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National Transportation Safety Board

Federal investigators have yet to say what exactly caused the crash of a B-17 vintage plane at Bradley International Airport earlier this month, but a new report released Tuesday details the pilot’s account of an engine issue moments before impact.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR/Creative Commons

President Trump leaves chaos in his wake.

There is chaos in Syria. Turkish artillery fire is targeting the Kurdish-led militia that has been allied with U.S. Special Forces over the last five years in their war against ISIS. Syrians are fleeing their homes, ISIS prisoners are escaping from prisons no longer guarded by the Kurds, and the last U.S. troops pulled out on Sunday.

Azad Hamoto has an aunt in Syria who is likely to join many of the other Kurds who've been displaced by war. Hamoto spoke to reporters at a news conference in Hartford on October 10.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Kurds in Connecticut are concerned for loved ones in northern Syria following a military attack by Turkey.

The invasion began Wednesday – three days after President Donald Trump abruptly announced he’d withdraw U.S. troops from the area.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

On January 31, 2018, Kristin and Mike Song's 15-year-old son Ethan Song, accidentally shot and killed himself at his friend's house. They were handling a gun they knew was kept in a bedroom closet. The gun was one of three guns owned by the friend's father. They were in a cardboard box inside a tupperware container that was hidden in a bedroom closet. The guns had locks but the keys and ammunition were in the same box. 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

The House of Representatives is conducting an impeachment inquiry into President Trump for his call for an investigation of Joe Biden’s son by the Ukranian government; Trump now says he and his White House won’t cooperate with what it’s calling an illegitimate effort “to overturn the results of the 2016 election” - an obstruction that the House might use to consider another article of impeachment. 

AP Photo / Pablo Martinez Monsivais

The number of Americans supporting the impeachment of President Donald Trump has leveled off, according to a recent pol from the Quinnipiac University poll.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

The Supreme Court begins a new session Monday. It will be the first full term since the more conservative Justice Brett Kavanaugh replaced the retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

As impeachment news consumes Washington, more and more Americans seem to think that the House inquiry is a good idea. 

Ryan Caron King / Flickr

A lot has happened since House Speaker Nancy Pelosi initiated an impeachment inquiry against President Trump last week after learning that Trump asked Ukrainian president Volodymyr Velensky to interfere in the 2020 election.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

House Democrats are moving closer to initiating impeachment proceedings against President Trump after he confirmed that he discussed 2020 presidential candidate and political rival Joe Biden, with the Ukrainian president.

The possibility that the president may have subjugated the national interest for personal political gain is a "new chapter of lawlessness," according to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Is this the tipping point for impeachment? What are the implications of seeking to impeach -- or not? 

Fall River City Council Hires Boston Law Firm To Enforce Order To Oust Mayor

Sep 19, 2019
Nadine Sebai / The Public's Radio

The city council in Fall River, MA voted Wednesday night to hire a Boston law firm and enforce the temporary removal of its mayor Jasiel Correia. 

Neil Palmer/CIAT / CIFOR

As fires burn in the Amazon rainforest, we ask: To what extent is deforestation responsible for the flames? Coming up, we check in with climate scientist Dr. Carlos Nobre.

But first, we talk to Scott Wallace about his reporting on illegal logging in the Amazon. What impact does it have on the rainforest? And what is being done to stop it? 

Jessse Yuen / Flickr Creative Commons

In early 2017, The New York Times uncovered a program at the Defense Department which investigated unidentified flying objects. Then, at the end of May, the reporters published another article, getting navy pilots to talk on the record about their encounters with unidentified flying objects. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR/Creative Commons

We want to hear your thoughts on what it's like to be "living in a Trump salad," on this all-call Monday. (Colin coined the term.)

First, there's #sharpiegate. Last week, President Trump unleashed on the media for reporting his error tweeting  a warning about Hurricane Dorian that included the state of Alabama. To prevent mass evacuation, the National Weather Service corrected his error. Alabama was not in danger. 

Lamont On Immigration: 'I Feel A Lot More Urgency'

Sep 6, 2019
Connecticut Public Radio

Gov. Ned Lamont was told Thursday that fears about a Trump administration rule permitting homeland security officials to deny green cards to legal immigrants who accept public assistance already are rippling through this city of immigrants, weeks before its effective date. 

