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Joe Amon/Connecticut Public/NENC

The coronavirus pandemic has closed schools across the U.S., affecting nearly 2 million public school students in New England alone. What are the educational and social impacts of this sudden shift to remote learning? What about students with special learning needs? And how might the COVID-19 crisis widen the inequities in our K-12 educational system?

 Yale University
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Universities across the state that have shifted their semesters completely online due to the coronavirus pandemic are working to figure out whether they’ll provide refunds to students who’ve paid for expenses like on-campus housing and meal plans. 

school closing coronavirus
Joe Amon/Connecticut Public/NENC

COVID-19 school closures mean uncertainty for students who usually rely on the lunch period for a guaranteed meal.

Carmen Baskauf / Connecticut Public Radio

It’s tax season. Filing taxes can be a complicated and intimidating process. And ProPublica has found that big names in e-filing, like TurboTax, are actually making it more difficult for Americans to file easily and free of charge. This hour, we talk with a reporter behind the investigation, and find out whether you can file your taxes for free.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Amid pushback from Republicans and thousands of outraged parents, the legislature’s Public Health Committee voted Monday to advance a bill that would ban religious exemptions to mandatory immunizations in Connecticut.

Terry Miller, center, running in a preliminary girls 55M dash race in New Haven, Saturday February 21, 2020
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Two runners mentioned in a lawsuit over the participation of transgender athletes in Connecticut high school sports raced against each other Saturday at a state track championship in New Haven. 

Third-graders work on a math program in the library at Sanchez Elementary School in Hartford.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

A new report says the majority of U.S. parents want schools that are racially and economically integrated. But in districts where parents have school choice, schools tend to become more segregated.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Hundreds of people packed into the Legislative Office Building in Hartford Wednesday ahead of a public hearing on a bill that would change the state’s childhood vaccinations laws.

Connecticut children can attend public school by either complying with required vaccinations or by obtaining an exemption from vaccination based on religious or medical reasons. A proposed bill would eliminate the religious exemption. 

FILE - In this Feb. 7, 2019, file photo, Bloomfield High transgender athlete Terry Miller (second from left) wins the final of the 55-meter dash over transgender athlete Andraya Yearwood (far left) and others in the Connecticut girls Class S indoor meet.
AP Photo/Pat Eaton-Robb

The families of female athletes from three Connecticut schools are suing the state’s governing body of high school sports in order to stop transgender athletes from competing against the girls.

The Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference is targeted in the lawsuit over the success of two track champions from Bloomfield and Cromwell high schools.

Ryan Pascal, a 17-year-old student at Palos Verdes High School near Los Angeles, says when her school holds active shooter drills, it's "chaos." The first time it happened, not long after the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., in 2018, rumors started flying over Snapchat and text that the school was really under attack.

"We had some students trying to stack up desks to blockade the door. We had some students sort of joking around because they weren't sure how to handle this. There are other students who are very, very afraid."

Simsbury High School is using the school’s musical production as a way to talk to students about issues of race and discrimination.

The musical Hairspray is set in 1962 Baltimore.

Teenager Tracy Turnblad has secured a spot on the Corny Collins Show, a local TV dance show. The dancers on the show are white, but once a month the show has “Negro Day.” Tracy, who is white, campaigns to make the show integrated.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Sheff v. O’Neill, the landmark desegregation case in Connecticut, has shaped school systems in the greater Hartford region for decades. The state of Connecticut has announced it reached a settlement with the plaintiffs. This hour, we hear more from CT Mirror education reporter Jacqueline Rabe Thomas.

Gillian Flaccus / AP

At 6:30 a.m. in January on a residential street in West Hartford, it was 18 degrees outside and quiet. Most houses disappeared into the pitch-black darkness, making the lights coming from inside Anna Shusterman’s home especially bright.

“Hey, Max!” Shusterman yelled up the stairs from the kitchen.

WFSB

The body of a University of Connecticut student has been recovered by campus police.

Measles, mumps and rubella vaccines are seen at the Rockland County Health Department in Pomona, N.Y., Wednesday, March 27, 2019.
Seth Wenig / Associated Press

Lawmakers are wasting no time seeking public input on a proposal to erase Connecticut’s religious exemption from mandatory vaccinations.

