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GOVERNMENT OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND / CREATIVE COMMONS

New and corrected data on school vaccination rates were released Friday after the state gave out controversial and disputed information last week.

Officials from the state Department of Public Health said they worked with school officials to identify and correct errors in a report that shows the number of unvaccinated children attending every school in the state.

The Big Business Of School Security

May 10, 2019
Carlos Osorio / Associated Press

As school security has become a top priority in communities across the country, security companies have found a thriving new market for their products. But in a sea of gadgets and technology, how do school districts effectively sift through and find the products that can truly help prevent a school shooting?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

When Rabbi Philip Lazowski was just eleven years old, the Nazis invaded his hometown and began the mass slaughter of Jewish residents.

This hour we sit down with Rabbi Lazowski, a Holocaust survivor and longtime leader in the Greater Hartford Jewish community, to hear his story. After witnessing one of the worst sides of humanity, how did he maintain his faith and find the strength to help others?

Wilfredo Lee / Associated Press

As communities all over the country continue to debate how to keep children safe at school, many districts have turned to School Resource Officers, or SROs -- essentially uniformed and armed police officers in school. But a new study in Connecticut shows that SROs can have a negative impact on students. 

Russ / Creative Commons

A Trinity College professor who made controversial comments on social media related to racism two years ago has sparked another conversation, this time accusing the Obamas of perpetuating systemic white racism.

U.S. Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta led a roundtable discussion on the Eastern Connecticut Manufacturing Pipeline Initiative in Montville on Tuesday, April 16. The pipeline is funded by Acosta's department through a local board.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The United States Department of Labor Secretary was in Connecticut on Tuesday, April 16 to see for himself efforts to reskill the state’s manufacturing workforce.

Bill Smith / Flickr Creative Commons

Literacy. It's something many of us take for granted. The ability to read health forms, headlines, or the latest bestsellers. Yet, across the U.S., there are millions of adults who have difficulty reading.

This hour, we find out why. We talk with literacy experts and advocates, and we also hear from you.

East Hartford Superintendent Nathan Quesnel speaks at the announcement Friday April 5, watched by Governor Ned Lamont and Ray and Barbara Dalio.
Adam Hushin / Connecticut Public Radio

Billionaire hedge fund manager Ray Dalio and his wife Barbara are making a $100 million donation to Connecticut Public Schools. It’s part of what the state hopes will be a $300 million public private partnership. 

Sage Ross / Flickr

Thirteen Yale University professors are taking a stand against the school in order to get long-term support for an ethnic studies program.

Lamont Tours Essex School To Promote Consolidation

Mar 31, 2019
Adam Hushin / Connecticut Public Radio

Students at Essex Elementary School received a visit from Governor Ned Lamont in their classroom on Friday, as he continues to push for districts to consider consolidating services. Lamont was touring the collaborative preschool program between the towns of Chester, Deep River, and Essex that has been running for 20 years, and -- according to his office -- has proved to be a significant saving for taxpayers. 

Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

Ebenezer Bassett was the first African American to graduate from the college now known as Central Connecticut State University. Then, in 1869, he became the first African American to serve as a U.S. diplomat.

Now 150 years after that appointment by President Ulysses S. Grant, CCSU has renamed its Social Sciences Hall in honor of Bassett — a recognition that comes with another historic first, university officials said this week.

Carlos Mejia / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

Venture into one New London, Connecticut nonprofit and you will find yourself surrounded by art. Not just any art, either. Art inspired by the rich cultures of Latin America.

This hour, we go inside Expressiones Cultural Center. We meet up with one of the nonprofit's co-founders, and wander through the mind of its current artist in residence: a forestry engineer from Lima, Peru. 

Taylin Santiago, a New London High School student who identifies as Afro-Latino, testified in front of the Education Committee during a public hearing about H.B. 7082.
Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Do you remember high school history? The subject has the reputation of being “boring”, thick with names and dates that can be a chore to remember. But this hour we ask: How do the history lessons we learn in school shape the way we see the world around us?

Pixabay / Creative Commons

Money appears to be no object for the 33 parents recently charged by federal authorities for paying bribes so that their kids could get in to elite schools like Georgetown, UCLA, and Yale.

