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Casino City's Indian Gaming Industry Report, which was released today, says Connecticut was in the top five states in revenue brought in by the casinos, totaling $1.85 billion.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Last year, Hartford's board of education decided against renewing the contract of Superintendent Christina Kishimoto beyond this coming June. Now, Kishimoto, a reformer who took the job after Steven Adamowski, is leaving.

The legislature’s higher education committee heard testimony on Tuesday over a bill aimed at improving sexual assault policies on Connecticut college campuses. The proposal would change how schools report sexual assaults involving both students and employees.

Evaluating Common Core

Feb 4, 2014
Chion Wolf / WNPR

After mounting complaints from teachers, officials recently announced the state plans to delay the implementation of teacher evaluations. Meanwhile, other lawmakers are calling for a re-examination of the Common Core standards. Two years after Connecticut approved sweeping education legislation, we'll check-in on the implementation and receive an update on Common Core in the state. 

editor B, creative commons

Earlier this week, The President and Co-founder of the Families and Work Institute came to Hartford this week to talk about the work she’s been doing in early childhood development.

Hartford Community Schools was chosen as one of a handful of communities nationally to take part in her “Mind in the Making” initiative - meant to share life skills and give hands-on training for parents and educators. Today, we’ll talk with Ellen Galinsky.

The U.S. Department of Education has issued new data on the cost of college in America. Three Connecticut colleges rank among  the nation’s most expensive. 

Trinity College’s tuition is  5th highest in the nation for private, not-for-profit 4-year colleges. The sticker price at Trinity is $44,070 dollars.  Connecticut College ranks 7th .  Wesleyan University comes in a close 8th. 

The data can be found on the USDE’s website called College Scorecard, which offers students and families a variety of ways to compare the cost of college.

Yale University has asked federal education officials to lower a fine imposed on the school for under-reporting sex offenses.  

The federal Clery Act spells out how colleges and universities nationwide are expected to compile and report crime data – including sex crimes on campus.  The U.S. Department of Education began reviewing Yale’s compliance with Clery back in 2004, after a Yale Alumni Magazine article raised questions about the accuracy and completeness of the school’s reports.  

Yale University has asked federal education officials to lower a fine imposed on the school for under-reporting sex offenses.  

The federal Clery Act spells out how colleges and universities nationwide are expected to compile and report crime data – including sex crimes on campus.  The U.S. Department of Education began reviewing Yale’s compliance with Clery back in 2004, after a Yale Alumni Magazine article raised questions about the accuracy and completeness of the school’s reports.  

The Connecticut Department of Education has reached a new agreement with the plaintiffs in the decades long Sheff v. O'Neill case.

The lawsuit is meant to ease the racial disparity between students in Hartford Public Schools and neighboring school districts.

The Connecticut Department of Education has reached a new agreement with the plaintiffs in the decades long Sheff v. O'Neill case.

The lawsuit is meant to ease the racial disparity between students in Hartford Public Schools and neighboring school districts.

Yale University has introduced new workshops for students aimed at reducing sexual misconduct and improving the sexual climate on campus. Many sexual misconduct and prevention programs for college students center on decision-making and consent.

But if you’re at the point where there’s a question about consent, then you already have a communication problem, says Yale student Matt Breuer. He’s a Communication and Consent educator at the university. He says Yale’s workshops begin with conversation about sexual pressure.  

Hartford Public Schools have signed an agreement with federal education authorities to improve supports and services for students who are English Language Learners.  

A complaint was filed with U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights in 2007 on behalf of Somali-Bantu, Liberian and Spanish-speaking students in the Hartford Public Schools.   

"Students did not have appropriate amounts of supports, accommodations and services so they could understand what was being asked of them."

Advocates have been saying for years, that the needs of young children get lost inside Connecticut’s larger school system. 

Governor Malloy has just proposed a new Office of Early Childhood, focused exclusively on children ages zero to five years old.

Multiple state agencies have administered Connecticut’s early childhood programs, and Lt. Governor Nancy Wyman says its been hard for parents to figure out.  

"To get through the bureaucratic mess in government was terrible. Because you’d have to go from one department to the other department."

Students in three Connecticut school districts will start having longer school days beginning next year. Governor Dannel Malloy joined U-S Education Secretary Arne Duncan and leaders from four other states to announce the initiative in Washington DC.  He says Connecticut will use a mix of state and federal funding to help pay for an additional 300 hours of school time next year.

