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In corporate America, chief operating officers are the glue that hold business units together and ensure they are all moving forward on the same page. 

But can they work as effectively in the public sector as they do in the private sector? Incoming Governor Ned Lamont, who takes office Wednesday, has faith that they can. He's tasked public policy specialist Paul Mounds Jr. to be state government's first-ever COO.

An Exit Interview With Governor Dannel Malloy

Jan 3, 2019
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Dannel Malloy’s eight-year run as Connecticut’s 88th governor is coming to an end. On January 9, Governor-elect Ned Lamont will take his place. Connecticut Public Radio’s Colin McEnroe talked one-on-one with the exiting governor on his legacy, how the Sandy Hook tragedy profoundly impacted him, and what he’s planning to do next.

Amar Batra / Connecticut Public Radio

It's the New Year and, for Ned Lamont, that means there is only one week left to prepare for the day he takes over the reins of state government.

Lamont has signaled a willingness to be a consensus-builder, someone who brings together opposing viewpoints to reach effective solutions. But does he have the backbone to stand firm during the budget process when groups that propelled him into office present him with wish-lists the state can't readily afford?

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Thanks to what he calls a “quirk in history,” Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal said that members of one United States military branch may not get paid in full during the government shutdown.

PURA Chair Katie Dykes Named DEEP Commissioner

Dec 27, 2018
Katie Dykes on Connecticut Public Radio's Where We Live in 2015 when she was deputy commissioner of the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection.
Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

In naming Katie Dykes as commissioner of the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, Gov.-elect Ned Lamont has chosen a person who is well known at DEEP.

With no deal in sight to keep the government funded, hundreds of thousands of federal employees will either not be returning to work after holiday vacations or will be back on the job but without pay.

President Trump reiterated Tuesday that he is in no mood to compromise over funding for a wall along the southern border, and Democrats who oppose the measure are showing no signs of budging either.

The partial shutdown of the U.S. government that began Saturday affects about a quarter of the government. About 800,000 federal workers will feel the effects as lawmakers try to come to an agreement on a set of spending bills to keep the government funded.

A central sticking point remains funding for President Trump's proposed border wall, and with the Senate adjourned until Thursday, there is no apparent quick end in sight.

Rosie O'Beirne / Creative Commons

The troubling gap between the rich and the poor in Connecticut is formidable and only getting more profound.

Studies have shown that failing to address income inequality hampers overall economic growth. So it's in everyone's interest that something is done about it. But with the state carrying the weight of massive debt payments, can we afford more programs designed to lift up those at the bottom? Can we afford not to spend more?

Jason D. Neely

It began as a six-month assignment covering the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. But NPR reporter Adrian Florido has been on the ground in Puerto Rico for more than a year now.

This hour, we check in with Florido. What changes has he observed since arriving on the island?

flickr creative commons

Social structures, in almost all cases, are defined by some form of hierarchy. Whether in academics, sports, religion, business, or politics, there's usually someone at the top and others whose goal it is to get there. But while it's easy to think that we've designed our world to be this way, the truth may be that we had no choice.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

A state attorney general is expected to be the “people’s lawyer.” William Tong said that when he assumes Connecticut’s attorney general post in January, he’ll look for a new way to advocate for his constituents.

Creative Commons

What did he know and when did he know it?

Prosecutors from Special Counsel Robert Mueller's team and the Southern District of New York on Friday afternoon came closer to answering these questions as they relate to President Trump and his campaign's interference in the 2016 election.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

When it comes to being a check on the president's power, many say Congress has fallen down on the job. But another force has risen up to take over that role: state attorneys general.

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

In their first full week following the election, Democratic Governor-elect Ned Lamont and Lieutenant Governor-elect Susan Bysiewicz announced the members of their Transition Steering Committee Thursday. 

United Kingdom Government / Wikimedia Commons

This weekend was the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I. World leaders convened in Paris and listened to French president Emmanuel Macron warn against reviving the "old demons" of nationalism that led to our first world war. 

Ned Lamont Outlines Transition Plan

Nov 9, 2018
Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

Governor-elect Ned Lamont announced his transition plans Thursday on the steps of the state capitol. Lamont says that he'll have two transition groups -- one focused on the budget, and the other on economic development. 

Mark Goebel / Creative Commons

We have a tradition on the show of celebrating voting and the people who vote by speaking to thoughtful "citizen observers" from around the state about their experience of voting on this Election Day. 

Theresa Thompson / Creative Commons

It's almost over. One more day of lawn signs, robocalls, nasty mailers and deceptive commercials. Election Day is upon us and is shaping up to bring an unprecedented number of voters to the polls.  

Little Hinges USA / Google Images

Are you one of those people who wants to vote for Oz Griebel for governor but won't because you're afraid your vote might lead to a win for your least favorite candidate? 

Race For Governor 2018: Ned Lamont

Oct 26, 2018
Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour, we sit down with Democratic gubernatorial candidate Ned Lamont.

What is Lamont's strategy for reaching Connecticut voters ahead of the November 6 election? We find out and we also hear from you. 

Republican nominee for governor, Bob Stefanowski.
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

For this hour, we had booked Republican gubernatorial candidate Bob Stefanowski for an interview where he could take questions from us and listeners. But his campaign canceled saying it's priority is "getting Bob on the road." 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

He was at the head of the Hartford-area economic development group, MetroHartford Alliance, from 2001 to last year. Now, he wants to be governor of Connecticut.

This hour we sit down with Oz Griebel, who is running as an unaffiliated candidate for governor of Connecticut.

Race For Governor 2018: Rod Hanscomb

Oct 18, 2018
Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour, we sit down with Libertarian gubernatorial candidate Rod Hanscomb. What drove the Stamford, Connecticut resident to enter the race? And what issues would he prioritize if elected to lead the state?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

A state official is trying to get quasi-public agencies to be more transparent, but that's proving to be a bit difficult.

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley has announced she will resign from the post by year's end, raising questions and speculation as to who will fill the high-ranking vacancy.

This hour, we examine one possible candidate: former Connecticut U.S. Senator Joe Lieberman. What qualifications would Lieberman bring to the position? And what would it take for him to be confirmed?

Later, we talk about trends in U.S. civics education. Are children who are exposed to the topic earlier more likely to develop into engaged voters?

And finally, controversy surrounding New Britain’s Paul Manafort Sr. Drive has drawn attention to a lesser-known Connecticut son, Ebenezer Bassett. Who was he? And how should the state honor his legacy? 

Mark Goebel / Creative Commons

Despite Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and attempts by hackers to infiltrate voter-registration databases in Illinois, Arizona and several other states in the summer of 2016, little has been done to better secure America's network of electronic voting systems.

Donkey Hotey / Creative Commons

  

Newt Gingrich and Bill Clinton were using strategies to deliberately divide America's political system decades before the pivotal 2000 presidential election between Al Gore and George W. Bush divided us into gangs of  'red' or 'blue.'

Eric Draper / Wikimedia Commons

Like many Americans, our newsroom was glued to the eight or so hours of testimony by Dr. Christine Blasey-Ford and Judge Brett Kavanaugh during last week's Senate Judiciary Hearings, including the dramatic committee vote on Friday that led to a limited FBI investigation. 

Senate Judiciary Committee

Dr. Christine Blasey Ford’s account of what she said Judge Brett Kavanaugh did to her in the early 1980s acted as a trigger for many of the millions who watched on television. It’s forcing survivors to relive abuse they’ve suffered.

Hernan Pinera / Flickr

How well do we really know the poor? As our nation's economy grows and the jobless rate decreases, are we increasingly ignoring their voices? Haven't we always ignored them?

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