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The Connecticut Supreme Court wants to ensure that jury pools are diverse and representative of our communities. That could mean striking restrictions of who is allowed to serve on a jury. This hour, Chief Justice Richard Robinson joins us to answer our questions and yours about jury duty in our state.

Frank Franklin II / Associated Press

A lawsuit filed by a Connecticut woman over images of enslaved people has been dismissed by a Massachusetts judge. Tamara Lanier sued Harvard University two years ago to force the release of the rights to pictures of two people she says are her enslaved ancestors.

Judge Hears Arguments In Lawsuit Over Connecticut Transgender Athletes

Feb 26, 2021
FILE - In this Feb. 7, 2019, file photo, Bloomfield High transgender athlete Terry Miller (second from left) wins the final of the 55-meter dash over transgender athlete Andraya Yearwood (far left) and others in the Connecticut girls Class S indoor meet.
AP Photo/Pat Eaton-Robb

Lawyers for several school districts and the organization that oversees high school sports in Connecticut went before a federal judge Friday seeking the dismissal of a lawsuit that would prevent transgender girls in the state from competing in girls sports.

Mark Mirko / Hartford Courant

In 2013, a social worker named Winston Taylor showed up for jury duty in New London, Connecticut. He was being questioned as a potential juror in the murder trial of Evan J. Holmes. When a state's attorney asked Taylor about his perceptions of police, he said he had at times been fearful of cops -- based on his experiences as a Black American. Taylor also said he knew good police officers and would be a fair juror.

Judge Approves Shorter Sentence For Convicted Murderer-Turned-Prison Mentor

Jan 16, 2021

A Hartford Superior Court judge granted a sentence modification on Friday to Clyde Meikle, a man serving a 50-year prison sentence for killing his cousin in 1994.

Richard Drew / Associated Press

Connecticut’s own William Tong is one of 48 state attorneys general suing Facebook over its alleged anti-competitive practices. What’s the harm of Facebook’s practices? And what are the chances this lawsuit will succeed? To answer those questions, we invited Bloomberg News journalist Sarah Frier to join us on All Thing Considered. She covers social media companies extensively, and she’s written a book called No Filter: The Inside Story of Instagram.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Since Joe Biden became the president-elect, we’ve heard a lot about the series of losses the Trump campaign has suffered in court as it scuffles to find a way to keep President Donald Trump in the White House. Less talked about, but perhaps more important, is the Trump White House’s string of losses in court regarding its efforts to neuter the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA.

Updated at 3:27 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court has temporarily barred New York from enforcing strict attendance limits on places of worship in areas designated coronavirus hot spots, in a decision released just before midnight on Wednesday.

Courtesy: Purdue Pharma

A federal bankruptcy judge has approved an $8.3 billion settlement between Stamford’s Purdue Pharma and the U.S. Department of Justice. Connecticut is one of the states that brought suit against the drugmaker for its part in the opioid epidemic, and the state’s Attorney General, William Tong, has been outspoken in condemning the DOJ deal.

Official White House Photo by Joyce N. Boghosian / flickr creative commons

It's been eight days since Election Day. It's been four days since Joe Biden was projected to become President-elect Joe Biden.

But we've still got the secretary of state saying, "There will be a smooth transition to a second Trump administration." We've still got any number of lawsuits flailing their way through the courts in various states.

Are we really going to reject democratic elections to soothe Trump's ego?

jwblinn/iStock / Thinkstock

The U.S. Supreme Court’s new 6-3 conservative majority was assumed by many to be the death knell for the Affordable Care Act. But a funny thing seems to have happened Tuesday during oral arguments. Conservative Justices John Roberts and Brett Kavanaugh appeared to indicate their support for leaving the ACA intact -- with the exception of the individual mandate. 

New Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett heard her first oral arguments at the Supreme Court on Monday. Participating by phone with the other justices, a practice followed by the court since the coronavirus pandemic, she asked questions in turn in a set of cases that presented difficult procedural questions but no headlines.

The court said she did not participate in the court's work last week after being sworn in so she would be prepared for oral arguments this week.

Daniel Huizinga / Creative Commons

A lot of people are wondering if it's time to look at ">court packing," and other court reforms, to address judiciary dysfunction that we can see playing out during this election and in the confirmation of Justice Amy Coney Barrett. 

Frankie Graziano / WNPR

The confirmation of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett may be a threat to women’s reproductive rights and health. The first case she is set to hear on Nov. 10 will determine whether the Affordable Care Act continues on. 

