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Like many Americans, our newsroom was glued to the eight or so hours of testimony by Dr. Christine Blasey-Ford and Judge Brett Kavanaugh during last week's Senate Judiciary Hearings, including the dramatic committee vote on Friday that led to a limited FBI investigation. 

Senate Judiciary Committee

Dr. Christine Blasey Ford’s account of what she said Judge Brett Kavanaugh did to her in the early 1980s acted as a trigger for many of the millions who watched on television. It’s forcing survivors to relive abuse they’ve suffered.

Hernan Pinera / Flickr

How well do we really know the poor? As our nation's economy grows and the jobless rate decreases, are we increasingly ignoring their voices? Haven't we always ignored them?

Andrew Turner / Creative Commons

There's a mostly forgotten story by the mostly forgotten sci-fi writer, R.A. Lafferty. It's called, "What's The Name of That Town." We meet a team of scientists and an amusing sentiant computer examining clues that suggested something existed once upon a time and has now been erased.

It turns out to be the city of Chicago which has been obliterated in an accident so traumatic that the city's existence has been wiped from all records and from peoples actual memories.

Angela N / Creative Commons

Today, we have no guests. We want to hear from you. We canceled our previously planned show so we could dedicate the entire hour to understanding how you are feeling about the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the  Supreme Court.

Carmen Baskauf / WNPR

Adriana Falcón Trafford is a West Hartford resident who came to Connecticut from Chile in 1974 to escape the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet. This week marks the 45-year anniversary of the military coup in which brought Pinochet to power.  Connecticut Public Radio's Where We Live reflected on the events and what they meant for Chile and for the world. 

James Boyes / Creative Commons

After Naomi Osaka won the first set against Serena Williams during Saturday's U.S. Open Women's Final, chair umpire Carlos Ramos gave Williams a warning for receiving help from her coach, Patrick Mouratoglou, who was sitting in the stands. She asked Ramos to take it back. She told him she doesn't cheat. Ramos didn't take it back. After that, it got ugly.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A New Haven woman is scheduled to be deported to her native Bangladesh this Thursday. On Tuesday, she made it to Hartford for her final check-in with immigration officials.

The Battle For Butter

Aug 20, 2018
Robert S. Donovan/flickr creative commons

We tend not to think much about that pat of butter we put on our morning toast, including how the store-bought sweet cream butter we're eating likely pales in comparison to the rich, nutty flavor of  the cultured butter not found in many stores.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

It didn’t take long for the gloves to come off in the race to be Connecticut’s next governor.

Ryohei Noda / Creative Commons

Hannah Arendt's 576-page magnum opus, The Origins of Totalitarianism, is a densely-written book about the rise of anti-Semitism up to the outbreak of World War I. The book sold out on Amazon within one month of the 2016 election in which America elected Donald Trump as their next president. 

Jesus Garzon / Connecticut Public Radio

Every Democratic member of the Senate Judiciary Committee has joined in making a Freedom of Information Act request for records related to the career of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. 

R. NIal Bradshaw / Creative Commons

The Washington Post, in The Fact Checker database they've kept since the 2016 electionnotes an increase in the number of false or misleading claims the president has made in recent months while traveling the country to campaign for Republicans running in summer primaries.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut experienced an increase in new voter registration after the 2016 presidential election.

The secretary of the state’s office is reporting that 275,114 new voters registered between the between November 2016 and July 2018, an increase over data collected 20 months out from the 2014 mid-term election.

Cody R. Wilson/"@radomysisky" on Twitter

Connecticut has announced it’s joining a group of states suing the federal government over a settlement reached in June with a Texas group that wants to distribute blueprints to create untraceable guns by 3D printing.

CT-N

Senator Richard Blumenthal has introduced a resolution in the Senate calling on the government to declassify and release documents related to 9/11. Families of the victims of the massacre believe the documents will show the true extent of the government investigation into the hijackers’ ties to sponsors in Saudi Arabia.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

George Packer wrote in The New Yorker this weekend that the only obstacle left to prevent President Trump's full consolidation of power is public opinion. We must vote.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Joe Ganim was once a rising Democratic star who was turning around Connecticut’s largest and most troubled city. But then the Bridgeport mayor was convicted of 16 counts of felony corruption in office and sentenced to seven years in federal prison.

Surprisingly, Ganim returned to Bridgeport and was elected mayor once again.

Now, he is asking voters to choose him as Connecticut’s next governor.

Voting booth
Chion Wolf / WNPR

What do Manny Santos, Rich DuPont, and Ruby Corby O’Neill have in common? Well, yes, they are Republicans… but more than that, they are all running for Connecticut’s 5th Congressional District seat.

This hour, we meet the candidates.

We learn about their backgrounds and talk about the issues central to their campaigns… and to the residents they hope to represent. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Mark Boughton is no stranger to Connecticut politics. He has been the mayor of Danbury since 2002, and also waded into the governor’s race the past two election cycles. This time, Boughton is coming into the race with the GOP party endorsement, though he’ll be on a crowded ballot with four other Republican hopefuls.  

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, also known as food stamps, can help people in urban centers overcome barriers to fresh foods that are affordable.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The state bond commission approved funding for a $10 million study of road tolls Wednesday.

Meet The Candidates: Steve Obsitnik

Jul 24, 2018
Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour, we sit down with Republican gubernatorial contender Steve Obsitnik.

What drove the Westport-based veteran and businessman to enter the race? What kind of future does he envision for the state and its residents?

We find out and we also hear from you. 

Later, political experts Ben Mallet and Bilal Sekou provide analysis of our interview and tell us what they will be watching for in the weeks leading up to August 14

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Local advocates for migrant children separated from their parents at the United States border said Monday that they don’t believe the Trump administration will meet a court-ordered deadline to bring the families together. The deadline imposed by a U.S. district court in California is July 26.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut is suing the federal government over Republican tax cuts. The $1.5 trillion cuts were signed by President Donald Trump in December and included a cap on federal deductions for state and local tax, or SALT.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Two Central American migrant children sent to Connecticut after being separated from their parents at the border have been reunited with their parents and the families released into the community.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The state of Connecticut has set aside $1.5 million to meet the needs of Puerto Rican evacuees and the Connecticut municipalities that took them in for the current fiscal year.

Meet The Candidates: Ned Lamont

Jul 12, 2018
Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio


Ned Lamont is a familiar name in Connecticut politics. The Greenwich businessman has run for the U.S. Senate and for governor. And now he’s trying again.

 

In May, Lamont easily won enough delegate votes to become the Democratic nominee for governor in 2018. This hour, we sit down with the candidate.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut Attorney General George Jepsen said he welcomes the resignation of Scott Pruitt, who headed up the federal Environmental Protection Agency.

Fort Meade Public Affairs Office / Creative Commons

Populism is on the rise from Europe to India to the United States.

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