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Shifting back and forth between in-person and remote learning has been tough, according to Alisha Price. She teaches social studies and literacy at Hallen School in Bridgeport.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

Kristen Record, a physics teacher at Bunnell High School in Stratford, says a lot of her students are bailing on school.

Students get off a bus on the first day of school in Connecticut. The first few days will be about setting expectations for mask wearing and social distancing according to superindendents.
Ali Oshinskie / Connecticut Public Radio

The academic year is well on it’s way. How are students and teachers in Connecticut adapting to their second semester of online learning? 

This hour, Connecticut Department of Education Commissioner Miguel A. Cardona joins us to answer our questions and yours on the state of Connecticut’s schools. 

Cheryl Holt / Pixabay

It has been over seven years since Sheryl Sandberg’s breakthrough book Lean In'' hit the shelfs and started a conversation about women leading in the workplace. But sexism is far from obsolete in today’s job market. 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public

State education officials say their information shows that local students aren’t catching COVID-19 in schools; that’s part of their plea to parents to allow their kids to return to the classroom amid the pandemic.

Governor Takes A Bow For Students Logging On. Data Doesn’t Back It Up

Oct 8, 2020
Gov. Lamont during a visit to New Britain High School. Students listen to him both in-person (foreground) and online (on the screen overhead).
Jacqueline Rabe Thomas / CTMirror.org

One month into the school year, Gov. Ned Lamont says online education during the pandemic is a success, noting that students are showing up for their virtual classes.

Elodie Reed / Vermont Public Radio

What we don’t learn in school can matter as much as the lessons we do learn. In this fourth and final episode of a special radio series on “Racism In New England,” we talk to teachers and students about the harm of omitting stories and cultures from curricula — and how we can do better.

Three Rivers Community College in Norwich
Jacqueline Rabe Thomas / CTMirror.org

The Connecticut State Colleges and Universities are in “budget crisis” and in need of a $69 million bailout, CSCU President Mark Ojakian told the governor Monday.

UConn Asks For $104 Million Bailout; Considering Layoffs, Hospital Borrows $45 Million

Sep 30, 2020
Denise Rickevicius, from Watertown, carries her daughter’s belongings as she moves into a UConn dormitory last month. The number of on-campus students has been sharply limited this year and has brought a loss of revenue.
YEHYUN KIM / CTMirror.org

Officials at the University of Connecticut and its health center on Wednesday asked the state for a $104.4 million bailout and warned they may need significantly more if the coronavirus shuts down the campus and hospital again.

Brenda Leon / Connecticut Public Radio

After an uptick in positive COVID-19 cases, Hartford Public Schools announced they will provide coronavirus testing for students and staff. School nurses have been trained to administer the tests to symptomatic students and will work in partnership with Hartford HealthCare and Trinity Health of New England. 

Courtesy: Darien Public Schools

Before what ended up being a 4 1/2-hour meeting Wednesday night, Darien teachers rallied outside the Board of Education building, urging the district to reconsider a proposal to bring all students back to full-time in-person learning on Tuesday.

Tomwsulcer / Wikimedia Commons

Amid a lot of talk about whether K-12 kids should go back to the classroom is the disturbing truth that it increasingly seems as if there aren’t enough teachers to lead their classes. 

Pixabay

This hour, it’s our Fall Pandemic Book Club - Connecticut Only Edition! The Connecticut Center for the Book joins us to discuss this year’s Connecticut Book Awards Finalists, and some of those finalists join us for the hour.

Coming up, our guests will tell us what they are reading, and what inspired their work. 

School buses
Yehyun Kim / CTMirror.org

 

More than a dozen schools in Connecticut have gone remote in recent days as COVID-19 outbreaks flared up. Public health officials and school administrators spent the summer trying to craft plans that would avoid shutdowns and keep students in school as long as possible. Other schools seem set on staying open even if their plans don’t end up working out. 

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public Radio


Back in August, families with children in Hartford Public Schools responded to an online survey aimed at finding out the reasons behind their decision to send their kids back to school.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Traditional high school football won’t be played in Connecticut this fall. The Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference -- the governing body of state high school sports -- said the final decision follows a Department of Public Health recommendation to abandon full-contact, 11-on-11 football during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Some of the computers Bridgeport Public Schools received this summer to help students still learning at home.
LINDA CONNER LAMBECK / HEARST CT MEDIA

With most school districts in Connecticut requiring that students learn online at least part of the time, the Lamont administration announced Tuesday that 20,000 of the 81,000 students who need a laptop for classes will receive one in the next few weeks.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

To play or not to play full-contact high school football? That has been the question in Connecticut for weeks. The state Department of Public Health says no. Coaches like House Speaker Joe Aresimowicz (D) say yes. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

As in-person learning continues throughout Connecticut, at least eight schools have closed their doors temporarily or imposed restrictions after confirmed cases of COVID-19. 

CIAC Executive Director Glenn Lungarini is surrounded by students during an interview as hundreds of high school student-athletes, parents and coaches protested outside the offices of the Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Though the state Department of Public Health has not reversed its decision that effectively banned high school football this fall, CIAC director Glenn Lungarini said he was pleased with how Friday’s three-hour discussion with officials went. 

Cheryl Holt / Pixabay

It has been over seven years since Sheryl Sandberg’s breakthrough book Lean In'' hit the shelfs and started a conversation about women leading in the workplace. But sexism is far from obsolete in today’s job market. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Three Connecticut schools have been temporarily closed and staff members in several others have been sent home to quarantine following positive tests for the new coronavirus just days into the start of a new academic year.

Dan Foy (Flickr Creative Commons)

Hartford Public Schools canceled the first day of both in-person and online classes after hackers hit its computer systems with a ransomware attack. Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin says there’s no evidence the hackers actually demanded any ransom. 

Brenda Leon / Connecticut Public

Tuesday’s planned opening of Hartford Public Schools was postponed after officials reported that a ransomware virus caused an outage of critical computer systems. The district announced on its website that school for both online and in-person learning will begin Wednesday, Sept. 9. 

Westhill High School volleyball team practices outside for fall season
Ali Warshavsky / WNPR

The CIAC decided to cancel full-contact high school football for the season, but other high school coaches in Connecticut are holding out hope that their student-athletes will get to play this fall amid the coronavirus pandemic.

CPTV Sports

School is back in session across the state and, for now, so is fall sports. Workouts are underway in preparation for a shortened, modified schedule. Full practices commence September 21. 

Courtesy: Waterbury Public Schools

The Office of the Child Advocate is raising alarm at the number of calls made from Waterbury public schools to police to handle behavioral issues with students ages 4 to 12. Almost 200 calls were made over a six-month period, resulting in close to 40 arrests. 

With Limited Mental Health Staff, Waterbury Calls Police On School Children Under 12

Sep 1, 2020
Frankie Graziano / WNPR

Maria was having a hard time calming down at her elementary school in Waterbury. On a December day just before holiday break in 2018, she was hitting and kicking staff and knocking books off the bookcase. She had recently entered foster care, and this was her third behavioral episode in three weeks.

So the school staff called 9-1-1, telling the dispatcher there was a “four-year-old female out of control.”

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

At CREC’s Academy of Science and Innovation in New Britain, school principal Karen Mooney has been preparing for the return of 457 students to in-person learning on Sept. 9. 

But the logistics will look a little different from those of past school years in this time of coronavirus.

Neena Satija

Each year millions of students take in-person standardized tests like the SAT and ACT as part of their application process for college. But amid the pandemic, concerns over health and safety have closed hundreds of test sites nationwide. 

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