Updated 10:52 p.m. ET

The Supreme Court, in a 5-3 vote, has reaffirmed a lower court's block on Wisconsin's plan that would have allowed ballots in the state to arrive up to six days after Election Day. Democrats and progressive groups asked the justices to intervene after a federal appeals court blocked the ballot-receipt plan.

Republicans argue that the deadline extension threatens the integrity of the election by changing the rules too close to the election, an argument they have made in similar cases.

The Senate has voted 52-48 to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court, just about a week before Election Day and 30 days after she was nominated by President Trump to fill the seat of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

In a White House ceremony following the vote Monday evening, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas administered the constitutional oath to Coney Barrett.

Updated at 10:51 a.m. ET

Republicans on the Senate Judiciary Committee moved Thursday to advance the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett for the Supreme Court, bringing President Trump's nominee within striking distance of confirmation and the court a step closer to a 6-3 conservative majority.

Civil Rights Attorneys Take Aim At Single-Family Zoning Using Woodbridge As Test Case

Sep 29, 2020
From left, Anika Singh Lemar, Erin Boggs, Connie Royster and Karen Anderson pose for a portrait at the Woodbridge Town Hall.
YEHYUN KIM / CTMirror.org

Woodbridge — It was 2009 when the country club in this affluent New Haven suburb started sliding into bankruptcy.

Fearful that the 150-acre property would be scooped up by a developer looking to build affordable or multi-family housing, Woodbridge officials purchased the property that spring for $7 million.

Yash Mori / Creative Commons

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died Friday evening, breaking the hearts of generations of women -- and men -- who have benefited from her work guaranteeing our rights to equal treatment under the law.

That same evening, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced that a Trump nominee to replace Ginsburg would receive a vote on the floor of the Senate. By Saturday, President Trump was claiming he had an "obligation" to replace her, "without delay." The loss is larger than either man could understand.

Crowd gathers in Stamford to remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Ali Warshavsky / Connecticut Public Radio

More than 100 people gathered in front of the Stamford courthouse Sunday to remember Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died Friday at 87 years old. 

Creative Commons CC0

This pandemic has caused a lot of interruptions in our lives. It has put people out of work, and it is also keeping some people from starting a career. This hour, we hear how recent law school graduates are preparing for the Connecticut Bar Exam amongst the pandemic. 

Cloe Poisson / CT Mirror

Over the objections of more than 400 inmates, a U.S. district court judge approved an agreement this week between the ACLU of Connecticut and the state on a class-action lawsuit filed to protect the incarcerated population from COVID-19.

State Supreme Court Tosses GOP Challenge To Mail-in Voting

Jul 20, 2020
Absentee Ballot
Airman 1st Class Zoe Thacker / U.S. Air Force

State Supreme Court Chief Justice Richard Robinson on Monday dismissed a challenge from four Republican congressional candidates who sought to stop an expansion of absentee voting in Connecticut’s Aug. 11 primary election.

In dismissing the case, Robinson agreed with the state officials that the Supreme Court did not have jurisdiction over the issue.

Stephanie Hicks / Flickr Creative Commons

State officials came together in Hartford Wednesday to assure Connecticut residents that they will fight for women’s reproductive rights following the Supreme Court’s decision to roll back access to birth control under the Affordable Care Act. Under the ruling, an employer or university can deny birth control coverage based on a religious or moral objection. 

Courtesy: Cristian Padilla Romero

Thousands of DACA recipients in Connecticut are breathing a sigh of relief after learning the U.S. Supreme Court blocked efforts by the Trump administration to end the program that protects them from deportation and allows them to work and study in the U.S. 

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

The U.S. Supreme Court has voted by a 6-3 majority that the 1964 Civil Rights Act barring sex discrimination in the workplace protects LGBTQ employees from being fired for their sexual orientation. Shawn Lang is deputy director of AIDS Connecticut (ACT). 

Courtesy: Thompson family

A federal appeals court has reversed a decision by immigration authorities in the case of a Connecticut man facing deportation, ordering the Board of Immigration Appeals to respect the state’s pardons.

A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit that alleged Ben & Jerry's Homemade Inc. misleads consumers with claims that its farms protect the environment and keep their cows contented.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Advocates for undocumented immigrants want federal law enforcement to stay out of state courthouses. Members of the Connecticut Immigrant Rights Alliance and several others protested Monday on the steps of the state Supreme Court. 

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

Richard Colangelo Jr., recognized most recently as the prosecutor in the Fotis Dulos murder case, is Connecticut’s newest chief state’s attorney.

The former Stamford state’s attorney is settling into his role as the state’s top prosecutor and administrative head of the Division of Criminal Justice. He replaced Kevin Kane, who recently retired as the state's longest-serving chief state’s attorney after 13 years in the position. 

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