gambling | Connecticut Public Radio
WNPR

gambling

The Massachusetts Gaming Commission is meeting in Springfield Wednesday to listen to public comments for the last time on MGM’s casino project.

Connecticut legislators are putting the finishing touches on their work—as this year's regular legislative session is scheduled to end at midnight tonight. While numerous bills still need approval from one chamber or another, many major pieces of legislation from this year's session have already been approved. The list includes a revised $19 billion dollar state budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1.

The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court will hear oral arguments Monday on whether a question to repeal casino gambling should appear on the November election ballot.

The decision by Attorney General Martha Coakley’s office to ban the question from the ballot is being challenged in the state’s highest court by anti-casino activists led by John Ribiero, chairman of the group Repeal the Casino Deal.

" There is no reason for us to be kept off the ballot."

purple_onion / Creative Commons

The electronic lottery game keno could come to Connecticut after all. Keno surfaced at the very end of last year's legislative session as a way to balance the new two year budget. But earlier this year, when a $500 million surplus was announced, lawmakers distanced themselves from the bingo-like game, and a bill to repeal keno seemed like a done deal.

Nervous about the prospect of a casino repeal referendum, MGM is asking Massachusetts gaming industry regulators to delay awarding a casino license for the company’s Springfield project.

MGM Springfield President Mike Mathis asked the Massachusetts Gaming Commission on Thursday to continue its evaluation of MGM’s $800 million casino project, but stop just short of  issuing a license.

"What we find ourselves in because of the repeal effort is the award of a license that does not allow for the commencement of construction."

Hundreds of advocates for prohibiting the storage of wastewater from hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” as it’s called, delivered petitions with over 5,600 signatures to lawmakers at a rally on Wednesday at the LOB. Though Connecticut doesn’t have the natural resource deposits to engage in the process of digging for natural gas,  many fear that companies seeking to store the waste created by the process will make their way to into Connecticut from outside the state. They want Governor Dannel Malloy and lawmakers to prohibit it.

Thousands of Massachusetts residents are being surveyed as part of multi-year, multi-million dollar research project on the social and economic impacts of introducing casino gambling to the state.

The members of the UMass Amherst led research team say initial results will be reported to the Massachusetts Gaming Commission in September. These findings will be the baseline that will be used to measure changes in problem gambling, domestic violence, housing prices and a host of other socio-economic factors as casinos open over the next one to three years.

Arbitrators have been chosen to decide how much two Massachusetts communities will be paid by MGM to mitigate the impacts of the proposed casino in downtown Springfield.

A gambling slump is eating into the profits of Mohegan Sun, but the 2,000 tribal members who draw benefits from the massive casino aren't feeling the pinch.

Supporters and opponents of MGM’s $800 million casino project in Springfield had a final chance last night to sound-off in front of Massachusetts gaming industry regulators.  The state gaming commission held a final public hearing in Springfield as it prepares to award the lone casino license in western Massachusetts where MGM Springfield is the only applicant.

Connecticut residents have until midnight tonight to obtain an insurance plan and avoid a federal tax penalty. Residents without health coverage can shop and compare plans at accesshealthct.com. Anyone who remains uninsured when the deadline expires will face a penalty of either 1 percent of the family's gross household income or $95 for each uninsured individual -- whichever amount is greater.

Casino City's Indian Gaming Industry Report, which was released today, says Connecticut was in the top five states in revenue brought in by the casinos, totaling $1.85 billion.

Brandon Lavallee / Pequot Museum

Federal authorities are considering changes to tribal recognition procedures and it could have a unique impact on Connecticut. But it's unclear exactly what rights any newly recognized tribes would have.

David Zeuthen / Creative Commons

Before Thomas Hooker founded the Colony of Connecticut, before Europeans even knew this land existed, the indigenous people already lived off the land. But over hundreds of years, the United States of America grew into what it is today, and the indigenous people were only granted small slices of land if they are "recognized" by the federal government.

purple_onion / Creative Commons

The General Assembly's Public Safety and Security committee heard public testimony Tuesday on a bill that would repeal last year's law establishing keno in Connecticut.

Metro-North President Joseph Giulietti sent his 100-day plan to state Transportation Commissioner James Redeker on Monday. Giulietti is promising to rebuild a culture of safety at Metro-North to serve as the railroad’s "unshakeable foundation." He agreed to a 100-day plan to improve the railroad’s safety and operational performance in meeting with Governor Dannel Malloy last month.

The Massachusetts Gaming Commission will be in western Massachusetts on Monday for a public hearing on MGM’s casino project in Springfield.