They have scheduled a public hearing on the plan for Feb. 19 – just two weeks into the legislative session. A draft of the bill is expected to be released next week.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut’s Department of Education said it’s ready to help school districts take in Puerto Rican students evacuated from the island because of recent earthquakes.

Pixabay.com

More than 4 million people, around 1 out of 5 undergrads, are raising children today. That’s according to the U.S. Department of Education. These student parents tend to have higher GPAs than traditional students. They’re often older, single, and women of color. But more than half of them leave school without getting a degree. 

Connecticut Settles School Desegregation Case

Jan 10, 2020
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

State officials agreed Friday to enroll more than 1,000 new students in magnet schools as part of a milestone agreement in the decades-long Sheff vs. O’Neill school desegregation case. The agreement dedicates 600 of those seats to the more than 12,000 children who attend struggling, segregated schools in Hartford.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Killingly High School sports teams will once again be known as “Redmen” despite a long battle to ditch the name that’s offensive to Native Americans.

Russ / Creative Commons

Mental health professionals on college campuses say more students year over year are seeking services for new and ongoing mental health and substance use issues. They say it’s not a bad thing that students are being proactive about their mental health -- but resources are strained. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference has named Maloney High School junior Haley Lespier its winner of the 2019 Michael H. Savage Spirit of Sport Award.

Bill Smith / Flickr

Literacy. It's something many of us take for granted. The ability to read health forms, headlines, or the latest bestsellers. Yet, across the U.S., there are millions of adults who have difficulty reading.

This hour, we find out why. We talk with literacy experts and advocates, and we also hear from you.

Later in the hour, we hear about controversy in Killingly, Connecticut over a school mascot that Native Americans groups in Connecticut say is offensive. Connecticut Public’s Frankie Graziano will join us for more.

UConn Announces One Major Gift, And Another To Come

Dec 12, 2019
Jimmy Emerson / Creative Commons

The UConn Foundation announced Thursday that it has received $3 million from an anonymous donor to establish two endowed chairs for scientists in ecology and evolutionary biology.

The gift means the university will be able to recruit and retain two of the “best scientists in the field,” according to a statement from the foundation, which is the university’s fundraising arm.

Wokandapix / Pixabay

As college students wrap up their fall semester, there is an expectation their professors are tenured. But three out of four faculty today aren’t eligible for tenure. And many are adjuncts, part-time faculty without strong benefits or job security.

What’s the human cost to this model of education? We find out and we want to hear from you.

vxla/Flickr

There are some things we claim to know about Thanksgiving and the arrival of the Pilgrims that are correct: the white settlers and Native Americans really did get together, have a feast and play games. But there are many facts we get completely wrong. For one, the Pilgrims were not called Pilgrims when they arrived. And sociologist James Loewen, author of “Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong,” says they were not coming to the Americas for religious freedom.

Sean Flynn / UConn Photo

The University of Connecticut has its first Rhodes scholar.

Wanjiku Gatheru, an environmental studies major from Pomfret, is one of 32 people who will study free of charge at England’s Oxford University for at least two years.

Students Storm Field At Halftime Of Harvard-Yale Football Game To Protest Climate Change

Nov 24, 2019
Courtesy of Fossil Fuel Divest Harvard

Protesters wearing the colors of both Harvard and Yale staged a sit-in at midfield of Yale Bowl during halftime of the 136th edition of the annual football rivalry known as The Game. Most left after about an hour when they were escorted off by police; a handful who remained were told by police they were under arrest.

Ryan Martins / Connecticut Public Radio

Wednesday was a big day in the world of politics. The fifth Democratic debate took place in Atlanta, with 10 presidential hopefuls tackling policies and stating their case as to why they deserve America’s votes. That same day, U.S. Ambassador Gordon Sondland dropped bombshell testimony during the President Donald Trump impeachment inquiry hearings.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

About 800,000 young undocumented immigrants have benefited from the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, since its inception in 2012, but now many of them are living and going to school in the U.S. with their status in doubt.

Environmental Protection Agency

Classrooms across the state are becoming serious health hazards for teachers and students alike. That’s according to a report released this week by the Connecticut Education Association.

In the survey, teachers in 334 Connecticut schools reported dilapidated classroom conditions that they say are causing respiratory ailments, sinus issues, and in some cases vomiting.

Over 100 schools districts were represented in the report, including Bridgeport, Naugatuck and Orange.

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