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For the first time, the state Department of Public Health has released to the public details about how many children at each school in the state are vaccinated.

A child died from influenza this week, becoming the first pediatric flu death in Connecticut this season.

Officials from the state Department of Public Health announced the child’s death in a statement Friday while stressing the importance of vaccinating children against influenza.

Lamont’s Health Budget vs Connecticut Hospitals

Feb 20, 2019
Gov. Ned Lamont addresses the legislature on Feburary 20, 2019.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

After watching his predecessor, Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, spar with Connecticut’s hospitals for much of the past eight years, Gov. Ned Lamont got off to a rough start with the industry himself on Wednesday.

Lamont’s new budget canceled a previously approved tax cut for hospitals, replacing it with an effective tax hike of about $43 million per year.

The governor set aggressive goals to cut state health care costs, flat-funded social services and nursing homes, and created a new asset test for a health care assistance program for seniors.

Aaron Brown / Creative Commons

A student at Central Connecticut State University is being treated for bacterial meningitis after becoming seriously ill. According to the university, the student is recovering and people who were in close contact with the student were given a course of antibiotics as a precautionary measure.

Outreach Programs Target Asthma Hot Spots, But More Help Is Needed

Nov 18, 2018
Robert Carmon, and dad, Chaz demonstrate the inhaler used twice daily to control Robert's asthma.
Steve Hamm / C-HIT.org

Robert Carmon had a rough start to life. Shortly after birth he developed asthma, a chronic disease that causes inflammation in the lungs and difficulty breathing. His attacks were so severe as an infant that his parents rushed him to the emergency room practically every week. They were terrified he might die.

Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

Some folks see chipped paint on windowsills and door frames of older Connecticut homes as rustic, New England charm. But it makes public health officials wary.

The U.S. banned lead-based paint for housing in 1978. By then, many homes in the state were already constructed.

Fried Dough / Flickr

Hartford is Connecticut’s first city to adopt an ordinance that’ll stop vendors from selling tobacco products to anyone under 21 years old.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Tatiana Melendez waited in the shade during a New England heat wave, ready to make a move.

“I got all the information for you, all right,” Melendez, 46, said as she handed a baggie of info to a passerby. “This is very good for you. For everybody doing sex.”

Despite Progress, HIV Racial Divide Persists

Jul 23, 2018
Arthur Harris Jr.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

By the time Arthur Harris Jr. turned 17, he had already endured a childhood of grinding poverty in Hartford’s North End, the death of his mother, and the rejection of a community that viewed homosexuality as a sin. It should have come as no surprise to anyone, then, that he went searching for love and acceptance wherever he could find it — a search that landed him in the arms of a man nearly twice his age and, later, in the kinds of risky situations he’d been warned about in his high school health class.

Andrew Malone / Creative Commons

The recent heat wave is set to come to an end, but temperatures are expected to stay in the low 90’s until the end of the week. Officials warned people to stay inside and keep cool in order to avoid heat related illness.

A low-temperature electron micrograph of E. coli bacteria, magnified 10,000 times.
Ericc Erbe, Christopher Pooley / Agricultural Research Service

Connecticut is one of seven states where cases of E. coli poisoning have been reported. The Centers for Disease Control is reporting 17 cases, including two in Connecticut.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service are investigating, but so far haven’t linked a specific food, grocery store, or restaurant chain as the source.

Source: United States Census Bureau, Connecticut Department of Public Health Credit: Patrick Skahill

Figures on overdose deaths grab headlines, but treatment data could save lives. In response, health officials have released new information on emergency room visits for drug overdoses, numbers that paint a fuller picture of the state's opioid crisis.

Yujin =) / flickr

From ancient mixtures of boiled goat fats and ashes to modern artisanal soaps with calendula and coffee grinds, humans have been inventing clever ways of cleaning themselves since the very beginning.

Stacey Newman/iStock / Thinkstock

As one of the worst flu seasons in recent memory continues, Middlesex Hospital has changed its visitor policies to combat spread of the virus.

