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Climate scientists agree that this century is getting much warmer and that such warming will likely bring economic pain to the U.S., but economists aren't sure how much. Now, a team of scientists and economists, writing in the upcoming issue of the journal Science, says it can at least tell which parts of the country are likely to suffer the most.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Though Aetna has said it plans to move the company headquarters away from Hartford as a way to broaden access to innovation and new talent, some economists remain puzzled over the company’s strategy.

Paris Air Show

Fourteen small Connecticut aerospace companies are exhibiting their wares at the Paris Air Show this week. They join thousands of other businesses at the world’s biggest industry showcase. 

Health and Wellbeing / Creative Commons

Nobel prize-winning economist Robert Shiller says Connecticut shouldn’t be cutting taxes in order to keep corporations in the state. 

Updated at 11:46 a.m. ET

The U.S. economy added 138,000 jobs in May, according to the monthly jobs report released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics on Friday morning.

The national unemployment rate nudged lower, to 4.3 percent from 4.4 percent — a 16-year low. The 4.4 percent level had been the lowest since since 2007, before the recession hit.

Sage Ross / Creative Commons

Economic development officials must grapple in coming months with the implications, should one of the state’s most iconic companies decide to move its headquarters out of Connecticut. 

Onasill - Bill Badzo / Creative Commons

Health insurer Aetna has confirmed that it is in talks to move its headquarters out of Connecticut. But the company said it has no final destination yet. Nor has it said definitively what might happen to the thousands of employees currently based in the state. 

Dru Bloomfield / Creative Commons

More young adults live in their parents’ homes today than in 1940. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, roughly 34 percent of the nation’s millennials live in their childhood bedrooms or their parent’s basements. 

Reyner Media / Creative Commons

We spend over three trillion dollars on health care every year and we have worse outcomes than any other developed country - all of which spend on average about half of what America spends per person. 

Harriet Jones / WNPR

Connecticut lost jobs in April, according to the latest report from the state Department of Labor. And the state’s unemployment rate ticked upward 0.1 percent to 4.9 percent. The state shed 1,500 jobs in the month.

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There has been a surge of interest in the writings of Ayn Rand in the last decade, including from Republican Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, President Donald Trump and several members of his cabinet.

Leo Leung / Creative Commons

A Milford-based entrepreneur is launching a training course designed to help with a shortage of web and mobile software developers -- an issue that’s only expected to get worse in coming years. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Battling lawmakers, a multi-billion dollar deficit, and the end of a gubernatorial era. April was -- without doubt -- an eventful month for state politics. 

This hour, we hear from the man at the helm of it all: Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy. With less than two years left to go, how does he plan to round off his second -- and final -- term in office? We find out and also we also hear from you.

Jim Bowen / Creative Commons

State lawmakers are up against deadlines this week to settle on a budget plan — one that tackles a nearly two billion dollar deficit next year. But so far all we’ve seen is a logjam in Hartford.

This hour, we find out what gridlock at the capitol could mean for the state’s future.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut U.S. Marine Michael Zacchea had a job to do in 2004: train and lead the first Iraqi Army battalion after the U.S. disbanded the country’s military post invasion.

This hour, we revisit our conversation with Zacchea, and co-author Ted Kemp about their book The Ragged Edge which details the challenges Zacchea faced leading a diverse group of Iraqis. 

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin will present his budget to the City Council Monday, and he's projecting a $50 million hole. But he said a lack of clarity about the state budget is making the city's job harder. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The mayor who wanted it is gone. The developer who built it is gone. And the plans to build around it are on hold. But finally, after a year of delay, Hartford’s new minor league baseball stadium is about to have its first minor league game. 

The first round of the French elections takes place April 23, a vote that’s expected to be momentous for Europe. It might seem a long way away, but the outcome might also be very important to Connecticut. 

Dru Bloomfield / Creative Commons

More young adults live in their parents’ homes today than in 1940. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, roughly 34 percent of the nation’s millennials live in their childhood bedrooms or their parent’s basements. 

The White House is celebrating some encouraging numbers this week. Factory jobs are up. Illegal border crossings are down.

The new administration is claiming credit on both fronts, although much of the change so far is psychological.

Cliff / Creative Commons

East Windsor is one step closer to having a casino after the Mashantucket Pequot and Mohegan tribes selected the town as the site of a possible third gaming facility in Connecticut.

This hour, we ask, how will this plan transform East Windsor and the region? 

Jackie Harris / WNPR

State lawmakers held a public hearing Thursday on a series of bills to benefit workers in Connecticut. One effort would increase the minimum wage to $15.00 an hour by 2022, while another would mandate paid family leave. 

Luis Pérez / Creative Commons

From self-service menus to self-driving cars to... androids around the water cooler? This hour, we explore the past, present, and future of workforce automation. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

African Americans are a diverse group of people who live in our cities and our suburbs.

This hour, what does it mean to be black in Connecticut?

Wikimedia Commons

There has been a surge of interest in the writings of Ayn Rand in the last decade, including from Republican Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, President Donald Trump and several of his cabinet picks.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

Connecticut congresswoman Rosa DeLauro has welcomed an executive order from President Donald Trump, formally withdrawing the U.S. from the Trans Pacific Partnership. 

President-elect Donald Trump plans to hit the ground running. He could sign his first executive orders within hours of taking the oath of office.

"I've asked my transition team to develop a list of executive actions we can take on Day 1 to restore our laws and bring back our jobs," Trump said in a videotaped message in November. "It's about time."

Vice President-elect Mike Pence echoed that message in a meeting with reporters on Thursday.

"Our job is to be ready on Day 1," Pence said. "We are all ready to go to work."

The incoming president has promised to:

IBT / Flickr

To say virtual reality is finally here is inaccurate -- it's been here for decades. What is finally here is the right combination of low cost, high powered computing necessary for the technology to shine. And with the stage set for a revolution in how we interact with the digital world, businesses and investors are taking notice.

Emmanuel Huybrechts / Flickr Creative Commons

Labor pains and lessons from the north.

As Connecticut comes to terms with recent job loss, Massachusetts emerges as a regional leader in statewide job recovery. This hour, we explore the latest job market trends and find out what Connecticut stands to learn from the Bay State. 

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