   The hearing that will take place at the West Springfield Middle School is one of two that will be held in the region as the gaming commission moves closer to awarding a license to develop and operate a resort casino. MGM is the only applicant in western Massachusetts.  The hearing will afford casino opponents, like Ted Steger, a chance to make a case against MGM’s project.

A harness racing track has been chosen by Massachusetts gambling regulators as the site of the state’s first casino.  If all goes according to schedule, the casino that will have up to 1,250 slot machines, but no table games, will open just over a year from now.

       The Massachusetts Gaming Commission, in the most significant decision of its two years in existence, voted 3-2 on Thursday to offer a license to Penn National Gaming to operate a slot machine parlor at the Plainridge harness racetrack.  The track is in Plainville on the Rhode Island border.

The Massachusetts Gaming Commission has voted to award the first casino gambling license in the state.

   The gaming commission voted 3 to 2 Thursday to award a license to Penn National Gaming to operate a slot machine parlor at a harness race track in Plainville on the Rhode Island border. Penn beat out two competitors for the lone slot license allowed by state law. Commissioner Bruce Stebbins said the vote is a milestone.

Mohegan Sun

Residents in Revere, Massachusetts approved on Tuesday a plan by Mohegan Sun to build a $1.3 billion resort casino in the town. The Hartford Courant reported that the proposal won 63 percent of the vote.

It's the Mohegan Tribal Gaming Authority's second attempt at the new gaming market in Massachusetts -- voters in Palmer recently rejected a casino plan there.

Panel Sees Possible Delay In Mass. Casino License

Feb 25, 2014

The Massachusetts Gaming Commission says it may have to push back the timetable for awarding the sole eastern Massachusetts resort casino license.

Because of a possible conflict of interest, the panel on Monday cut ties with a contractor that had been helping review surrounding community petitions for casino proposals in Everett and Revere.

Commissioners had been hoping to award the eastern license by May 30 and while that timetable is still possible, a delay in reviewing the petitions could push the decision back to the end of June.

The mayor of Springfield, Massachusetts is seeking to join an effort to block a voter referendum that could repeal the state’s casino gambling law.

State Public Safety Committee Raises Bill to Repeal Keno

Feb 20, 2014
Connecticut Commission on Children

Connecticut's Public Safety and Security Committee met Thursday morning to raise a bill on Keno in the state. State Representative Stephen Dargan (D-West Haven) is proposing legislation to repeal last year's bill that legalized the game in Connecticut.

The controversial game is looking less likely to survive the current session, as more lawmakers express an interest in repealing legislation that made it legal. 

Marc Moss / Creative Commons

Keno in Connecticut may be over before it begins.

Less than a year after a Keno bill passed the legislature in the eleventh hour, and was signed into law by Governor Dannel Malloy, legislative leaders are making a push for its repeal, citing an improving economy.

Democratic Speaker of the House Brendan Sharkey announced his support for a repeal during remarks to the Connecticut Council of Small Towns.

The Massachusetts Gaming Commission will announce a decision Tuesday on the petitions from three municipalities seeking mitigation payments if an MGM casino is built in downtown Springfield.

Massachusetts Gaming Commission Chairman Stephen Crosby is asking a federal judge to toss out a lawsuit by Caesars Entertainment.

The Massachusetts Gaming Commission will hear Tuesday from cities and towns seeking compensation from casino operators. 

Hampden, Longmeadow and Northampton have failed to reach agreements with MGM on compensation for potential impacts if the company builds a resort casino in downtown Springfield, so they’ve asked the commission to intervene.  Northampton Mayor David Narkewicz said a consultant figures businesses will lose up to $8 million in annual sales, costing  up to 180 job s  if a casino is built 16 miles away.

The lengthy process to bring casino gambling to Massachusetts has entered a final phase. The Massachusetts Gaming Commission will spend the next few months carefully evaluating projects before coming to a decision on issuing licenses.  Supporters of the MGM casino project in Springfield are already anticipating a groundbreaking.

MGM Resorts International is the only applicant for the lone casino license in western Massachusetts, but Massachusetts Gaming Commission Chairman Stephen Crosby says the five-member commission is not obligated to award the license to MGM.

The lone applicant for the western Massachusetts casino license pitched the project to state gaming industry regulators today.  The 90-minute public presentation marked the beginning of an evaluation process that is expected to culminate with the awarding of a casino license in the spring.

   MGM  Resorts International CEO James Murran told the Massachusetts Gaming Commission that even though all competitors have fallen by the wayside, MGM’s Springfield project is the right choice to be awarded a lucrative casino license.

Mohegan Sun

An overflow crowd packed the Boston convention center on Wednesday to hear from the firms competing for a coveted eastern Massachusetts resort casino license. Connecticut's Mohegan Sun is one of two companies in the running for the license.

Pages