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Coronavirus

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Connecticut reported its lowest number of one-day deaths due to the coronavirus Monday, as the state prepares for a second round of business openings Wednesday.

Osborn Correctional Nursing Shortage Even Worse Amid Pandemic, Union Says

Jun 15, 2020
Osborn Correctional Institution
Cloe Poisson / CT Mirror

A year-long shortage of nurses at the Osborn Correctional Institution in Somers has become an even more pressing problem with the onset of COVID-19, the union representing the nursing staff says.

DOC Commissioner Rollin Cook Resigns

Jun 14, 2020
Rollin Cook
Andrius Banevicius / CT Department of Correction

Department of Correction Commissioner Rollin Cook has resigned from his post effective July 1, citing family obligations in Utah.

Cook announced his resignation in a heartfelt internal memo Friday.

Black Protesters Recount Growing Up In A Mostly White Town

Jun 14, 2020
Jacqueline Rabe Thomas / CT Mirror

When Naomi Jones graduated from Waterford High School three years ago, there were just three dozen black students in her school of 846 students. There was just one black teacher.

eggy band
Eggy / Facebook

Self-isolation and social distancing have forced musical groups -- choirs, orchestras and other ensembles -- to temporarily disband or use unsatisfactory videoconferencing to rehearse because of the pandemic. But one Connecticut band whose members share a house in Woodbridge decided to self-isolate together, and they are making the most of it.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

With the second phase of Gov. Ned Lamont’s plan to reopen state businesses set for Wednesday, the governor’s office announced Saturday afternoon that the number of patients currently hospitalized with COVID-19 continued to decline. The governor’s office said 233 patients are hospitalized in Connecticut with COVID-19 -- 11 fewer than Friday. 

New Haven Correctional Center
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Department of Correction Commissioner Rollin Cook will resign his position effective July 1, Gov. Ned Lamont's office announced Friday. 

A new World Bank report warns that the pandemic has plunged the global economy into a deep recession of historic proportions, and the recovery outlook is grim, particularly for developing countries.

When Dr. Li Wenliang died of COVID-19 several weeks after the Chinese whistleblower tried to warn the world about the coronavirus, his family was expecting to grow in the coming months.

Now his widow, Fu Xuejie, has welcomed their second child, a boy, to the world without him.

"Husband, are you watching from heaven? The last gift you sent to me has been born," Fu said in a note posted to the Chinese social media platform WeChat. "I will definitely take care of him well."

Photos: Connecticut's Beardsley Zoo

Jun 11, 2020
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

The Beardsley Zoo in Bridgeport opened to visitors at 50% capacity last week for the first time since it closed just before COVID-19 restrictions took effect nearly three months ago. The zoo cares for some of the most critically endangered animals on the planet and does crucial work with education, research and conservation. It’s also the only zoo in Connecticut accredited by the AZA (Association for Zoos and Aquariums).

AP Photo/Mary Altaffer

Gov. Ned Lamont urged residents Thursday to see the reopening of the economy as a chance to restart. Meanwhile, a new COVID-19 antibody testing program is set to begin in Connecticut to combat the virus, and state officials announced a new job training program that will launch alongside the next phase of the state’s reopening efforts on June 17. 

Do You Speak Corona?

Jun 11, 2020
EpicTop10 / Creative Commons

It took two years for the word AIDS to get from coinage to dictionary. It took COVID-19 thirty-four days. The pandemic has inspired a thousand new or repurposed words, slang, nicknames, and neologisms.

It has changed the way we speak.  

Sgt. Ashley N. Sokolov / U.S. Air Force

This is part of a series of shows from Where We Live about the future of work after the COVID-19 pandemic.

The pandemic has caused major disruptions for workers' careers, but the latest numbers show women have been hit particularly hard.

Women, and especially women of color, are bearing some of the largest economic impacts of the pandemic, from facing higher rates of unemployment to holding the majority of frontline essential jobs.

This hour: how will COVID-19 worsen gender inequality in the workplace?

We talk about how societal expectations around child care duties affect parents’ careers especially when schools have been closed.

UConn To Resume Classes In August, But Only With Major Pandemic Protections

Jun 10, 2020
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

University of Connecticut students will be able to return to classes Aug. 31, but President Thomas Katsouleas warned Wednesday it will be an “academic semester and campus experience that will be unlike anything we have seen previously.”

COVID-19 testing
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Every Thursday, a researcher from Yale University picks up a cooler from the East Shore Water Pollution Abatement Facility in New Haven.

In that cooler is a week’s worth of samples from the sewer system that experts call “sludge,” or the solid waste that is left over after treating wastewater. It can contain a mixture of chemicals, metals and remnants of human waste that is flushed down the toilet. 

Jonathan McNicol / Connecticut Public Radio

The leagues are working in earnest toward starting back up. The NBA has a plan. Major League Baseball can't seem to work one out. Major League Soccer might beat them both back onto the field.

How is this all going to work? What are sports going to look like when they start playing games again? Should they start playing games again?

