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demographics

Young People, Don't Go!

Apr 19, 2012

Connecticut has lost more of our 25-34-year-old population since 1990 than any state but Michigan. I’m no demographer - but that’s not good. Of course, big population shifts are happening around the country as baby-boomers retire – but Connecticut is poised for the most hardship, unless we turn this around quickly.

Mormon Voting Trends

Dec 19, 2011
Chion Wolf

A recent Trinity College study takes a look at socio-demographic trends among the United States' Mormon population. Mormons make up just 1.4% of the U.S. adult population and vote heavily Republican.

It is also a group with very high rates of voter registration. We talk with someone who worked on this study, Juhem Navarro-Rivera and take listener phone calls about the media's coverage of the Mormon presidential candidates.

On Wednesday, lawmakers redrew the district lines for the state house and senate. That means some change for the city of Hartford. House Speaker Chris Donovan said Wednesday that, for the first time in 30 years, Windsor will have a house district in which its residents are the majority. That was the good news. The bad news for Hartford, though, is this. The same number of people will be representing the capital city -- but, in all likelihood, one of those representatives won't be from Hartford anymore. Matt Ritter represents the city's West End. He said the census is to blame.

Chion Wolf

By the end of  2010, over 15 percent of the nation’s population lived below the federal poverty line— that's just over $22 thousand dollars for a family of four.

Over a ten-year span, the US saw the poor population grow by 12.3 million, driving the total number of Americans in poverty to a historic high of 46.2 million.

...and the number of those poor people living in the suburbs increased by 25%. New research from the Brookings Institute explores how poverty is shifting from inner cities to the suburbs.

creative commons

Workplace expert Al Bhatt says our places of employment should be made up of jazz bands, rather than a marching band.

Bhatt’s done consulting work for big companies like Facebook, Siemens, American Express, and State Farm Insurance.

Now Facebook, I can see them being pretty improvisational...but an insurance company?  

Today, in advance of our “small business breakfast” tomorrow in Bridgeport, we’re going to look at the changing workplace in big businesses, and how they’re adapting to a new workforce.  

Our Growing Cities

Apr 20, 2011
Chion Wolf

It might be a stretch to say Connecticut cities are “booming,” but new census figures show they are growing.

People are starting to move back into Connecticut’s cities. This reverses a decades-long trend toward suburban sprawl and urban decline.  The five largest cities in the state have gained close to 23,000 residents.  There are more housing units, and more of those homes are filled with people.  

Advocates for Latinos will gather in Hartford on Wednesday to talk with lawmakers about issues affecting the state’s Hispanic community. As WNPR's Diane Orson reports, 2010 census figures show a big jump in Connecticut’s Latino population.   

The number of Hispanics in Connecticut increased nearly 50 percent in the last decade. State Representative Andres Ayala:

After decades of fleeing to the suburbs, Connecticut’s residents are moving back into cities.  That’s according to redistricting data gathered during the 2010 census.  

New Haven gained the most residents in the past decade. Stamford added the most new homes of any city. Hartford’s population grew by 2.6%, only the second time that city’s seen gains since 1960. And Bridgeport’s population grew by 3.4%, it’s first gain since 1950.  

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