Connecticut’s Governor has staked a lot on reforming the state’s educational system. And a large part of the motivation is to provide a workforce literate in science, technology, engineering and math – the STEM skills. But the pace of technological change is getting quicker every year, and figuring out how to train workers for the high value industries of the 21st century is ever more challenging. This week on the business report we begin a series of reports on three industries vital to Connecticut’s future, and ask whether the state is living up to its reputation for a superior workforce.

A new way to interpret Connecticut Mastery Test scores reveals a different picture of academic improvement in the state’s schools. This measure looks at whether students are growing over time.

Vertical scales match a student from year to year, say from the first year of CMT testing in third grade to fourth grade. The system compares how that student performs one year to the next despite the more advanced material.

Diane Orson

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan was in Connecticut Tuesday to announce that eight states, including Connecticut, will be granted waivers from the federal No Child Left Behind law.

Duncan’s first stop was New Haven where he met with educators, advocates and lawmakers to talk about school reform. Much of the discussion centered on New Haven’s teachers’ contract, which has been hailed as a model for the nation.

The legislative session just past made some major changes in the state of Connecticut. It abolished the death penalty, established Sunday alcohol sales, legalized medical marijuana and began a process of reform of the education system. But what was in it for the business community? WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports.

The dust is beginning to settle on the short session that finished last week, and reflection is beginning.

“From the small business perspective I think honestly there’s not much that was achieved.”

A recent report by the US Department of Education’s Office of Inspector General finds inadequate enforcement of a federal law aimed at preventing alcohol and drug abuse on college campuses.   The review was requested by two state lawmakers on behalf of a Connecticut resident.

Connecticut education officials are finalizing the state’s waiver application for relief from the federal No Child Left Behind Act. Applications for the second round of waivers are due on Tuesday.

Legislative Priorities Outside The Capitol

Feb 21, 2012
Chion Wolf / WNPR

With the state legislative session underway - advocacy groups are talking about their “priorities.”

And in this “education session” - many of those priorities have to do with education and funding education. Today, we’ll talk policy with two consortiums...and see if some of their ideas on state government line up with yours.

Harriet Jones

Connecticut’s students are falling behind in science, technology, engineering and math. All this week WNPR is examining this problem, and its implications for our 21st century workforce. Today, Harriet Jones reports on efforts by employers to address the lack of STEM skills. 

The General Assembly reconvenes later this week for a session that looks to be jam-packed with issues. The state’s largest business organization says lawmakers will have a difficult balancing act. WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports.

Education Commissioner Stefan Pryor describes new figures on high school graduation rates in Connecticut as “unacceptable”. Students in poverty and students are color are far less likely to finish high school in four years.

Overall, nearly one in five Connecticut students fails to graduate high school in four years according to new data from the State Department of Education. But for kids who live at or below the poverty level, are Hispanic or black, in special ed or are English language learners -  it's one in three.

On Monday, Connecticut's new Education Commissioner Stefan Pryor addressed the task force charged with finding solutions to Connecticut's achievement gap - the disparity between poor and wealthy students. Connecticut's achievement gap is considered the widest in the nation. Commissioner Pryor joins us now by phone.

Bridgeport officials will conduct a national search for the city’s next school superintendent.  A state-appointed Board of Education has fired Bridgeport’s current superintendent as part of its takeover of the troubled school system.

Bridgeport’s state-appointed board of education will part ways with Superintendent John Ramos at the end of December.   An interim superintendent will come in to serve while education officials conduct a national search for the city’s next school leader. 

Hariadhi via Wikimedia Commons

Despite the high stakes attached to its multimillion-dollar statewide school testing program, new allegations of cheating show that Connecticut--like many other states--relies almost entirely on local districts to spot and report fraud.

An apparent cheating scandal at a Waterbury elementary school on the Connecticut Mastery Test came to light only after Waterbury officials alerted that state last month that something was amiss.

An investigator for the State Department of Education has begun to question teachers and staff at a Waterbury elementary school about suspected cheating on the 2011 Connecticut Mastery Tests.  This is the latest in a string of cheating scandals nationwide.

17 teachers and other employees at Hopeville School in Waterbury have been placed on leave as an investigator looks into possible test tampering.  A preliminary review showed many wrong answers on this year’s CMTS had been erased and corrected.  

A former Bridgeport Board of Education president says he and many city residents were surprised by the state’s quick takeover of the troubled school system.  

Max Medina Jr. says in 16 years serving on Bridgeport’s Board of Education he’s never seen anything quite as speedy as the recent decision by the state to intervene in the city’s schools.

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