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10% of Americans are living with diabetes. Are you one of them? Managing a chronic illness can already be difficult, but managing it during a pandemic can be nearly impossible.

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This hour, how will we remember a year in this pandemic? Grief can often leave us feeling incredibly alone. Especially when haven't been able to gather and commemorate our loss. How will we memorialize the lives and time lost this year?

If you have spent anytime journaling, or reflecting on this year either alone or with family.

Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont on his push to reopen and to vaccinate Connecticut. With variants of the disease appearing in the state, is this the time to loosen restrictions?

Plus, a gambling expansion deal was reached between the state and Connecticut’s two casino-owning tribes. What hurdles are left to clear?

Focus Features

It might just be that the pandemic is starting to wind down. Advertisers are anxious to act like it is. We're all maybe anxious to get some hugs back into our lives, or maybe we'll all just always be anxious about hugs. And: How does this all work for half-vaccinated couples? Plus: The Nose sees some parallels in the sexlessness of superheroes.

And: Promising Young Woman is Emerald Fennell's feature-film debut as a writer, director, and producer, and it's made her an Academy Award-nominated writer, director, and producer. The movie is nominated for five Oscars overall, including Best Picture and Best Actress for Carey Mulligan.

CHION WOLF / CONNECTICUT PUBLIC RADIO

A recent Connecticut Mirror report found a big drop in the number of students enrolled in school in Connecticut.  How has the pandemic hurt students, and how can state lawmakers help?  One of the leaders of the General Assembly Education Committee joins us.

Meanwhile, the leader of the Legislative Black and Puerto Rican Caucus says he is trying to dispel vaccination myths and get more Black and Hispanic residents interested in getting COVID-19 shots.  

  An unprecedented year; how many times have you heard that one? Did you anticipate that masks would become a staple part of our wardrobe?

Last Saturday marked the anniversary of the Connecticut pandemic lockdown. This hour, Yale Health epidemiologist Dr. Albert Ko joins us to reflect on one year in the coronavirus pandemic. 

We want to hear from you. What has this last year been like for you and your family? 

GUESTS:

Connecticut AFL-CIO (Screengrab)

Essential workers infected by the coronavirus want Connecticut’s workers’ compensation system updated to meet their needs.

Updated March 11, 2021 at 9:34 PM ET

President Biden is aiming for the country to begin to find a degree of normalcy and begin to move on from the coronavirus pandemic by the July Fourth holiday, Biden announced in his first prime-time address Thursday night from the White House on the one-year anniversary of the pandemic.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

On Monday, at least 100 yellow signs popped up on a lawn freshly emerged from snow, just off Route 1 in Greenwich. The phrase “Isolation Kills, Too” was written on them.

JMSuarez / Wikimedia Commons

In the pandemic, some residents have been working paycheck to paycheck to pay their bills, many have lost jobs and not everyone has a place to live.

This hour, we talk about the state of homelessness in Connecticut and across the country. Many community organizations have been working on new and innovative solutions to reduce  homelessness. 

Sheree Baldwin Muhammad, teacher at New Beginnings Family Academy

Starting this week, teachers and child care providers are now eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine. 

This hour, we talk with three Connecticut teachers and hear about what this past year has looked like for them and their students. 

Phil Roeder / Creative Commons

The theme of election fraud ran through this weekend's Conservative Political Action Conference. We talk about how "The Big Lie" is becoming a way for Republican leaders to rationalize the voter suppression measures making their way through state legislatures.

Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin speaks at a press conference announcing the opening of a neighborhood vaccine clinic at the Parker Memorial Community Center in the North End of Hartford.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin discusses coronavirus’ impact on students in Hartford, and vaccination efforts.  What does the governor's plan to focus more on age in vaccine distribution mean for people of color and low-income people in Hartford?

The mayor also has new responsibilities on his plate: Pushing for high speed rail in the region and leading the Connecticut Conference of Municipalities, an organization of cities and towns.


Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

The city of Hartford and St. Francis Hospital have teamed up to get people vaccinated at multiple neighborhood spots.

Ben Novak / Revive and Restore

The U.S. is about to surpass 500,000 deaths from COVID-19. That said, new cases are declining, hospitalizations and deaths are trending down, and vaccination rates are picking up, though inequities remain. We talk vaccines, variants, messaging, and more.

Also this hour: A new study finds that House members who hold extreme views receive far more airtime on cable and broadcast news than their moderate counterparts. Changes in the media have incentivized elected officials such as Marjorie Taylor Greene to build a national brand at the expense of legislating for their local constituents.

Last, welcome to Elizabeth Ann, a baby black-footed ferret cloned from Willa, who died more than 30 years ago.

