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Thomas Hart / Wikimedia Commons

Benedict Arnold's reputation as a traitor instead of a skilled warrior and confidante of George Washington, has become accepted history in the minds of Americans living hundreds of years removed from our founding. But that's too simple a story.  

The Flap Over Flags

Nov 12, 2020
WonderWhy / Creative Commons

On the surface, a flag is a piece of cloth with pretty colors and designs. That's the thing with flags. They're often judged on their aesthetics, but their power lies in how well their design captures the culture, religion, politics, and history of a place and its people. 

Ritter's First Move: Scanlon To Become Finance Co-Chair

Nov 10, 2020
Rep. Sean Scanlon, right, and Sen. Matthew Lesser at a press conference outlining a public health insurance option bill in 2019.
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

Rep. Sean Scanlon, D-Guilford, was introduced Tuesday as the new co-chair of the legislature’s Finance, Revenue and Bonding Committee as Rep. Matt Ritter, D-Hartford, made his first personnel moves as the incoming speaker of the House of Representatives.

Gage Skidmore / flickr creative commons

On most Mondays, we scramble around trying to put together a show reacting to the weekend's news.

But being that nothing much happened over this weekend, we decided just to take your calls this hour.

860-275-7266. Call in and talk to Colin about how you're feeling at the start of this new day, this new week -- this new era.

SIMSBURY, CT - NOVEMBER 03, 2020: A line to exit the poles at Latimer Lane School on November 03, 2020 in Simsbury, Connecticut.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

As votes are still being counted in critical swing states, Americans are holding their breath waiting to see who will be elected President.

There’s no doubt the 2020 election is determining the political future of this country.

But it’s also a major test of our democracy.

This hour, we talk with New York Times columnist Amanda Taub and political scientist Dr. Bilal Sekou.

We talk about what this election reveals about our system of government. We explore the consequences of our electoral college system and more.

Robert McNeely / Wikimedia Commons

The Trump campaign threatened legal challenges Wednesday, to force four states to stop counting ballots after Joe Biden's wins in the battleground states of Michigan and Wisconsin narrowed the President's path to reelection. How bad must an American president behave before a majority of voters repudiate him for his actions? 

Murray Carpenter / Maine Public

Sen. Susan Collins is keeping her job. In a big victory for New England Republicans, the Associated Press called the race for Collins Wednesday afternoon. Democrats hoped challenger Sara Gideon, speaker of Maine’s House of Representatives, would flip the seat, increasing their chance at winning control of the Senate.

"I feel like this is an affirmation of the work that I've been doing in Washington to fight for the people of Maine every day," Collins told a cheering crowd in Bangor, Maine.

Brad Greenlee / Creative Commons

The Colin McEnroe Show has an Election Day tradition of celebrating voters by inviting "citizen observers" from around the state to share their experience with voting. An ongoing pandemic and tensions stemming from a deeply divided electorate make this a year like no other.

Theresa Thompson / Creative Commons

Most of us are approaching Election Day with a mix of excitement, hope, and fear, as we live with surging numbers of coronavirus cases, threats of civil unrest, and uncertainty over when the election will be decided -- and who will get to decide. We want to hear from you.  Call us at 888-720-9677 or 888-720-WNPR to share your hopes and concerns about Election Day and for a post-election America.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

This fall, Logan Dancey, an associate professor at Wesleyan University, asked his students to work with three other schools to comb the websites of candidates for state Senate in Georgia, Minnesota and Connecticut. 

He was curious about how candidates featured issues like voting on their websites. 

Donkey Hotey / Creative Commons

The Trump Administration continues to downplay the pandemic, Vice-President Mike Pence campaigns even as staff members in his inner circle test positive for SARS-CoV-2, and Chief of Staff Mark Meadows said Sunday on CNN's "State of the Union," that the Administration is no longer going to control the pandemic.

The Senate Judiciary Committee voted Thursday to advance the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court. But the roll call vote was also notable for its silence from Democrats. 

As the committee clerk read off a list of names, she got no answer from several senators. The reason was simple: Those senators, including Connecticut’s Richard Blumenthal, weren’t there. 

Michael Winters / flickr creative commons

Secession is in the air. Britain withdrew from the European Union, Scotland wants out of the U.K., Catalonia from Spain, and, wait for it, California from the U.S. Yes, the days of our country's states being united may soon come to an end.

Right-Wing Extremism

Oct 15, 2020
Anthony Crider / Creative Commons

The pandemic, coupled with Black Lives Matter protests, and incendiary rhetoric from President Trump, has riled up anti-government militias across the US, most evident in the recent foiled plot by militia groups in Michigan, to kidnap Governor Gretchen Whitmer. 

