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Coronavirus

Ali Warshavsky / Connecticut Public Radio

With the announcement that gyms can reopen next week in Connecticut, some owners are preparing their spaces to allow more distance between members. Meanwhile, others say they don’t have the space to accommodate enough customers to make money.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

A group of health officials gathered in Geneva, Switzerland, to discuss infectious disease learn that forty-seven people at an internment camp in Indonesia have died from acute hemorrhagic fever.

This is how Pulitzer Prize-winning author Lawrence Wright, begins his new novel that in many ways, predicts the pandemic we're currently experiencing. He joins us to talk about it. 

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

This is the first part in a series of shows from Where We Live about the future of work after the COVID-19 pandemic.

Many Connecticut residents are used to spending a lot of time commuting, whether driving on a highway, riding on a train to the city or taking the bus across town. But the number of drivers and ridership across all modes of transportation have dropped dramatically with stay-at-home orders and the closing of non-essential businesses.

This hour, with Connecticut beginning to reopen, what will the “new commute” look like?

Ebony Barnes 44, (center) of Bridgeport during the Caravan 4 Justice gather at the Connecticut State Capitol to peacefully demonstrate against the systematic abuse of police power perpetrated against the black community on June 7, 2020 in Hartford.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

A caravan of cars that began in Stamford and stopped in four other towns before making its way to the state Capitol in Hartford on Sunday was among dozens of rallies, demonstrations and protests over the weekend after the recent death of George Floyd. 

Hundreds of doctors and other medical personnel Friday took a knee in front of the Yale School of Medicine to demonstrate their solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement.
Emily Hays / New Haven Independent

Thousands of demonstrators across Connecticut joined protest marches and rallies Saturday in the growing movement for racial justice triggered by the Minneapolis police killing of George Floyd and other incidents of police violence against people of color.

Lamont Makes A Father’s Day Gesture To Restaurants

Jun 5, 2020
Diners on the patio of Mondo’s in Middletown on May 20, the first day restaurants were allowed to open for outdoor dining.
Cloe Poisson / CTMirror.org

Gov. Ned Lamont, whose administration has been facing intense lobbying by the restaurant industry over COVID-19 restrictions, made a modest concession Friday by allowing indoor dining on June 17, three days ahead of the previously scheduled second phase of reopening on June 20.

Gilad Raphaelli / Flickr Creative Commons

This hour, we’re starting at the end: Death.

Knowledge of our mortality affects almost everything about us. And lately, because of the Covid-19 pandemic, and the murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery, death is on our phones, in the headlines, and in the air.

COVID-19 testing at the Urgent Care Center of Connecticut on March 25, 2020 in Bloomfield, Connecticut.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Towns and cities facing mounting costs associated with COVID-19 will get some help as they close out their budgets for the fiscal year. The state also announced Thursday that unemployment remains at historic highs, though new weekly claims are slowing.

Gov. Ned Lamont said $75 million has been allocated for the creation of a Connecticut Municipal Coronavirus Relief Fund Program to help towns and cities cover costs associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Travis Wise / flickr creative commons

In 2007, journalist Alan Weisman published The World Without Us. It was an international bestseller. The book tries to answer what is ultimately a simple question: What happens to the Earth if human beings disappear? Here's how Weisman puts it in the book: "Say a Homo sapiens-specific virus -- natural or diabolically nano-engineered -- picks us off but leaves everything else intact." Then what?

And over these last few months, we've gotten maybe a fraction of a percentage point there. Temporarily. Maybe not directly because of coronavirus, but indirectly because of our absence and scarceness due to stay-at-home orders and the like. And so... then what?

HARTFORD, CT- May 12,2020: Monique Coleman receives a COVID-19 test at a newly opened mobile testing center in the north end of Hartford.
Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

State and social service leaders announced a new public-private program Wednesday to help undocumented immigrants through economic hardships caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Later in the day, education officials announced that in-person high school graduations, with graduates able to sit together, can begin in July.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

There’s long been good evidence for the premise that racism is bad for your health. And that truth stands whether you’re the victim or the perpetrator. In light of both the racial disparities of the coronavirus pandemic and the momentous events in the wake of George Floyd’s death, Connecticut Public Radio’s All Things Considered host, John Henry Smith, spoke with Dr. Cato T. Laurencin, a professor of orthopedic surgery at UConn. 

Connecticut Provides Coronavirus Assistance For Undocumented Residents

Jun 3, 2020
Cloe Poisson / CT Mirror

Gov. Ned Lamont struck a partnership Wednesday with critics in the immigrant-rights community, promising $3.5 million in state and philanthropic dollars to help undocumented families ineligible for federal pandemic relief.

COVID Testing Ordered For All Nursing Home, Assisted Living Center Staff

Jun 2, 2020
Cloe Poisson / CT Mirror

After weeks of controversy over inadequate COVID-19 testing at nursing homes, Gov. Ned Lamont has ordered mandatory testing of all staff and residents at nursing homes, assisted living facilities and elderly residential communities.

Ali Warshavsky / Connecticut Public Radio

Right now, the state of Connecticut says restaurants could be allowed to resume indoor service on June 20. But some restaurant owners are pushing for inside dining as soon as this week.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

Something different is happening in America at this moment. Do you feel it? We want to hear from you. Call us during our live show Tuesday, from 1 to 2 p.m., at 888-720-9677 or 888-720-WNPR.

People across America are protesting the same police brutality against black Americans that never seems to stop.

America has suffered more deaths from COVID-19 than any other nation, and we still don't have a federal plan to deal with it, despite the efforts of health care workers and scientists.