State Employee Overtime Is Up, But Salary Costs Are Lower Than A Decade Ago

Sep 5, 2019
Chion Wolf / WNPR

While a new report shows state employee overtime costs have risen for the second consecutive year, overall salary expenses are way down over the past decade.

The big factor behind both trends: a concerted push during former Gov. Dannel P. Malloy’s administration to reduce the Executive Branch workforce. 

Trump Nominates Connecticut's Nardini, Jongbloed To Federal Bench

Aug 29, 2019
Kuzma/iStock / Thinkstock

President Donald J. Trump on Wednesday nominated a federal prosecutor and a state judge to vacancies on the U.S. 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals and the U.S. District Court in Connecticut.

Assistant U.S. Attorney William Nardini was named to succeed Judge Christopher F. Droney on the appellate court, while Superior Court Judge Barbara Jongbloed was selected to serve as a U.S. District Court judge for Connecticut, succeeding Judge Alvin W. Thompson. 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

U.S. Representative Jahanna Hayes (D-5th District) issued a press release Sunday accusing the news media of “clickbait journalism” in response to two recent stories she claims made “reckless assumptions” about her comments.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement / Flickr

Connecticut Attorney General William Tong is fighting recent immigration policy put forth by the Trump Administration.

Last week, Tong joined 17 other attorneys general in opposing the implementation of expedited removal. 

Courtesy: Planned Parenthood of Southern New England

Planned Parenthood of Southern New England has blasted a Trump administration rule which denies funding to healthcare providers who refer patients for abortions.

The funding comes from the federal Title X program, which provides family planning services such as contraceptives, testing for sexually transmitted infections and breast cancer screenings to low income residents. 

Louis Weisberg / Creative Commons

You responded so enthusiastically to our all-call show last Monday, we decided to try it again this week.

What's on your mind? The world is you oyster, at least from 1-2 pm this afternoon.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Attorneys general from several U.S. states, including Connecticut, have allied in opposition to new Trump administration rules that target immigrants. This hour, we sit down with Connecticut Attorney General William Tong to learn more. 

Murphy Gives Gun Background Check Bill "Less Than 50-50" Odds

Aug 25, 2019
Chion Wolf / WNPR

Sen. Chris Murphy on Friday said any attempt by Congress to approve a bill expanding FBI background checks of gun purchasers has a “less than 50-50” chance of success.

During a press conference in Hartford, Murphy said he spoke with White House legislative staff several times, most recently on Thursday evening, about support for new gun laws in the wake of mass shootings earlier this month in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio.

Murphy said President Donald Trump has wavered since he telephoned the Democratic senator to talk about new gun legislation.

Kathleen Megan / CT Mirror

Miguel Cardona, the state’s new education chief, charged the state’s superintendents to challenge “the normalization of failure” to ensure that all students have a chance to succeed. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut’s Attorney General said Wednesday he’s joining New York and Vermont in bringing a lawsuit against the Trump administration over immigrants’ access to public benefits because the government’s actions are damaging to this state’s economy and communities. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Lawmakers and members of the public listened at a forum in Hartford on Tuesday, as more details emerged regarding alleged mismanagement inside a quasi-public state agency. The Connecticut General Assembly’s Transportation Committee hosted the public hearing in order to learn more about the corporate structure of the Connecticut Port Authority.

Over Fishing, Lamont Gets To Know Cuomo

Aug 20, 2019
Courtesy: Office of Gov. Ned Lamont

Gov. Ned Lamont interrupted a two-week vacation at his summer home in Maine on Tuesday to fly to Lockport, N.Y., for a morning of sport fishing and policy talks on Lake Ontario with Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Senator Richard Blumenthal is warning consumers about a proposal from the federal government that could force them to pay more for potentially inadequate repairs if they're involved in a car accident.

Audit: Mass. RMV Saw Conn. Notice About Driver Before Fatal N.H. Crash

Aug 18, 2019
Jesse Costa / WBUR

Almost two months before a Massachusetts man allegedly killed seven people in a crash, a Registry of Motor Vehicles employee opened an alert from Connecticut warning that the driver had refused a chemical test during a traffic stop. 

L'Observateur Russe / Wikimedia Commons

The 18th century Parisian cafe was an incubator for the liberal tradition as it was before liberalism became a politically-loaded and dirty word. The cafe brought people together to exchange ideas, talk, connect, argue, debate, and learn about humanity, empathy, and humility outside the control of the state; a place where civil society trumped tribal impulse. 

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