Updated at 2:33 p.m. ET

The Senate Judiciary Committee held its fourth and final day of hearings on Thursday on President Trump's nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court.

If confirmed, Barrett, 48, would replace the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the high court.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

As we get closer to the election, the pace of events in Washington, D.C., only increases. U.S. Sen. Chris Murphy joined Connecticut Public Radio’s John Henry Smith on All Things Considered to talk about the COVID-19 outbreak at the White House, a troubling Twitter thread alleging that the Russians have actually ramped up interference this election season, and why he thinks the Trump administration is trying to politicize the Voice of America. 

Bernardo Wolff / Creative Commons

The populist backlash that led to the election of President Trump was decades in the making.  Like other populist leaders around the world, Trump gave voice to the resentment directed toward “elites” who devalue the hard work and dignity of workers without college degrees.

Updated at 8:18 p.m. ET

President Trump walked out of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Monday evening, planning on receiving the remainder of his treatment for COVID-19 at the White House.

He was seen pumping his fist in the air on the way out of the building and didn't respond to any questions from the press. Upon arriving back at the White House, Trump walked up the staircase of the South Portico entrance, removed his mask, gave reporters standing below a thumbs-up and saluted Marine One.

Showtime

The Nose had planned to discuss The Danish Girl star Eddie Redmayne standing up for J.K. Rowling and Rolling Stone updating their "500 Greatest Albums of All Time" list.

But then some news broke overnight.

Perhaps fittingly, though, The Nose watched Showtime's new miniseries, The Comey Rule, this week.

President Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden have their first debate Tuesday night in Cleveland.

Fox News' Chris Wallace is moderating the event, scheduled to begin at 9 p.m. ET. Debate topics will include the coronavirus pandemic, the economy and the Supreme Court.

Follow NPR's live coverage, including updates and fact checks.

Frankie Leon / Creative Commons

At a news briefing last week, President Trump refused to commit to a peaceful transition. Now, we're all talking about it.

Andrew E. Larsen / flickr creative commons

Kurt Andersen's last book, Fantasyland, looks at America's "centuries-old weakness for the untrue and irrational, and its spontaneous and dangerous flowering since the 1960s" and how it got us where we are today.

His new book, Evil Geniuses, is a kind of sequel, a companion. It's a parallel history, really, that looks more closely at "the quite deliberate reengineering of our economy and society since the 1960s."

This hour, public radio great Kurt Andersen on "the unmaking of America."

Updated at 11:01 a.m. ET

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is lying in repose at the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday and Thursday, a two-day event honoring a justice who was both a cultural and legal icon.

As Ginsburg's casket arrived at the high court, former law clerks lined the Supreme Court steps. Supreme Court police officers served as pallbearers. Then the justice's family, close friends and members of the court held a brief ceremony in the court's Great Hall.

Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

Connecticut recently passed a police accountability bill after the killing of George Floyd by police in Minneapolis. Though the bill is now law, legislative candidates who oppose it are using it as a political issue.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

Black Americans are more likely to be infected from COVID-19, be incarcerated, live in poverty, and/or be killed by the police than white Americans. It took a pandemic and the killing of George Floyd to crystallize those facts.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

In the wake of resistance to Black Lives Matter protests against racial injustice in cities like Portland, Oregon; Kenosha, Wisconsin; and others, we decided to take a look at race relations in the small towns and suburbs of Connecticut. What we found was disturbing. 

U.S. Census Bureau

The U.S. Census Bureau will end its counting efforts early later this month. But in many of Connecticut’s large cities, half or more of all residents did not fill out the self-reported survey.

Today, we talk about what’s at stake if Connecticut doesn’t get an accurate headcount.

Jerry Dougherty / Wikicommons

Have you ever heard of “philately?” Philately is the collection and study of postage stamps. Stamp collection dates back to the 19th century, as does the first United States Post Office Department, which is now just referred to as the United States Postal Service.

Vlad Povorny / Creative Commons

Officials in the Trump Administration last week videotaped both a naturalization ceremony held at the White House and an HUD official's interview with four New York City tenants on housing conditions. They then  played selected parts from each video at the Republican National Convention without the knowledge of the participants. 

The CDC updated testing guidelines last week to say that people who have been exposed to the virus but who don’t have symptoms or underlying risk factors, don't necessarily need to be tested. After public health officials complained that asymptomatic carriers are more likely to spread the virus, we learned that the recommendations came from the White House Coronavirus Task Force.  

Wisconsin Historical Society

America has long been attracted to charismatic demagogues who master the media of their time to tap into America’s insecurities. Long before Donald Trump descended a golden escalator in 2015 to announce he was running for president, anti-communist zealot Joseph McCarthy took America by storm.

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