drugs | Connecticut Public Radio
WNPR

drugs

Paramedic Peter Canning walks through Hartford’s Pope Park. He picks up empty heroin baggies as he passes by athletic fields, a public pool and a picnic pavilion where a few people appear to nod off.

A health official in Springfield, Massachusetts, said she was surprised by a jump in the number of opioid overdose deaths in the city, and she doesn't know why it happened.

Genome Research Limited / Creative Commons

Gilead, the biopharmaceutical company responsible for manufacturing Truvada, has come under scrutiny for its HIV drug pricing. This hour, we get the latest on this story. We also preview an upcoming Hartford rally, scheduled to coincide with AIDS Awareness Day. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut is leading a major effort to hold generic drug manufacturers responsible for the rising cost of pharmaceuticals.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Emails sent by the former chairman of Purdue Pharma are being seen by the public as a result of a complaint filed by the state of Connecticut.

A major pharmaceutical distribution company and two of its former executives are facing criminal charges for their roles in advancing the nation's opioid crisis and profiting from it.

Matt Benoit / iStock/Thinkstock

The state's desperation for new revenue is certainly fueling this year's push to legalize marijuana.

But for many Democrats in the legislature, a larger goal is addressing racial injustices created by a crackdown on illegal drugs that has inordinately targeted non-whites.

Michael Fischer / Creative Commons

Connecticut lawmakers voted to advance three bills that would legalize the retail sale and possession of recreational marijuana Monday.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Many Connecticut lawmakers have said that if the state legalizes cannabis, it would be only right to expunge the records of state residents who have cannabis-related convictions. But that may be easier said than done.

Mark/flickr creative commons

With recreational marijuana on sale in Massachusetts, Connecticut lawmakers are looking at legalizing recreational cannabis more seriously than ever.

Randy Heinitz / Flickr

It is estimated that 12 million Americans live inside one of our nations roughly 45,000 mobile home communities. Despite these numbers, few people outside these parks truly know what life is like for their residents.

Men are dying after opioid overdoses at nearly three times the rate of women in the United States. Overdose deaths are increasing faster among black and Latino Americans than among whites. And there's an especially steep rise in the number of young adults ages 25 to 34 whose death certificates include some version of the drug fentanyl.

diego_cervo/iStock / Thinkstock

In southeastern Connecticut, a team of Recovery Navigators is offering a hand -- and a sense of hope -- to residents with opioid drug addiction. This hour, we take an in-depth look at the work this team is doing.

We also hear why some municipal leaders -- including the mayor of New London, Connecticut -- are championing legislation that would grant municipalities the right to sue big pharma over the ongoing opioid crisis.

And finally, when it comes to Medicaid insurance, why are certified nurse midwives in Connecticut reimbursed at a lower rate than OB/GYN physicians? We take a closer look with Connecticut Public Radio health care reporter Nicole Leonard, and we also hear from you. 

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

While the total number of people who died from any overdose in 2018 is slightly down from the year before, fentanyl showed up in more than 75 percent of deaths—making it more common than heroin.

Kris Notaro / Creative Commons

An estimated 20 percent of Americans reside in rural communities. What are the needs of this population? And to what extent are those needs being met? This hour, we take a closer look.

We also sit down with Anne Torsiglieri, whose one-woman show "A" Train comes to Hartford this week. 

The 2019 tax season is here. Have you filed your forms? If so, good on you for not procrastinating. If not, you might want to reconsider waiting until the last minute... because the U.S. tax code has changed.

This hour, we take an in-depth look at the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act and find out what it means for those filing taxes this year.

Later, Connecticut Public Radio’s Patrick Skahill takes us inside a UConn lecture hall, where students are learning the science of cultivating... get this... cannabis. 

Weedmaps had this message put up on I-91 in New Haven on January 23. It's a reminder to Connecticut residents that marijuana is available for purchase in Massachusetts.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A New Haven-based addiction treatment organization is going after the messaging on an interstate billboard with another billboard.

Matt Benoit / iStock/Thinkstock

Senate Democrats have unveiled their plan to legalize and tax recreational pot. Senate President Pro Tem Martin Looney said with neighboring Massachusetts already selling legal marijuana, Connecticut needs to treat cannabis like other adult products.

“What we need as we have done with alcohol, as we have done with tobacco is a scheme for legalization for those who are adults, plus regulation and taxation,” said Looney.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A methadone clinic in Norwich has been temporarily closed because of a maintenance issue, and that’s forcing more than 500 patients to seek help elsewhere. The Root Center for Advanced Recovery was shut down after contractors assessing the building for an upcoming renovation found a “significant structural integrity issue.”

 OxyContin pills are arranged for a photo at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vt.
Toby Talbot / Associated Press

This story was co-published by ProPublica with STAT.

Not content with billions of dollars in profits from the potent painkiller OxyContin, its maker explored expanding into an “attractive market” fueled by the drug’s popularity — treatment of opioid addiction, according to previously secret passages in a court document filed by the state of Massachusetts. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Chronic pain sufferers want people to know that the opioid crisis is affecting the way they manage pain.

Democratic legislative leaders in Connecticut want to legalize the recreational use of marijuana this year. They say the taxes generated from such a move would bring in as much as $100 million a year.

Sign up for the CommonHealth newsletter to receive a weekly digest of WBUR's best health, medicine and science coverage.

Frankieleon (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Nearly 9,000 children and teens have died from opioid poisonings since the epidemic began in the late 1990s, according to Yale epidemiologist Dr. Julie Gaither. An earlier Yale study found that about 30 kids a year died in hospitals, but this time her team analyzed data on deaths in all settings.

courtesty Domenic Esposito

Connecticut's Attorney General George Jepsen announced that the state is suing pharmaceutical company and opioid manufacturer Purdue Pharma, saying it mislead patients and doctors. Jepsen said the Stamford-based company downplayed the addiction risks for its prescription opioid medications.

When Maddy Nadeau was a toddler, her mother wasn't able to care for her. "I remember Mom was always locking herself in her room and she didn't take care of me. My mom just wasn't around at the time," she says.

Every day, her older sister Devon came home from elementary school and made sure Maddy had something to eat.

"Devon would come home from school and fix them cold hot dogs or a bowl of cereal — very simple items that both of them could eat," says Sarah Nadeau, who fostered the girls and later adopted them.

The opening of commercial pot shops in Massachusetts is likely to draw people from neighboring states —like Connecticut — where recreational marijuana is not legal. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

You can’t buy pot for fun in Connecticut, but provided you don’t bring it back over the border, you can now purchase at two stores in Massachusetts.

Mayor David Narkewicz of Northampton, Massachusetts, said he'll be the first to purchase cannabis legally east of the Mississippi River when his city's pot store opens. 

It's now legal for adults to smoke pot in Canada. But some Canadians have found themselves barred – possibly permanently – if they admit at the U.S. border that they have used marijuana.

Estevan, Saskatchewan, is just 10 miles north of the border with North Dakota. The town's mayor, Roy Ludwig, told the CBC that residents have been turned away at the border for admitting to marijuana use.

Pages