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families

Jeff Eaton / flickr

Americans like to argue, a lot. In politics, in media, and in society at large, arguing has (arguably) become the default means by which we handle disagreement. But is it the most effective way, and has our readiness to wage a war with words gotten out of hand?

Tony Bacewicz / C-HIT

Last May, Samantha Collins’s drug use, legal problems and dealings with the Connecticut Department of Children and Families forced her to strike a bargain with the agency.

U.S. Navy

The community of Watertown, Connecticut is mourning the loss of Tan Huynh, who was among seven U.S. Navy sailors who died when their destroyer collided with a merchant ship off the coast of Japan on Saturday. 

Michelle Lee / Creative Commons

A bill that would have brought paid family leave to Connecticut died in the legislature this week, despite having been a priority for Democratic Senate leadership. Though the bill had been the subject of bipartisan negotiations earlier in the session, it failed to get the support it needed to advance. 

UW Health / Creative Commons

Medicaid has become an increasingly important source of health insurance coverage for children in the United States. That’s especially true for children living in small towns and rural areas, according to a new report.

Kamaljith K V / Creative Commons

This hour: family narratives -- how we share the stories of our lives and how those stories help shape who we are. 

Sam Greenhalgh / Creative Commons

Dyslexia is considered the most common learning disorder and yet it is often undiagnosed and rarely understood.

This hour, we look to better understand the dyslexic mind.

Older, Wiser, And Out Of The Closet

May 22, 2017
Photo courtesy of Dr. Loren Olson

Coming out as gay can be difficult — even traumatizing — for young people. But what is coming out like for older men and women, some who were once married to heterosexual spouses and who have children?

This hour, we revisit our conversation with Dr. Loren Olson, author of Finally Out: Letting Go of Living Straight

Demos

This hour, we tackle issues involving race, policy, and U.S. democracy with Demos President Heather McGhee.

Plus: a look at efforts to establish paid leave in Connecticut. If passed, how might new legislation impact the state's women of color? We find out and we also hear from you. 

Donnie Ray Jones / Creative Commons

Sleep. We all need it. Yet, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, roughly one in three U.S. adults does not get enough of it.

Coming up, we consider the impact of this and other sleep-related trends with Dr. Meir Kryger. His new book is called The Mystery of Sleep.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The screening process for refugees entering the U.S. involves multi-layered security checks, interviews, and an overseas medical exam. After their arrival, families will undergo another health assessment, usually coordinated by a resettlement agency.

It’s where their stories begin to unfold to the doctors and physicians-in-training at Yale University's Pediatric Refugee Clinic.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It’s been nearly 50 years since a US Supreme Court decision put an end to state laws banning interracial marriage.

This hour, we learn about the civil rights case, Loving v. Virginia. Have society’s perceptions really changed from that landmark decision in 1967?

Many refugees who arrive on U.S. soil finally feel safe after decades of war or torture or loss of family members. But just because they're removed from physical harm, it doesn't mean the pain is over. 

Connecticut State Library

April 6, 2017 marks 100 years since the United States officially entered the First World War — igniting the journey for thousands of young men to the deadly trenches of Europe.

This hour, we learn about the soldiers and hear how Connecticut was one of just a few states with records that explained how some of these men viewed their service. 

Older, Wiser, And Out Of The Closet

Mar 31, 2017
Photo courtesy of Dr. Loren Olson

Coming out as gay can be difficult — even traumatizing — for young people. But what is coming out like for older men and women, some who were once married to heterosexual spouses and who have children?

This hour, we learn more from Dr. Loren Olson, author of Finally Out: Letting Go of Living Straight

William Gantz flickr.com/photos/bilg/326347413 / Creative Commons

An estimated 95,000 young children in Connecticut under age six have experienced a potentially traumatic event. There's a new effort underway in the state to expand services focused on their developmental needs.

Shannon Hicks / The Newtown Bee

In their new documentary, Kim Snyder and Maria Cuomo Cole provide an eye-opening narrative of life after Sandy Hook -- the deadly mass shooting that thrust Connecticut and gun reform into the national spotlight. This hour, we sit down with the filmmakers and learn about the multi-year journey that brought "Newtown" to the screen. 

The world is facing its greatest humanitarian crisis since 1945, says the United Nations humanitarian coordinator, Stephen O'Brien.

O'Brien told the U.N. Security Council on Friday that more than 20 million people across four countries in Africa and the Middle East are at risk of starvation and famine.

"We stand at a critical point in our history," he said. "Without collective and coordinated global efforts, people will simply starve to death."

An interview about South Korea's political upheaval became one of the most popular things on the Internet on Friday, when the children of professor Robert E. Kelly became the inadvertent stars of his spot on the BBC.

Michelle Lee flickr.com/photos/michellerlee/7610741336 / Creative Commons

The Connecticut General Assembly is considering a proposal that would provide for paid family medical leave, and state Senate leaders from both parties are apparently working on compromise language. 

Bart Everson / Creative Commons

Get the lead out -- at least, that's what Connecticut renters Rosie Gallant and Adam Golka hoped to do after discovering the toxin in their Woodstock home. This hour, we hear their story and find out how repeated lead exposure has impacted the health of their infant daughter. 

US Department of Education / Creative Commons

Billionaire Betsy DeVos is the new Secretary for the US Department of Education.

This hour, how will she impact public school education nationwide including here in Connecticut? We hear from educators within traditional public and charter schools — and we want to hear from you, too.

A family of Syrian refugees landed Friday at the Manchester-Boston Regional Airport in New Hampshire, completing a journey that almost never happened.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The opioid epidemic in our nation upends lives and it’s the family members of addicts who intimately know the deadly costs of substance abuse.

This hour, we hear the personal story of one Connecticut mother and son. Despite the many hurdles addiction placed in their way, we hear how they are now working to help other families overcome these same hurdles.

In the U.S., protests, confusion and anger have followed President Trump’s executive order that prevents new refugees from entering the country for 120 days, suspends resettlement for Syrians indefinitely and bars travelers from seven predominantly Muslim countries for 90 days.

Md saad andalib / Creative Commons

It’s been nearly 50 years since a US Supreme Court decision put an end to state laws banning interracial marriage.

This hour, we learn about the civil rights case, Loving v. Virginia. Have society’s perceptions really changed from that landmark decision in 1967?

PBS

For nearly four and a half decades, Sonia Manzano was Maria -- a recurring female lead on the PBS television series "Sesame Street."

Last year, Manzano retired from the show and published a memoir. It’s called Becoming Maria: Love and Chaos in the South Bronx.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The Commissioner of Connecticut’s Department of Children and Families said she doesn’t believe her office would benefit from the oversight of an outside ombudsman. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

State officials, community providers and youth advocates are continuing their work to reform juvenile justice in Connecticut. The latest efforts have been focused on a plan to close the state’s juvenile jail in Middletown.

This hour, Department of Children and Families Commissioner Joette Katz and Deputy Commissioner Fernando Muñiz join us in-studio to talk about the department’s plan to shutter the Connecticut Juvenile Training School and its other responsibilities as the state’s child welfare agency. 

DANIEL LOBO / CREATIVE COMMONS

Connecticut's Office of Early Childhood is changing their eligibility rules for a child care subsidy program due in part to increased costs.

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