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UConn Announces One Major Gift, And Another To Come

Dec 12, 2019
Jimmy Emerson / Creative Commons

The UConn Foundation announced Thursday that it has received $3 million from an anonymous donor to establish two endowed chairs for scientists in ecology and evolutionary biology.

The gift means the university will be able to recruit and retain two of the “best scientists in the field,” according to a statement from the foundation, which is the university’s fundraising arm.

Wokandapix / Pixabay

As college students wrap up their fall semester, there is an expectation their professors are tenured. But three out of four faculty today aren’t eligible for tenure. And many are adjuncts, part-time faculty without strong benefits or job security.

What’s the human cost to this model of education? We find out and we want to hear from you.

vxla/Flickr

There are some things we claim to know about Thanksgiving and the arrival of the Pilgrims that are correct: the white settlers and Native Americans really did get together, have a feast and play games. But there are many facts we get completely wrong. For one, the Pilgrims were not called Pilgrims when they arrived. And sociologist James Loewen, author of “Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong,” says they were not coming to the Americas for religious freedom.

Sean Flynn / UConn Photo

The University of Connecticut has its first Rhodes scholar.

Wanjiku Gatheru, an environmental studies major from Pomfret, is one of 32 people who will study free of charge at England’s Oxford University for at least two years.

Students Storm Field At Halftime Of Harvard-Yale Football Game To Protest Climate Change

Nov 24, 2019
Courtesy of Fossil Fuel Divest Harvard

Protesters wearing the colors of both Harvard and Yale staged a sit-in at midfield of Yale Bowl during halftime of the 136th edition of the annual football rivalry known as The Game. Most left after about an hour when they were escorted off by police; a handful who remained were told by police they were under arrest.

Ryan Martins / Connecticut Public Radio

Wednesday was a big day in the world of politics. The fifth Democratic debate took place in Atlanta, with 10 presidential hopefuls tackling policies and stating their case as to why they deserve America’s votes. That same day, U.S. Ambassador Gordon Sondland dropped bombshell testimony during the President Donald Trump impeachment inquiry hearings.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

About 800,000 young undocumented immigrants have benefited from the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, since its inception in 2012, but now many of them are living and going to school in the U.S. with their status in doubt.

Environmental Protection Agency

Classrooms across the state are becoming serious health hazards for teachers and students alike. That’s according to a report released this week by the Connecticut Education Association.

In the survey, teachers in 334 Connecticut schools reported dilapidated classroom conditions that they say are causing respiratory ailments, sinus issues, and in some cases vomiting.

Over 100 schools districts were represented in the report, including Bridgeport, Naugatuck and Orange.

Can We Get Some Volunteers?

Nov 7, 2019
rawpixel.com / Pexels

Whether through religious groups or school-organized activities, Americans have long sought ways to give back to their communities. But has this spirit of altruism faded in recent years?

This hour, we check on the state of volunteering in the U.S. and ask what is being done to motivate more Americans to do good in their spare time. Do you remember the last time you volunteered? We want to hear from you. 

After 22 Years, Educating Incarcerated Youth Still A Challenge

Nov 4, 2019
CT Mirror

In 1993, a lawyer at the Center for Children’s Advocacy brought a lawsuit challenging, among other things, the conditions of confinement at the state’s  juvenile detention centers. Four years later, the court approved an agreement that resulted in the Emily J. Consent Decree, part of which required the state to retool its educational services for juvenile detainees.

Want To Read Ned Lamont’s Playbook? Start Here.

Oct 29, 2019
Courtesy: Governor's Office

Gov. Ned Lamont engaged in two of his favorite pastimes Tuesday: Drawing boldface corporate CEOs, academics and philanthropists into public-private partnerships, and tilting at the silos he believes prevent government agencies from working efficiently in common cause.

StanfordEdTech / Creative Commons

The state announced Friday nearly $26 million in federal funds will go toward higher education readiness programs for low-income students. That money will be dispersed over the next seven years to support tutoring, mentoring, and college scholarships.

Pan American Health Organization / Creative Commons

The state is expected to release new school-by-school vaccination and exemption data Monday after a Hartford Superior Court judge denied a Bristol couple’s attempt to temporarily block the release.

Attorney Cara Pavalock-D’Amato argued in court on behalf of her clients Brian and Kristen Festa that the release of a second report detailing percentages of religious and medical vaccine exemptions at each Connecticut school would continue to cause “irreparable harm” to the Festas, who have a son with a religious exemption.

