquoise lake — there were five suicides in a three-week span of April. Another two deaths are being investigated.

A few weeks ago on this show, you heard how Gaylord Health is using the song “Don’t Stop Believin’” every time they celebrate the release of a Covid-19 patient. This hour, you'll meet one of them. After being hospitalized for 7 weeks, 42 year-old West Haven resident Anthony Spina came home last week.

COVID-19 Deaths Hit 3,000, Connecticut Prepares To Reopen, And Gun Rights Group Files Suit

May 11, 2020

As Connecticut continues to focus on reopening its economy, this state’s coronavirus death toll reached a grim milestone Monday. State officials reported that 3,008 people here have now succumbed to this deadly disease.

An official at the U.S. Department of Justice is warning of an increase in domestic violence due to the wave of recent gun-buying spurred by the coronavirus pandemic, echoing concerns advocates have raised for weeks.

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