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Bonnie-Brown / Creative Commons

The state of Connecticut has released the details of its plan to return K-12 students to in-person classes in the fall. So what could it mean in practice? Teachers representatives are concerned and call the plan “lacking.”

Bus Company First Student Gets $7M For Not Driving Kids

Jun 30, 2020
Sam Gurwitt / New Haven Independent

New Haven will pay its school bus contractor $1.5 million less than normal for time the buses were idle during the pandemic — but more than they should, according to some Board of Education members.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

The academic school year has just ended, but parents, students and teachers are already wondering what next year will look like. This hour, Education Commissioner Miguel Cardona joins us to talk about the state's plan to reopen schools in the fall.

Connecticut Orders Schools To Reopen In Fall, Teachers Are Concerned

Jun 25, 2020
School buses
Yehyun Kim / CTMirror.org

Connecticut schools will reopen for a five-day school week in the fall – as long as the coronavirus behaves, Gov. Ned Lamont announced Thursday.

Governor Ned Lamont
Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

The school year may have just ended, but plans are taking shape for the return of students inside schools this fall. Gov. Ned Lamont announced the plans Thursday, noting that several COVID-19 trends are holding steady in Connecticut while the virus continues to spread in other parts of the country.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Faced with a massive deficit -- only exacerbated by the economic pain of coronavirus shutdowns -- the University of Connecticut’s athletics department is making cuts.

UConn Students Contemplate Life Back On Campus

Jun 22, 2020
Jackson Mitchell / WNPR

The University of Connecticut plans on having students back on campus for classes in the fall, after students were sent home in March to shelter during the coronavirus pandemic.

But the announcement of a return to campus life is drawing mixed reactions.

Ryan Martins / Connecticut Public Radio

It’s been a school year like no other. Once the coronavirus hit, schools across Connecticut and around the country had to adapt to distance learning for a large part of this academic year.  

Naugatuck High School moved its entire curriculum online.

Courtesy: Shardé M. Davis

Shardé M. Davis, a communications professor at the University of Connecticut, is the co-founder of the Twitter hashtag #BlackintheIvory. Along with Joy Melody Woods, a Ph.D. student at the University of Texas at Austin, Davis sparked a public conversation about racism in academia when she tweeted out some of her own experiences as a Black scholar.

Quinnipiac University
Wikimedia Commons

The financial impact of COVID-19 continues to wreak havoc on university budgets. This week, Quinnipiac University announced it will lay off or furlough nearly 170 employees due to the pandemic. 

After the death of George Floyd, demonstrators rallied outside police departments, on highways and through downtowns across New England calling for police reforms and racial justice.

Amid these protests, Alicia Thomas, a special education teacher in Springfield, Mass., posted on Facebook about the role of teachers in dismantling racism — and how school administrators could do more to support teachers of color.

UConn To Resume Classes In August, But Only With Major Pandemic Protections

Jun 10, 2020
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

University of Connecticut students will be able to return to classes Aug. 31, but President Thomas Katsouleas warned Wednesday it will be an “academic semester and campus experience that will be unlike anything we have seen previously.”

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

Glastonbury High School seniors are receiving their diplomas now, even though the governor has paved the way for group graduation ceremonies during the COVID-19 pandemic.

coronavirus, Weaver, High Schools
Joe Amon/Connecticut Public/NENC

We’ve heard a lot about the distance learning going on at K-12 schools during this coronavirus pandemic shutdown. But there’s a good number of kids who are not distance learning for a variety of reasons and badly need schools to reopen. 

U.S. Coast Guard Academy (screengrab)

The uncertainty of coronavirus forced the U.S. Coast Guard Academy to do something it’s never done -- commission officers virtually.

Gov. Ned Lamont
Cloe Poisson / CTMirror.org

As Connecticut’s education partnership with Dalio Philanthropies evaporated Tuesday, an aggrieved Gov. Ned Lamont insisted his administration wasn’t done teaming with talented individuals from the private-sector.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Two Republican state lawmakers were directly called out by Barbara Dalio as she and her husband, billionaire hedge fund owner Ray Dalio, announced they’ll end the multimillion-dollar philanthropic partnership they’d formed with the state of Connecticut. 