David DesRoches / Connecticut Public Radio

Over 1,300 students, faculty members, and others have signed a petition asking for the state to stop its plan to consolidate the 12 public community colleges into one system. 

They’re calling themselves the Reluctant Warriors. 

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

A new education bill seeks to add African-American studies to the social studies curriculum in Connecticut public schools. High school students testifying before the legislature this week said loud and clear that Black history is more than just Rosa Parks, slavery and civil rights.

The Realities Of Rural Life

Feb 28, 2019
Kris Notaro / Creative Commons

An estimated 20 percent of Americans reside in rural communities. What are the needs of this population? And to what extent are those needs being met? This hour, we take a closer look.

We also sit down with Anne Torsiglieri, whose one-woman show "A" Train comes to Hartford this week. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Governor Ned Lamont discussed with national members of the American Federation of Teachers ways to target – and then retain – teachers.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

It’s something you might expect to see on a poster in a dorm. Bright green leaves, fanned and serrated.

It’s cannabis. Except today, it’s center stage on a table in the biggest lecture hall on UConn’s campus. But first, it had to get there.

Adam Hushin / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut has launched a new collaborative effort to support manufacturing industry in the state. The collaboration, called “TEAM Works,” -- Technology, Education, and Advanced Manufacturing -- joins together Connecticut’s public and private colleges, comprehensive and technical high schools, small and large manufacturers, and state agencies. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Students at Yale University are protesting a plan to permanently remove some books from a campus library in favor of more study space.

UConn Trustees Appoint UVA Provost Thomas C. Katsouleas As New President

Feb 5, 2019
Thomas Katsouleas
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

With a unanimous vote Tuesday morning, the University of Connecticut Board of Trustees appointed Thomas C. Katsouleas as the university’s 16th president. Katsouleas, currently provost and executive vice president of the University of Virginia, said he was “honored and humbled” to be appointed. 

Bill Smith / Creative Commons

Literacy. It's something many of us take for granted. The ability to read health forms, headlines, or the latest bestsellers. Yet, across the U.S., there are millions of adults who have difficulty reading.

This hour, we find out why. We talk with literacy experts and advocates, and we also hear from you.

Speaking Up About Miscarriages

Jan 14, 2019
The Sleep Judge / Creative Commons

Many women who become pregnant miscarry without knowing it. Yet miscarriage is not something we, as a society, often talk about. Why?

This hour, we take an in-depth look and we also hear from you. Have you or a loved one ever miscarried? Where did you turn for support? 

Yale University

Renowned cellist and teacher Aldo Parisot died last weekend at the age of 100. Parisot's legacy goes far beyond Yale University, where for 60 years he taught some of the best cellists in the world.

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

When Rabbi Philip Lazowski was just eleven years old, the Nazis invaded his hometown and began the mass slaughter of Jewish residents.

This hour we sit down with Rabbi Lazowski, a Holocaust survivor and longtime leader in the Greater Hartford Jewish community, to hear his story. After witnessing one of the worst sides of humanity, how did he maintain his faith and find the strength to help others?

Dave White / Creative Commons

For interview highlights from this show, click here. 

It’s been fifteen years since the death of Fred Rogers -- a man who, for decades, served as the cardigan-donning host and creator of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.

Rogers’ life is now the focus of a new Maxwell King biography -- aptly titled The Good Neighbor. This hour, we sit down with King for a special preview of the book. 

Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

Governor Dannel Malloy faced many challenges in his eight year tenure. While the state budget crisis may have grabbed the headlines, other structural issues with Connecticut’s economy also consumed his attention. One of the biggest of these - the skills gap. 

Courtesy: Workforce Alliance

With national unemployment rates the lowest they’ve been in nearly half a century, many employers can’t find enough skilled workers. In Connecticut, manufacturers are especially feeling the pinch. The state Department of Labor estimates the industry will need to hire tens of thousands of qualified workers in the next five years.

Pexels

The number of kids missing school days in Hartford Public Schools is higher than both the national average and the state average. As a result of this struggle to keep every student in the classroom, Hartford is reaching out for help to Attendance Works, a national organization dedicated to reducing chronic absenteeism.

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