President Trump had threatened to deploy the military if the state officials he first felt the need to denigrate couldn't control the looting in their locales. He proceeded to order the police to use tear gas and flash grenades to disperse peaceful protesters so that he could pose in front of a burned church with a Bible in his hand.

Vape Marketing Linked To COVID-19 Draws Critics

Jun 2, 2020
Vernon Police Officer Joshua Wells holds an e-cigarette that contained THC “juice,” the active ingredient in marijuana.
Kate Farrish / Connecticut Health I-Team

Vape manufacturers have long been accused of marketing to teens with flavors like mango and cotton candy. Now vaping opponents say vape manufacturers are exploiting the coronavirus with face mask and hand sanitizer giveaways and #COVID-19 discounts.

Dennis Carr / Flickr

The beginning of the month means the rent is due. But what if you lost your job during the COVID-19 pandemic?

This hour, we talk to a housing advocate about what protections exist for Connecticut residents who can’t afford housing costs right now. And we learn about the lasting consequences for residents who are at risk for eviction if the state and federal governments don’t provide additional protections.

As Barbershops, Hair Salons, Casinos Open, $619.9 Million State Deficit Projected Due To COVID-19

Jun 1, 2020
SHELTON, CT - MAY 12, Hair Stylist Georgeanne DeCosta works in close clipping the hair of her 5 year old son Rock that is going to grow out into a mohawk in their home on May 12, 2020 in Shelton, Connecticut.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Hair salons, barbershops and casinos reopened in Connecticut Monday after being closed for more than two months due to COVID-19 restrictions and precautions. Along with the good news of these reopenings came grim new projections from the state comptroller about the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

foxwoods casinos reopening coronavirus
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

Connecticut’s two casinos are taking paying customers for the first time in two months.

Tribal leadership shuttered the casinos March 18 for the first time in their history over fears of the spread of COVID-19.

Gerry Lauzon / Creative Commons

The pandemic has laid bare how racism in housing, education, employment, and access to health care, disproportionately hurts Black Americans more than White Americans and leads to police brutality against people the police are supposed to protect.

Disparities In Hispanic And Black Death Rates Much Worse Than Previously Reported

May 31, 2020
A hearse leads a funeral procession for Hazel Bailey to her burial service at Mountain View Cemetery in Bloomfield. Bailey, an African-American, died of COVID-19 on April 19 at age 73.
Cloe Poisson / CTMirror.org

After reporting for weeks that Connecticut Hispanics are only half as likely to die from COVID-19 as non-Hispanic whites, state officials now say that Hispanics here are substantially more likely to die from the disease.

State officials were also reporting that the state’s black population was only 26% more likely than whites to die from a coronavirus infection when in fact their likelihood of death is 2.5 times as high.  The death rate for Hispanics is now calculated at 67% higher than non-Hispanic whites.

Why the change? And why were they getting it wrong?

People Throughout Connecticut Protest The Death Of George Floyd

May 30, 2020
Joe Amon/Connecticut Public/NENC

Protesters in Hartford, New Haven, Bridgeport, New London, and other parts of Connecticut joined a nationwide call for action Saturday following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody. The protests come as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to unfold -- one day after the Gov. Ned Lamont signed an executive order that further relaxes state restrictions related to the virus.

coronavirus, Weaver, High Schools
Joe Amon/Connecticut Public/NENC

We’ve heard a lot about the distance learning going on at K-12 schools during this coronavirus pandemic shutdown. But there’s a good number of kids who are not distance learning for a variety of reasons and badly need schools to reopen. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Hospitalizations due to the COVID-19 pandemic experienced the largest one day drop to date, Gov. Ned Lamont said Friday. Meanwhile, state colleges and universities said they’re planning to have students back on campus this fall.

This is the ninth and final episode of US in the Time of Coronavirus.

We’ve surpassed 100,000 deaths in our country, and more than 3,826 deaths here in Connecticut as of Friday, May 20th. These numbers aren’t just numbers. They’re mothers, daughters, sisters, fathers, brothers and sons; Grandmas and grandpas, and best friends.

Selbe Lynn / Creative Commons

Monday is the day that Connecticut’s two casinos will reopen after weeks of shutdown due to the coronavirus pandemic. Gov. Ned Lamont has been open about his feeling that it’s too early to resume gaming at Foxwoods and Mohegan Sun. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

The push to get more people screened for the novel coronavirus continued Thursday, as state and federal officials converged outside a community center in Hartford to promote a new mobile COVID-19 testing unit.

Connecticut has significantly expanded its testing capacity in recent weeks, but the state has struggled to increase the number of residents tested in communities hardest hit by COVID-19.

A Mayor And U.S. Senator Sit For A Public COVID-19 Test

May 28, 2020
New Haven Mayor Justin Elicker gets tested with a nasal swab for COVID-19 by nurse John Grimes on the New Haven Green. At right, are Gov. Ned Lamont and U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal. The walk-up testing  was conducted by Murphy Medical Associates.
Cloe Poisson / CTMirror.org

U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal sat under a pop-up canopy on the New Haven Green, tilted his head back and submitted to a nasal swab for a COVID-19 test. The moment was a photo op for a media-savvy senator and a public-service pitch for a state promoting testing as it slowly loosens restrictions on commerce.

Wonderval / pixabay.com

Last week marked the beginning of a phased reopening of Connecticut. Several businesses are permitted to reopen under Phase 1 of Connecticut’s reopening, including restaurants that are able to open for outdoor dining. This hour, we hear how restaurants have fared through the shutdown, and what reopening looks like. 

Absentee Ballot
Airman 1st Class Zoe Thacker / U.S. Air Force

Gov. Ned Lamont recently signed an executive order that will allow people who are concerned about contracting the coronavirus to use an absentee ballot for the August presidential primary elections. That has some members of the state Republican party upset. 

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