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Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Legislators scrutinized the governor’s pick for commissioner of the Department of Economic and Community Development and senior economic advisor this week, highlighting his time as at the firm Goldman Sachs and the company’s role during the 2008 financial crisis.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

State lawmakers are taking up several gambling related bills, including ones that would expand sports betting and another on a proposed East Windsor casino.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

There’s some good news for local brewers in Gov. Ned Lamont’s proposed biennium budget, which would cut the alcohol beverage tax on craft breweries in half.

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This hour: the crisis in Venezuela. We take an in-depth look at the realities on the ground in the country and consider the future that lies ahead for its people.

Plus: We learn how a New London, Connecticut-based nonprofit is opening residents’ eyes to the diverse cultures of Latin America. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut and 15 other states are suing the Trump administration over the president’s use of a national emergency declaration to fund a border wall.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Peeling paint, leaking showers, mice and mold—these are just some of the problems that residents of a Hartford apartment complex say they have been dealing with for years. But now, people living at the Barbour Gardens apartment complex claimed a victory in their fight with management after the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced they would help residents relocate to safe housing. 

Brock Long, who led the Federal Emergency Management Agency during 220 declared disasters since 2017, announced his resignation Wednesday.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut lawmakers are taking a closer look at how crisis pregnancy centers advertise their services to women. The state Public Health Committee heard testimony this week on a bill that would make it illegal for centers to be “false, misleading or deceptive” in what they offer in reproductive medical services, counseling or treatment. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut’s former attorney general has found a new job. And for some it’s a controversial choice, as he could end up advising some of the entities he sued while he worked for the state.

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Wilhelm Reich was a once-promising psychoanalyst and scientist under the guidance of Freud in pre-World War II Europe. He promoted the "sexual revolution" to support his belief that sexual repression was linked to the bodily and societal ills of neurosis and fascism.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The fate of a contested election in Stratford will be decided the state House of Representatives. But the House will have to consider two conflicting resolutions by the legislature's Committee on Contested Elections. 

Master Steve Rapport / Creative Commons

There's a healthy debate going on about whether to initiate impeachment proceedings against President Trump.

The Atlantic's Yoni Appelbaum and others say now is the time to begin the process. History tells us that the process of impeachment, not the outcome, is a vital protection against the dangers of a president who has not kept his promise to preserve and defend our Constitution. Others say Trump will need to be beaten at the polls in the absence of Mueller-stamped evidence.  

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What happens when a community comes together to talk about issues of race and racism? This hour, we find out how one Southington, Connecticut group is helping facilitate conversations between residents and town officials.

Erica Roggeveen Byrne, founder of Southington Women for Progress, joins us. We also sit down with Oliver Scholes of the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center in Hartford, Connecticut. And we want to hear from you. 

Does Working More Days Make State Legislatures More Effective?

Jan 25, 2019
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut purposely doesn't have a full-time legislature.

But state lawmakers' jobs aren't considered part-time either, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

They fall somewhere in between.

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

A startup biotechnology company out of Yale University is concerned that the government shutdown will have an impact on a new drug they’ve been working on. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

As the shutdown of nine federal departments drags into its second month, it's not only about federal government workers going without paychecks.

There has been an increase in warnings that various programs may also take a hit due to the stalemate between President Donald Trump and Democrats over border wall funding.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Nonprofit organizations are having trouble in their efforts to serve survivors of domestic violence.

Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

Governor Ned Lamont has announced a partnership with local banks that will see federal workers in Connecticut offered interest-free loans to help them during the government shutdown. 

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The partial government shutdown is taking its toll on furloughed employees and those who are forced to work without pay at Bradley International Airport. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Coast Guard families are enduring hardships as active duty personnel and civilian employees live without pay during the government shutdown.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Ned Lamont was sworn in as the 89th governor of Connecticut Wednesday following a short parade outside the state Capitol. But the pomp and pageantry greeting a new governor didn’t always happen in the middle of winter.

Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

Ned Lamont has been waiting for this day for a particularly long time.

Our next governor may slip in a few new details about his specific policy goals after he takes the oath of office on Wednesday. But Inauguration Day will mostly be a time for Lamont to set the tone of his forthcoming administration.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut will have a new governor Wednesday. Ned Lamont takes over from his fellow Democrat Dannel Malloy as he takes the oath of office in a ceremony at the State Armory. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Senior citizens and residents living below the poverty line may soon struggle to meet their basic food needs because of the government shutdown.

CTMirror.org

In corporate America, chief operating officers are the glue that hold business units together and ensure they are all moving forward on the same page. 

But can they work as effectively in the public sector as they do in the private sector? Incoming Governor Ned Lamont, who takes office Wednesday, has faith that they can. He's tasked public policy specialist Paul Mounds Jr. to be state government's first-ever COO.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Dannel Malloy’s eight-year run as Connecticut’s 88th governor is coming to an end. On January 9, Governor-elect Ned Lamont will take his place. Connecticut Public Radio’s Colin McEnroe talked one-on-one with the exiting governor on his legacy, how the Sandy Hook tragedy profoundly impacted him, and what he’s planning to do next.

Amar Batra / Connecticut Public Radio

It's the New Year and, for Ned Lamont, that means there is only one week left to prepare for the day he takes over the reins of state government.

Lamont has signaled a willingness to be a consensus-builder, someone who brings together opposing viewpoints to reach effective solutions. But does he have the backbone to stand firm during the budget process when groups that propelled him into office present him with wish-lists the state can't readily afford?

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Thanks to what he calls a “quirk in history,” Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal said that members of one United States military branch may not get paid in full during the government shutdown.

PURA Chair Katie Dykes Named DEEP Commissioner

Dec 27, 2018
Katie Dykes on Connecticut Public Radio's Where We Live in 2015 when she was deputy commissioner of the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection.
Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

In naming Katie Dykes as commissioner of the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, Gov.-elect Ned Lamont has chosen a person who is well known at DEEP.

With no deal in sight to keep the government funded, hundreds of thousands of federal employees will either not be returning to work after holiday vacations or will be back on the job but without pay.

President Trump reiterated Tuesday that he is in no mood to compromise over funding for a wall along the southern border, and Democrats who oppose the measure are showing no signs of budging either.

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