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Last May, Samantha Collins’s drug use, legal problems and dealings with the Connecticut Department of Children and Families forced her to strike a bargain with the agency.

Ernesto del Aguila III, National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) / Creative Commons

Researchers in Connecticut and nationwide are having a hard time recruiting minorities for clinical trials.

This hour, we find out why and we examine the impact on our health. Does mistrust of doctors and drug companies play a part?

There’s a new tool in the fight against drug overdose deaths in Rhode Island. Publicly available boxes containing naloxone, an anti-overdose drug, have been installed in various social service agencies in Providence.

Dr. Geoff Capraro, a physician at Rhode Island Hospital, helped design the so-called NaloxBoxes, which he likens to a fire extinguisher.

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Connecticut lawmakers unanimously passed legislation that will take additional steps to address the state’s opioid crisis.

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In the 1800s, Connecticut peddlers would travel south to peddle goods made in small factories around the state. The best way to increase their profit margin was to slip a few pieces of prized nutmeg -- and a few fake wooden ones to match -- in their bag. It didn't take long to expose the fraud, earning us the nickname of the Nutmeg State, known by all as clever, if ethically challenged, people. 

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The state's efforts to control the opioid addiction crisis are getting a boost from new federal funding. Connecticut will receive a $5.5 million federal grant. 

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President Donald Trump's nominee to head the Food and Drug Administration was before Congress this week. Scott Gottlieb wants a quicker approval process for new drugs, but a new study said the FDA already works faster than its peer agency in Europe.

A man named Eddie threads through the mid-afternoon crowd in Cambridge’s Central Square. He’s headed for a sandwich shop, the first stop on a tour of public bathrooms available for drug use. Eddie, whose last name we’re not including because he uses illegal drugs, knows which restrooms on Mass. Ave. he can enter, on what terms, at what hours and for how long.

Mike Acton / Creative Commons

Twenty years ago, a lot of Icelandic teens were drinking too much. But an innovative program changed that.

This hour, we talk with the American researcher who helped combat the problem by tapping into natural highs — like sports. If the program has worked, why aren’t other countries following suit? We find out.

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State Rep. Vincent Candelora proposed legislation that would impose a six percent tax on medical marijuana.

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Stamford-based Purdue Pharma is seeking the dismissal of a lawsuit which alleges it is responsible for the opioid abuse epidemic. 

Connecticut Health I-Team

In less than eight hours last June, Yale New Haven’s emergency department treated 12 patients who had overdosed on opioids. Three died; nine were saved.

Lori Mack/WNPR

Connecticut Senators Chris Murphy and Richard Blumenthal are co-sponsors of new legislation to help combat opioid addiction. The Budgeting for Opioid Addiction Treatment Act -- known as the LifeBOAT Act -- would establish a funding stream. Murphy called it an innovative piece of legislation. 

Microscopic, bear-shaped animals called tardigrades are one of the most resilient animals on earth. Known colloquially as water bears, they can survive freezing temperatures, radiation, even a trip to outer space.

The creatures are famous for their ability to withstand extremely dry conditions. Water bears can go without water for 10 years, surviving as a dessicated shell. Just how they come back to life when their environment is friendlier has baffled scientists for years.

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