WNPR

drugs

Uma Ramiah

INTRO: As the New England Journal of Medicine celebrates its 200th anniversary, a national debate has been brewing about the close relationship between money and medicine. In the first of a 2-part series, the Connecticut Mirror’s Neena Satija examines how researchers come under fire for taking industry money, yet can’t survive without it.

Dartanyon Blake

Two years ago, we told you the story of Dartanyon Blake -- then a 37-year-old man, born and raised in Hartford, who got in trouble young and who couldn't get out. Blake passed away recently. WNPR's Jeff Cohen has this remembrance.

A forensic biologist at the University of New Haven is developing a DNA databank that will help federal authorities track where marijuana originates.  It’s aimed at assisting law enforcement with drug busts, but it could also be used to protect against bio-terrorism.

Chion Wolf

Today's show was occasioned by a controversial New York Times page one article about Dr. Donald Levin.

It said: "Like many of the nation’s 48,000 psychiatrists, Dr. Levin, in large part because of changes in how much insurance will pay, no longer provides talk therapy, the form of psychiatry popularized by Sigmund Freud that dominated the profession for decades. Instead, he prescribes medication, usually after a brief consultation with each patient."

The equinist, creative commons

Yesterday at the State Capitol, the General Assembly's Judiciary heard testimony on a number of marijuana related bills being considered by the state legislature this year, including the decriminalization of possession of small amounts of Marijuana, and the use of marijuana for medical purposes.  Joining us to talk about this is Stamford state representative Gerald Fox, the house chair of the Judiciary committee.

State Senator Proposes Bill to Decriminalize Marijuana

Feb 22, 2011
JailBreak Photography

In his state budget address, Governor Dannel Malloy proposed changes to how Connecticut deals with drug offenders.  WNPR’s Jason Cunningham reports on one of four new proposed bills that tackle marijuana reform.  

“There are too, there are simply too many people also, who have been arrested for and jailed for minor, non-violent or drug offenses.”

While Governor Malloy didn’t directly address the issue of marijuana reform in his budget proposal, he did talk about "alternative forms of punishment" for those convicted of some minor crimes.

Federal regulators have rejected a new inhaled insulin treatment from drug maker MannKind. The diabetes treatment was due to have been manufactured in Danbury. 

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