Katherine May / Penguin Random House

Here in Connecticut, surviving long winters means getting plenty of sleep, extra vitamin D supplements and leaning into our favorite winter activities.

This hour, we talk with author Katherine May about her book Wintering: The Power of Rest and Retreat in Difficult Times and the act of wintering. 

Yehyun Kim / CT Mirror

When Gov. Ned Lamont got his first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine earlier this week, he asked local leaders to go to communities of color and tell them to “step up and do the right thing.”

Connecticut Education Association

Though Connecticut educators are considered essential workers, they are not yet eligible for vaccination against COVID-19. To address this, the Connecticut Education Association has launched a TV ad featuring Connecticut teachers of the year calling on the state to “Vaccinate educators now!” 

Petar Milošević / Wikimedia Commons

Navigating pregnancy should be an exciting time, but new parents don’t have the same support system right now. This hour, we talk about pregnancy and birth during a pandemic.

Creative Commons Zero - CC0

Happy Valentine’s Day Weekend! 

All you need is love, but navigating romantic relationships during the pandemic can be pretty tough. This hour, a look at pandemic love!

Quarantining means that we are all spending more time at home, and more time with our partners. Maintaining a healthy relationship during a high stress situation like this, can be difficult. 

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

The latest vaccination data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that some New England states are vaccinating against COVID-19 quicker than others, with Connecticut currently ranking as one of the top states in the U.S. and the top in New England.

New England states ranked by the percentage of people who have received their first COVID-19 vaccine dose:

David Wurtzel / Connecticut Public

Gov. Ned Lamont this week announced he’ll end an executive order that had extended civil immunity to Connecticut nursing homes and long-term care facilities during the pandemic.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

Distrust of the medical system for Deicin Garcia goes back to when she arrived from Mexico 15 years ago as an undocumented teenager. She and her family came to pick tobacco on a ranch about half an hour’s drive north of Hartford. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The General Assembly session is getting interesting, as lawmakers trot out their proposals. But this year does not resemble a normal session.  COVID-19 rules keep lawmakers at arms length from each other, and from lobbyists and the public. 

Today we talk to House Speaker Matt Ritter about how much lawmakers will be able to get done.  Are they doing the right thing by extending the governor’s emergency powers?  And is now the time to start phasing out a religious exemption to school vaccination requirements?

Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Carlos M. Vazquez II / Joint Chiefs of Staff

Moderna announced today they were making new versions of their vaccine that can be used as boosters against variants seen in South Africa, Brazil, and the U.K. The vaccine should be effective against variants but it seems to create fewer antibodies against the one that has emerged in South Africa. Either way, vaccines alone will not be enough. We talk about mutations and vaccines. 

Also this hour: The Biden inauguration was the most Catholic inauguration in history. Is a more liberal Christianity on the rise? 

Lastly, a tribute to John McDonough, actor, singer, and a Connecticut native.

Updated 5:06 p.m. ET

On Friday afternoon, President-Elect Joe Biden shared a detailed plan to tackle the COVID-19 vaccination rollout, promising to fight the pandemic with "the full strength of the federal government."

In a speech in Delaware, Biden laid out his five-part plan for how to speed up the vaccination campaign: Open up vaccine eligibility to more people; create more vaccination sites; increase vaccine supply; hire a vaccination workforce; and launch a large-scale public education campaign.

Netflix, Inc.

Tom Cruise's seventh Mission: Impossible installment has been one of the few huge Hollywood productions trying to to figure out how to film during the pandemic. Cruise has been in the news lately for blowing up at his crew for breaking COVID protocols, and now he's back in the news for… buying COVID enforcement robots?

And: Could front porches be just the right "magical intermediate zone" to keep communities connecting during a time of social distancing?

And finally: Nicolas Cage is hosting a documentary series on Netflix called History of Swear Words. Normally I'd try to give you a little more context here, but I feel like that first sentence pretty much covers it.

Volunteer Marti Simmons
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

Foodshare has been distributing food at Rentschler Field in East Hartford since the pandemic began. This site, which has served more than 227,000 households, reopened on Jan. 12, 2021, after Foodshare initially announced it would shut it down for the winter. With assistance from members of the Connecticut Air National Guard, Foodshare workers and volunteers distributed donated food on Tuesday to a line of cars estimated at 1,200. Some of those in the drive-thru line waited over an hour to collect food for friends and neighbors who couldn’t make the trip.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

The youth sports shutdown in Connecticut -- one caused by the coronavirus pandemic -- may soon end.

Baylor, Kim Mulkey
Brandon Wade / AP Photo

The University of Connecticut women’s basketball team’s big showdown with rival Baylor University slated for Thursday is the latest casualty of the coronavirus.

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