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

On March 8, 2020 Gov. Ned Lamont announced the first declared case of coronavirus in a Connecticut resident. 

Just 12 weeks later, the death toll in the state surpassed 4,000. In between, life had radically changed for everyone in many different ways. 

Federal Decisions Unravel Parts Of Two COVID-19 Executive Branch Orders

Jun 9, 2020
Governor Ned Lamont
Cloe Poisson / CTMirror.org

Separate federal rulings this week have rolled back portions of two COVID-related executive branch orders: one suspending fingerprinting for gun permits and another restricting hospital visitation rights for families and friends of people with disabilities.

Tameeka Coleman, a single mother who was previously homeless and living on the streets, was able to find a condo through the nonprofit Alpha Community Services, YMCA, in Bridgeport.
Contributed photo

Tameeka Coleman and six of her children lived on the streets before moving into a shelter in Fairfield.

“We were together, so it was bearable,” Coleman, 38, said. The hardest part was when her children cried for their home. “They wanted to know how we had lost our apartment,” said Coleman, who was evicted after she couldn’t pay the rent.   

ACLU And Connecticut Settle COVID-19 Prison Lawsuit

Jun 8, 2020
Kelan Lyons / CT Mirror

The ACLU of Connecticut has reached an agreement with the state over its COVID-19 lawsuit filed to protect incarcerated people from the virus.

Connecticut Businesses Ready To Reopen But Worry Whether Customers Will Return

Jun 8, 2020
connecticut businesses reopen
Cloe Poisson / CT Mirror

For some Connecticut businesses scheduled to reopen on June 17, the worry is finding enough disinfectant. For others, the biggest question isn’t about opening their doors but whether anyone will be coming through them any time soon.

Most business operators contacted Monday said the new guidelines issued by Gov. Ned Lamont’s administration for the next phase of Connecticut’s economic re-start in the COVID-19 era were about what they’ve been expecting for weeks.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

Glastonbury High School seniors are receiving their diplomas now, even though the governor has paved the way for group graduation ceremonies during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Ali Warshavsky / Connecticut Public Radio

With the announcement that gyms can reopen next week in Connecticut, some owners are preparing their spaces to allow more distance between members. Meanwhile, others say they don’t have the space to accommodate enough customers to make money.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

A group of health officials gathered in Geneva, Switzerland, to discuss infectious disease learn that forty-seven people at an internment camp in Indonesia have died from acute hemorrhagic fever.

This is how Pulitzer Prize-winning author Lawrence Wright, begins his new novel that in many ways, predicts the pandemic we're currently experiencing. He joins us to talk about it. 

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

This is the first part in a series of shows from Where We Live about the future of work after the COVID-19 pandemic.

Many Connecticut residents are used to spending a lot of time commuting, whether driving on a highway, riding on a train to the city or taking the bus across town. But the number of drivers and ridership across all modes of transportation have dropped dramatically with stay-at-home orders and the closing of non-essential businesses.

This hour, with Connecticut beginning to reopen, what will the “new commute” look like?

Ebony Barnes 44, (center) of Bridgeport during the Caravan 4 Justice gather at the Connecticut State Capitol to peacefully demonstrate against the systematic abuse of police power perpetrated against the black community on June 7, 2020 in Hartford.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

A caravan of cars that began in Stamford and stopped in four other towns before making its way to the state Capitol in Hartford on Sunday was among dozens of rallies, demonstrations and protests over the weekend after the recent death of George Floyd. 

Hundreds of doctors and other medical personnel Friday took a knee in front of the Yale School of Medicine to demonstrate their solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement.
Emily Hays / New Haven Independent

Thousands of demonstrators across Connecticut joined protest marches and rallies Saturday in the growing movement for racial justice triggered by the Minneapolis police killing of George Floyd and other incidents of police violence against people of color.

Lamont Makes A Father’s Day Gesture To Restaurants

Jun 5, 2020
Diners on the patio of Mondo’s in Middletown on May 20, the first day restaurants were allowed to open for outdoor dining.
Cloe Poisson / CTMirror.org

Gov. Ned Lamont, whose administration has been facing intense lobbying by the restaurant industry over COVID-19 restrictions, made a modest concession Friday by allowing indoor dining on June 17, three days ahead of the previously scheduled second phase of reopening on June 20.

Gilad Raphaelli / Flickr Creative Commons

This hour, we’re starting at the end: Death.

Knowledge of our mortality affects almost everything about us. And lately, because of the Covid-19 pandemic, and the murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery, death is on our phones, in the headlines, and in the air.

COVID-19 testing at the Urgent Care Center of Connecticut on March 25, 2020 in Bloomfield, Connecticut.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Towns and cities facing mounting costs associated with COVID-19 will get some help as they close out their budgets for the fiscal year. The state also announced Thursday that unemployment remains at historic highs, though new weekly claims are slowing.

Gov. Ned Lamont said $75 million has been allocated for the creation of a Connecticut Municipal Coronavirus Relief Fund Program to help towns and cities cover costs associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. 

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