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Joe Amon / Connecticut Public Radio


Back in August, families with children in Hartford Public Schools responded to an online survey aimed at finding out the reasons behind their decision to send their kids back to school.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Traditional high school football won’t be played in Connecticut this fall. The Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference -- the governing body of state high school sports -- said the final decision follows a Department of Public Health recommendation to abandon full-contact, 11-on-11 football during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Some of the computers Bridgeport Public Schools received this summer to help students still learning at home.
LINDA CONNER LAMBECK / HEARST CT MEDIA

With most school districts in Connecticut requiring that students learn online at least part of the time, the Lamont administration announced Tuesday that 20,000 of the 81,000 students who need a laptop for classes will receive one in the next few weeks.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

To play or not to play full-contact high school football? That has been the question in Connecticut for weeks. The state Department of Public Health says no. Coaches like House Speaker Joe Aresimowicz (D) say yes. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

As in-person learning continues throughout Connecticut, at least eight schools have closed their doors temporarily or imposed restrictions after confirmed cases of COVID-19. 

CIAC Executive Director Glenn Lungarini is surrounded by students during an interview as hundreds of high school student-athletes, parents and coaches protested outside the offices of the Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Though the state Department of Public Health has not reversed its decision that effectively banned high school football this fall, CIAC director Glenn Lungarini said he was pleased with how Friday’s three-hour discussion with officials went. 

Cheryl Holt / Pixabay

It has been over seven years since Sheryl Sandberg’s breakthrough book Lean In'' hit the shelfs and started a conversation about women leading in the workplace. But sexism is far from obsolete in today’s job market. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Three Connecticut schools have been temporarily closed and staff members in several others have been sent home to quarantine following positive tests for the new coronavirus just days into the start of a new academic year.

Dan Foy (Flickr Creative Commons)

Hartford Public Schools canceled the first day of both in-person and online classes after hackers hit its computer systems with a ransomware attack. Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin says there’s no evidence the hackers actually demanded any ransom. 

Brenda Leon / Connecticut Public

Tuesday’s planned opening of Hartford Public Schools was postponed after officials reported that a ransomware virus caused an outage of critical computer systems. The district announced on its website that school for both online and in-person learning will begin Wednesday, Sept. 9. 

Westhill High School volleyball team practices outside for fall season
Ali Warshavsky / WNPR

The CIAC decided to cancel full-contact high school football for the season, but other high school coaches in Connecticut are holding out hope that their student-athletes will get to play this fall amid the coronavirus pandemic.

CPTV Sports

School is back in session across the state and, for now, so is fall sports. Workouts are underway in preparation for a shortened, modified schedule. Full practices commence September 21. 

Courtesy: Waterbury Public Schools

The Office of the Child Advocate is raising alarm at the number of calls made from Waterbury public schools to police to handle behavioral issues with students ages 4 to 12. Almost 200 calls were made over a six-month period, resulting in close to 40 arrests. 

With Limited Mental Health Staff, Waterbury Calls Police On School Children Under 12

Sep 1, 2020
Frankie Graziano / WNPR

Maria was having a hard time calming down at her elementary school in Waterbury. On a December day just before holiday break in 2018, she was hitting and kicking staff and knocking books off the bookcase. She had recently entered foster care, and this was her third behavioral episode in three weeks.

So the school staff called 9-1-1, telling the dispatcher there was a “four-year-old female out of control.”

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

At CREC’s Academy of Science and Innovation in New Britain, school principal Karen Mooney has been preparing for the return of 457 students to in-person learning on Sept. 9. 

But the logistics will look a little different from those of past school years in this time of coronavirus.

Neena Satija

Each year millions of students take in-person standardized tests like the SAT and ACT as part of their application process for college. But amid the pandemic, concerns over health and safety have closed hundreds of test sites nationwide. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

After a protracted back-and-forth with state health officials, Connecticut’s governing body of high school sports will go ahead with a fall season.

Pixnio

The first day of school is just around the corner for many Connecticut students, but “back to school” will look very different for families across Connecticut. 

This hour, we hear from from students, parents and educational leaders.

Courtesy: Wilton Public Schools

The Wilton Board of Education has voted to postpone the start of in-person learning for a week, saying the town needs more time to prepare. Hamden has also pushed back the start of school for a week, citing a shortage of teachers.

Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

Central Connecticut State University students returned to learning Wednesday, with a list of pandemic requirements that include wearing masks in the classroom and taking multiple coronavirus tests this semester.

Gov. Ned Lamont joined Mark Ojakian, president of the Connecticut State Colleges & Universities system, on campus to kick off what they both said will be a different year of learning and having to adapt. Lamont stressed that if the public health metrics change, the system will adjust to remote learning. 

File Photo, July 30, 2020: Mirtha N. Aldave, a Hartford HS bilingual teacher showing support as the Connecticut Education Association (CEA) and AFT Connecticut organized a car caravan past the Governor's Residence.
Joe Amon / New England News Collaborative

Parents and relatives got to see what life will look like for socially distanced students at Bridgeport’s Central High School Monday. Superintendent Michael Testani led a group through sparsely furnished classrooms and into a cafeteria marked with caution tape. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

A viral video of UConn students at a recent campus dorm party brought a swift rebuke from the university. But both the party itself and the school’s official response are raising more questions about whether students should be back at school.

IowaPolitics.com / Flickr

Some Connecticut school districts across the state are getting ready to reopen their doors, but with coronavirus cases rising across the country, more parents are considering keeping children at home, 

Jessica Hill / AP Photo

The return to college campuses this year is fraught with angst like never before because of the pandemic. Already UConn has had to eject students from university housing because of an illicit, dorm-room party. Several students returning to campus have tested positive as part of the check-in process, and have been quarantined. The university also announced Wednesday that two faculty members have COVID-19.

Brenda Leon / Connecticut Public Radio

Chants, speeches and a public art installation took over the state Capitol building Wednesday as educators, parents and students called on the state to delay in-person instruction for the coming school year.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

The pandemic is raising questions about what’s best for children as they head into a new school year, as many schools continue to finalize plans for this fall and parents make individual decisions for their families.

Megan Goslin, a clinical psychologist and research scientist at Yale’s Child Study Center, said it’s a difficult time for everyone. 

Joshua Moses (7) holds his backpack in front of Bellizzi Middle School.
Brenda Leon / Connecticut Public

Marlin Johnson is getting her 7-year-old son Joshua ready to go back to school -- a mix of remote and in-person learning to start. Part of that preparation takes the pandemic into account, like reminding him to remember to keep his mask on and to maintain a healthy distance. 

face mask
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

As office buildings and schools reopen, some adults 65 and older are forced to return to a work environment that carries a higher risk of exposure to COVID-19.

Gary Phelan, who practices employment law in Westport as part of Mitchell & Sheahan, P.C., said he’s seeing older teachers having to make tough choices: lose their jobs or return to a potentially risky classroom environment.   

Bonnie-Brown / Creative Commons

When Jennifer Perez Caraballo decided to keep her 4-year-old child at home for the school year, she had a lot to think about, with two parents at home working full time, her own preexisting health conditions, and back-to-school plans from Hartford public schools that seemed unclear. 

Health Care And Education Suffer When There's No Internet Access

Aug 16, 2020
Melanie Stengel / C-HIT

With no Wi-Fi or reliable internet access during the COVID-19 pandemic, Susana Encarnacion of New London had some trouble during doctors’ appointments for her 9-year-old son, Jeremiah, who has asthma and attention deficit disorder.

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