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Federal Budget

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Connecticut Public Radio looked at the federal spending bill signed into law by President Donald Trump on March 23, 2018. How is Connecticut impacted by the legislation?

Connecticut's 2nd District representative Joe Courtney says the Trump administration's transfer of $3.6 billion from military construction projects to pay for more of the wall along the southern U.S. border sets a "dangerous and irresponsible" precedent. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The United States Senate has passed legislation that would provide Puerto Rico with more disaster relief money. But its ultimate passage has been delayed.

What's Your Question For U.S. Senator Chris Murphy?

Apr 5, 2019
Chion Wolf / WNPR

When it comes to responding to the nation's gun violence epidemic, Congress is finally starting to take some action. At least in the U.S. House of Representatives, which, in February, passed legislation to expand background checks for the sale of firearms.

The question now is what is the Republican-controlled Senate going to do.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut lawmakers want Congress to send more disaster relief dollars to Puerto Rico.

State Economic Indicators Remain A Mixed Bag

Mar 13, 2019
Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut's unemployment rate is at a 17-year low. The state has stockpiled $1.2 billion in its budget reserve fund. But it's still not in a position to go on anything resembling a spending spree.

Not with state Comptroller Kevin Lembo warning lawmakers against counting on a repeat of last year's spike in tax collections. Job gains in 2018 also were not nearly as robust as initially reported. And no one can rule out the possibility of an economic downturn lurking around the corner.

Updated at 7:27 p.m. ET

A closed-door briefing for congressional leaders in the White House Situation Room on Wednesday failed to resolve any issues between Democrats and the Trump administration over funding for border security.

The stalemate has led to a partial government shutdown, now nearing the two-week mark.

"I don't think any particular progress was made," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., told reporters afterward.

The partial shutdown of the U.S. government that began Saturday affects about a quarter of the government. About 800,000 federal workers will feel the effects as lawmakers try to come to an agreement on a set of spending bills to keep the government funded.

A central sticking point remains funding for President Trump's proposed border wall, and with the Senate adjourned until Thursday, there is no apparent quick end in sight.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

United States Senator Chris Murphy told employees of the Mazak Corporation in Windsor Locks Monday that a re-industrialization of America is afoot. He’s excited about Connecticut’s manufacturing jobs outlook, but he said that even more jobs can be had if the Pentagon makes a deeper commitment to “buy American.”

THOMAS HAWK / CREATIVE COMMONS

Lawmakers in Washington are attempting to overhaul the criminal justice system. Their aim is to find a solution to mass incarceration and reduce recidivism rates. But one expert doesn’t think the measure goes far enough. 

Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

Last fall, President Donald Trump announced that he wanted the federal government to stop funding the National Endowment for the Arts. Reaction to that proposal was swift and bipartisan -- and in fact, in the budget that passed last month, there’s not a cut, but a tiny increase in arts funding. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

When the massive omnibus spending bill was passed by Congress and signed by President Donald Trump last month, Community Development Block Grants actually received an eight percent funding increase through September 2020.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

A federal budget cycle akin to a wild roller coaster ride ended up boosting funding for some environmental work. With his signature last week, President Donald Trump signed into law a $1.3 trillion spending package that shores up funding for two conservation and research programs in Long Island Sound.

Garry Monk, executive director of the National Veterans Council for Legal Redress speaks in Hartford with Sen. Chris Murphy looking on.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Inside the omnibus appropriations bill recently signed into law is legislation that, for the first time, provides mental health care for tens of thousands of combat veterans and sexual assault victims who’ve received other-than-honorable discharges.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut will benefit from new federal money to safeguard its elections process. The cash is part of the $1.3 trillion spending bill passed by Congress last week.

Electric Boat

Connecticut’s entire congressional delegation voted for the omnibus spending bill which was signed, rather grudgingly, last week by President Donald Trump.