Adam Hushin / Connecticut Public Radio

Transparency related to a board tasked with overseeing a partnership between the state, a billionaire hedge-fund manager, and his wife is still an issue for lawmakers, even as that board gets together for the first time.

Courtesy: NEAG School of Education, UConn

At 27, he was a Connecticut school principal. At 44, he is the state’s commissioner of education.

This hour, Dr. Miguel Cardona joins us to talk about his vision for Connecticut's education future. 

Milestone C Stem / YouTube

The superintendent of schools in Shelton is speaking out days after a white student in the district spit on a black patron at a Washington, D.C. museum.

John Brighenti / Flickr

A Connecticut town is dealing with another incident in which a student in the district is being accused of committing an alleged racist act.

Ng Han Guan / Associated Press

The Partnership for Connecticut has invited the public to the first “organizational meeting” of its governing board on October 18, but it’s unclear what portion of that meeting – or subsequent meetings – will be open, or what the board will be discussing. 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

The University of Connecticut has a new leader. This hour, we sit down with UConn’s new president, Thomas Katsouleas, who stepped into the role this August.

Katsouleas is trained as a physicist and electrical engineer whose career has focused on plasma science. We hear about his path to Connecticut and ask him about his vision for Connecticut's flagship state university.

'Where We Live' On Higher Education

Sep 20, 2019
By Amherst2005 (www.creativecommons.org)

Where We Live recently launched a series of conversations about higher education. We discuss everything from tuition to tenure and talk with leaders from the state's colleges and universities. Listen to recent episodes below and make sure to check back for more. 

Wokandapix / Pixabay

As college students settle into the fall semester, there is an expectation their professors are tenured. But three out of four faculty today aren’t eligible for tenure. And many are adjuncts, part-time faculty without strong benefits or job security.

What’s the human cost to this model of education? We find out and we want to hear from you.

Can We Get Some Volunteers?

Sep 17, 2019
rawpixel.com / Pexels

Whether through religious groups or school-organized activities, Americans have long sought ways to give back to their communities. But has this spirit of altruism faded in recent years?

This hour, we check on the state of volunteering in the U.S. and ask what is being done to motivate more Americans to do good in their spare time. Do you remember the last time you volunteered? We want to hear from you. 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

For more than 30 years, Quinnipiac University was led by John Lahey. Now, the private university in Hamden, Connecticut has a new leader and its first female president. This hour, we sit down with President Judy Olian.

Olian comes to the university from UCLA, where she was Dean of the business school.

We find out what is her vision for Quinnipiac University, and ask: In an age of ever-changing technology, how is the school preparing its students successfully for the workforce of the future?

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Governor Lamont is back from his Maine vacation and seemingly rarin’ to go. In just the last week or so, he overruled his health commissioner and will release school-by-school data on vaccinations, rolled out a big transportation plan, and committed to a no-carbon electric grid by 2040. 

Government of Prince Edward Island / Creative Commons

Fewer Connecticut kindergarteners are getting vaccinated for measles, mumps and rubella, and more students are getting religious exemptions for mandatory vaccines, new data shows.

Lamont Names Financier Dan Toscano As UConn Chairman

Aug 29, 2019
Ariel Dowski / UConn

Dan Toscano, a Darien financier and longtime financial supporter of the University of Connecticut, has been chosen by Gov. Ned Lamont as the new chairman of the UConn Board of Trustees.

Toscano, who graduated from UConn in 1987 and currently has a son enrolled there, is the former head of the UConn Foundation Board of Directors and has been a long time donor to the university. 

Measles, mumps and rubella vaccines are seen at the Rockland County Health Department in Pomona, N.Y., Wednesday, March 27, 2019.
Seth Wenig / Associated Press

Governor Ned Lamont is pushing back on his own Department of Public Health’s recent decision to withhold further data on school vaccination rates. 

Rhoda Baer/National Cancer Institute / Creative Commons

Renee Coleman-Mitchell, Connecticut’s public health commissioner, said Tuesday that she has no plans to release the most recent round of statewide school-by-school immunization data, despite calls this week from lawmakers who say parents should have access to the information as the school year begins. 

Matthew Lotz / U.S. Air Force

Researchers at UMass Amherst say it's unclear whether requiring vaccines in schools directly increases the number of children who get them.

Kathleen Megan / CT Mirror

Miguel Cardona, the state’s new education chief, charged the state’s superintendents to challenge “the normalization of failure” to ensure that all students have a chance to succeed. 

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