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Daniel Paquet / Creative Commons

Two Connecticut residents infected with the influenza virus have died, the state’s first flu-related deaths of the 2019-20 season, according to state public health officials. 

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Patricia Banach just wanted her annual flu shot.

As the weather got colder, she and her husband, both in their 70s, knew that the chances of falling ill were higher, so they set out to a local pharmacy near their home in Somers to get vaccinated.

But it didn’t turn out to be that simple.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio


Denise Guillemette sat at a table preparing dozens of flu vaccines that she would eventually give to residents who came to a recent community clinic in Glastonbury.

“Come on down,” she called to the next person in line waiting their turn. “How are you feeling today, good?”

A recent study found that about a third of older adults don't store their firearms in the safest way -- locked up and unloaded.
Pixabay

Daryl Howard turns 65 in October. He has a Glock .45-caliber handgun stored in his desk at home, but hopes never to use it.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

The state is making contingency plans in the event that 2,500 nursing home workers in Connecticut go out on strike next month.

Careene Reid, a certified nursing assistant, speaks at a press conference April 15 at the legislative office building in Hartford about demands for increased wages and better staffing in Connecticut nursing homes.
Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Nursing home workers in Connecticut are planning to strike if they don’t see increased funding for more staff and better benefits in the next two weeks.

Elder Abuse Investigations More Than Doubled In Seven Years

Apr 3, 2019
Rita Pompano of West Haven says she was a victim of elder abuse in 2011, when her husband Ralph tormented her and beat her daily for seven months before she was able to escape with her son's help.
Carl Jordan Castro / C-HIT.org

State investigations of elder abuse, ranging from neglect to emotional abuse to physical abuse, more than doubled in Connecticut between 2011 and 2017, from 3,529 to 7,196.

Nathalie Taranto, 85, of Easton, said she's worried about how a proposed Connecticut asset test would affect her eligibility in the Medicare Savings Program.
Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut is considering reinstating an asset test for Medicare Savings Programs. State officials say it will save money while program enrollees are worried about losing coverage and experiencing higher health care costs.

Pixabay

A nursing home’s role is to care for its patients, not compromise their health. Yet, across Connecticut, a number of facilities have come up short in fulfilling this most basic function.

This hour, we take an in-depth look at this issue. We talk with reporters, regulators, and advocates, and we also hear from you. 

For Many Baby Boomers, Livin' Large Means Moving To The City

Feb 8, 2019
Tony Luong / Courtesy of AARP

Their parents may have spent their golden years in vast 55 and older retirement communities, or remote cookie-cutter housing developments in the suburbs. But more and more, baby boomers are deciding that's definitely not for them.

They want to live in walkable, vibrant neighborhoods where there's a mix of young and old, lots of dining options, and plenty of culture.

Pixabay

A nursing home’s role is to care for its patients, not compromise their health. Yet, across Connecticut, a number of facilities have come up short in fulfilling this most basic function.

This hour, we take an in-depth look at this issue. We talk with reporters, regulators, and advocates, and we also hear from you. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Senior citizens and residents living below the poverty line may soon struggle to meet their basic food needs because of the government shutdown.

Andrew Malone / Creative Commons

The recent heat wave is set to come to an end, but temperatures are expected to stay in the low 90’s until the end of the week. Officials warned people to stay inside and keep cool in order to avoid heat related illness.

scyther5 / iStock

Seniors lose billions of dollars a year to financial fraud, ranging from mass mailings and threatening robocalls, to telemarketing and identity theft. Experts around the country, including Connecticut, are focused on combating the problem. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour: the myths and realities of end-of-life treatment in the U.S.

Coming up, we learn about a recent Kaiser Health News investigation and explore the history of hospice in Connecticut.

Do you know someone who has received or is currently undergoing hospice care? How has that experience affected you, your friends, your family? 

you me / Creative Commons

This hour: the myths and realities of end-of-life treatment in the U.S.

Coming up, we learn about a recent Kaiser Health News investigation and explore the history of hospice in Connecticut.

Do you know someone who has received or is currently undergoing hospice care? How has that experience affected you, your friends, your family? 

Donnie Ray Jones / Creative Commons

Sleep. We all need it. Yet, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, roughly one in three U.S. adults do not get enough of it.

Coming up, we consider the impact of this and other sleep-related trends with Dr. Meir Kryger. His new book is called The Mystery of Sleep.

The Senate vote on the health care bill has been pushed back, but it still has a lot of people in the nursing home industry worried. About two-thirds of nursing home residents are paid for by Medicaid. And the Congressional Budget Office found that the Senate health care bill would cut Medicaid by more than $770 billion over the next decade.

A 101-year-old man has set a world record for oldest skydiver, according to the British company Skydive Buzz.

Bryson William Verdun Hayes, known as Verdun, made a tandem jump at the age of 101 years and 38 days, the company says.

Jobs For Felons Hub / Creative Commons

Connecticut’s prison population is getting older, upping the demand for healthcare including hospice programs that serve inmates and ex-offenders.

This hour, we find out what it means to die with dignity behind bars. 

Donnie Ray Jones / Creative Commons

Sleep. We all need it. Yet, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, roughly one in three U.S. adults does not get enough of it.

Coming up, we consider the impact of this and other sleep-related trends with Dr. Meir Kryger. His new book is called The Mystery of Sleep.

sima dimitric / Creative Commons

At the Fresh River Healthcare nursing home in East Windsor, the chance that a short-stay patient will end up back in the hospital within 30 days of arriving at the facility is less than eight percent.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

A device to treat Alzheimer’s Disease using radio waves has gone into clinical trials in Arizona. The trial is partially backed by science carried out in Connecticut. 

Lori Mack / WNPR

As Americans continue to live longer, their chance of developing diseases like dementia and Alzheimer's increases. And family members are often assuming the unpaid role of caregiver, resulting in reduced wages and Social Security benefits. 

The federal government has announced a new rule that guarantees the rights of patients and families to sue long-term care facilities.

The rule, released Wednesday by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, bans so-called pre-dispute binding arbitration clauses in nursing home contracts, which require patients and families to settle any dispute over care in arbitration, rather than through the court system.

The rule applies to facilities that receive money from Medicare or Medicaid — which is nearly all of them.

Hebrew HealthCare

Hebrew HealthCare, which runs a nursing home, hospital and a wide range of care services in the greater Hartford area, announced it will lease out its flagship facility and restructure the rest of its operations under Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

Raining via Wikimedia Commons / Public Domain

Connecticut still ranks high among states in the use of antipsychotic drugs for elderly nursing home residents, but its rate of use has dropped 33 percent since 2011 -- a bigger decline than the national average -- new government data show.

jglazer75 / Creative Commons

Connecticut's newly formed state Commission on Women, Children and Seniors is beginning to take shape.

Patrick Doheny / Creative Commons

The world is getting older. According to the National Institutes of Health, the number of people aged 65 and up will grow to 1.6 billion by mid-century. 

Penn State / Creative Commons

When Barbara Bradley Hagerty set out to write her new book Life Reimagined, her goal was simple: learn how to avoid a midlife crisis. 

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