Gov. Lamont Announces End To Connecticut's Education Partnership With Dalio Philanthropies

May 19, 2020
Gov. Ned Lamont
Cloe Poisson / CTMirror.org

Gov. Ned Lamont announced the dissolution Tuesday of Connecticut’s education partnership with hedge fund giant Ray Dalio’s philanthropic group — a deal marred by transparency issues and oversight scandals — less than one year after its creation.

Pixabay

Daycares have continued to stay open throughout the quarantine, but many parents have opted to keep their children at home. When Connecticut starts to open up this week and more parents head back to work, many will need childcare. This hour, how are daycares taking care of kids in a pandemic? Later, going to camp can be the highlight of any child’s summer.

Kenneth C. Zirkel

As the school year winds down for students, universities and colleges across the state are starting to make a plan for the fall semester. This hour, we’re talking to college faculty and students about what their online learning experience has been like so far, and what their hopes are for the next academic year. How are universities preparing for an outbreak on campus? College isn’t just academics; what will collegiate sports and student organizations look like in the 20-21 academic year? 

We want to hear from you. Are you a student or a faculty member at a Connecticut college or university ? How will your school hold classes during the next academic year? 

foodshare
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

As Connecticut’s death toll continues to climb and the number of COVID-19-related hospitalizations continues to decline, Gov. Ned Lamont is calling for volunteers -- to help children and adults with intellectual disabilities and help get groceries and meals to senior citizens.

Glenn Lungarini
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

The Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference canceled its spring sports season this week after news that public schools will remain closed for the remainder of the academic year. Executive director Glen Lungarini talked with All Things Considered host John Henry Smith about this decision and the criticism he faced when he canceled the winter sports playoff schedule back in March.

ccarlstead / Creative Commons

Parents have gotten news they were expecting about continued distance learning, but it’s still going to be a rough two months. Most states in the nation had already made this decision, including Massachusetts, New York, and Rhode Island.

Hartford High School
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

Gov. Ned Lamont on Tuesday officially canceled in-person schooling for Connecticut students for the rest of the 2019-20 academic year.

Miguel Cardona
Courtesy: NEAG School of Education, UConn

It’s official: K-12 education in Connecticut for the rest of the school year will be online only. Gov. Ned Lamont confirmed Tuesday that students and teachers will not return to campus because of the coronavirus threat. Connecticut Public Radio’s All Things Considered spoke with Miguel Cardona, commissioner of the state Department of Education, about the decision.

Lamont Orders Connecticut Schools Closed For The Academic Year

May 5, 2020
Governor Ned Lamont
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Gov. Ned Lamont will order K-12 schools throughout Connecticut to stay closed for the remainder of the academic year because of the health threat posed by COVID-19.

Thomas Katsouleas
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Colleges and universities around Connecticut are wrestling with what the country is wrestling with: how and when to get back to business amid a global pandemic.

Pixfuel

One day, we might view online learning as a normal part of any curriculum. But right now, it’s anything but that. 

This hour, we discuss challenges faced with K-12 online learning, and homeschooling. What barriers are students running into when it comes to the Zoom classroom? Do school districts need to prepare for academic regression in the next school year? 

We want to hear from you. Are you a parent? What guidance did you receive from your school district before switching to online learning?

Children And Parents Feel The Strain Of Confinement

Apr 29, 2020
Laura Bower-Phipps and her daughter, Betty, read the comics page. During this time of social distancing, Betty misses her friends and school.
Contributed photo.

Weeks into staying home from preschool, Betty, 4, threw herself on the floor and had a screaming meltdown. She had had a Zoom meeting with her class earlier that day, and every little thing was setting her off.

Lamont To Keep Schools Closed Until May 20, Maybe Longer

Apr 9, 2020
coronavirus testing
Chloe Poisson / CT Mirror

While the latest statistics from around Connecticut offer “slight glimmers of hope” that the coronavirus pandemic may be easing, Gov. Ned Lamont warned Thursday that schools and most small businesses must remain closed for at least another month to prevent any resurgence of the deadly virus.

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