Daniel Paquet / Creative Commons

Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention declared that influenza is now widespread in Connecticut.

NY State IPM Program at Cornell University / Creative Commons

The tick population in Connecticut is on the rise, and so is the threat of Lyme disease — and other tick-borne illnesses.

This hour, we hear the latest from medical professionals and policy makers about the need for new funding and research to battle a “growing tick problem” in the Northeast.

M R / Creative Commons

Nearly 1,400 new cases of lead-poisoned children under age 6 were reported in Connecticut in 2015, a slight drop from the year before, but more children showed higher levels of poisoning.

NY State IPM Program at Cornell University / Creative Commons

The tick population in Connecticut is on the rise, and so is the threat of Lyme disease — and other tick-borne illnesses.

This hour, we hear the latest from medical professionals and policy makers about the need for new funding and research to battle a “growing tick problem” in the Northeast.

Bill Would Consolidate Local Conn. Health Departments

Mar 13, 2017

The Connecticut Legislature’s Public Health Committee is considering a proposed bill that would consolidate local health departments into regional health districts.

Bart Everson / Creative Commons

Get the lead out -- at least, that's what Connecticut renters Rosie Gallant and Adam Golka hoped to do after discovering the toxin in their Woodstock home. This hour, we hear their story and find out how repeated lead exposure has impacted the health of their infant daughter. 

Lance Cheung / U.S. Department of Agriculture

State public health officials have released a list of 14 farms in Connecticut that got tainted beef from a Massachusetts slaughterhouse that is the source of an E. coli outbreak. 

NIAID / Creative Commons

Nearly 8 percent of adults and children in the United States have asthma, but new Connecticut state data shows that there has been a decrease in asthma-related hospitalizations and Emergency Room visits in many of our communities.

This hour, we learn more about asthma trends in our state and we examine measures our health providers are putting in place to curb the effects of the disease. And later, we check in on how well Connecticut is doing to prevent lead poisoning among children. 

Lori Mack / WNPR

Scientists in Connecticut believe new information could indicate the Zika virus is more of a threat than previously thought.

Dr. Theodore Andreadis, Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station in New Haven, said new findings from the University of Texas have just been published.

cjuneau / Creative Commons

Connecticut’s early settlers came to this region in part for our fertile farmland — but what is the state of farming in Connecticut today?

This hour, we explore agriculture in the Nutmeg State.

Jamiesrabbits / Creative Commons

You've probably heard of MDs, medical doctors, but what about another type of physician: NDs? Naturopathic doctors now want to be allowed prescribing rights in Connecticut.

U.S. Food and Drug Administration / Public Domain

Connecticut had the highest total number of foodborne illness outbreaks in New England from 2005 to 2014, according to federal data -- a distinction that experts say is fueled by better reporting, while higher rates of certain pathogens also may contribute.

Michael Greenberg / Creative Commons

Sepsis is always an emergency. But I bet many of you reading this don't know what it is. 

The CDC says there are over one million cases of sepsis in America annually -- many more globally -- and about 258,000 of those people die from it. It's the ninth leading cause of disease-related deaths and more people are hospitalized for sepsis every year than for heart disease and stroke combined. It's a major driver behind higher health costs.

Raining via Wikimedia Commons / Public Domain

Connecticut still ranks high among states in the use of antipsychotic drugs for elderly nursing home residents, but its rate of use has dropped 33 percent since 2011 -- a bigger decline than the national average -- new government data show.

Bart Everson / Creative Commons

Exposure to lead and lead poisoning is a bigger problem in Connecticut than previously thought, and could be a factor in the achievement gap between white and minority kids in the state. 

Connecticut public health and law enforcement departments this week are testing how the state responds to situations such as an infectious disease outbreak that require extensive coordination between local, state and federal agencies. Run by the Connecticut Department of Public Health, the exercise includes the Centers for Disease Control, hospitals and volunteers.

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