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Coronavirus

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Because of the coronavirus, New York City is now home to an abundance of underemployed, world-class musicians. Many of them will be participating in a 24-hour, live streaming music marathon beginning this evening.

Disney

Last Friday night, Disney released the #1 movie in the country -- Pixar's Onward -- for digital download on iTunes/Amazon/etc. It's safe to say, that's the first time that's ever happened.

When you say "the #1 movie in the country," you're talking about what was #1 last weekend or maybe last week. Onward was also the #1 movie in the country specifically on last Thursday... when it made $33,296. There are times when movies make that per screen.

There's a movie on that domestic chart that one person went to see. It made $6. That movie, though, wasn't at the bottom of that chart… because there are three movies on that chart that no one went to see. In the country.

Hartford Hospital
Dave Wurtzel / Connecticut Public

It’s now been three weeks since the first confirmed case of COVID-19 in Connecticut. It seems like nearly every part of life has changed -- and it’s exhausting.

Joe Amon/Connecticut Public/NENC

The coronavirus pandemic has closed schools across the U.S., affecting nearly 2 million public school students in New England alone. What are the educational and social impacts of this sudden shift to remote learning? What about students with special learning needs? And how might the COVID-19 crisis widen the inequities in our K-12 educational system?

Updated at 5:50 p.m. ET

President Trump has signed a historic $2 trillion economic recovery package into law Friday afternoon, shortly after the House of Representatives approved the bill.

In an Oval Office ceremony Friday, the president thanked Republicans and Democrats "for coming together, setting aside their differences and putting America first" to pass the legislation. Trump was joined by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy. No Democrats were present at the signing.

Hanging Hills Brewery
Adam Hushin/Connecticut Public

One industry that’s positively flourished in Connecticut in the last decade or so is small craft breweries. As of January, more than 100 were open up and down the state.

But with many so dependent on now-shuttered taprooms, and on their partnerships with restaurants, they’re in the eye of the economic storm, as coronavirus takes its toll.

expecting parents
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

One Hartford woman looks at the COVID-19 pandemic as the “icing on the cake” for her challenging pregnancy.

Lauren Perrault, 33, is used to husband Gabe Peterson, 35, being by her side at the doctor’s office. 

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Gov. Ned Lamont said he asked the federal government on Thursday to declare a major disaster in Connecticut as the number of COVID-19 cases in the state surpassed 1,000.  

violinist
Hartford Symphony Orchestra

As many people around the world hunker down in isolation, performing artists find themselves in uncharted territory. With no upcoming performances to practice for, how are they managing their time? Does creativity take over when boredom sets in?

Updated at 6:37 p.m. ET

President Trump told governors his administration is working on publishing guidelines for state and local governments to use to determine whether to increase or relax social distancing rules to contain the spread of the coronavirus.

The announcement came ahead of the White House's regular news conference on its response to the pandemic.

Kathea Pinto / flickr creative commons

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Humans have been using soap for literally millennia -- nearly five of them... at least.

And while there's a run on alcohol-based hand sanitizers, it turns out that good, old-fashioned soap is a simpler, more-reliable way to destroy all that coronavirus that might be all over your gross, dirty hands.

Dr. Leslie Torres-Rodriguez, Superintendent of Hartford Public Schools helps a young man with his meal served by Food & Child Nutrition Services, Hartford Public Schools at Samuel Valentine Arroyo Recreation Center in Pope Park on March 16, 2020.
Joe Amon/Connecticut Public/NENC

Public school students still have nearly a month of distance learning -- if not longer. Many parents find themselves in a situation where they have to work from home while caring for their children and help teach them.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

As COVID-19 spreads further across the state, more people who suspect they have the virus are seeking testing. Tests remain in high demand as the state struggles to get residents results in less than a week.

Connecticut Doesn't Track How Many Nursing Home Workers Have Coronavirus

Mar 26, 2020

As coronavirus cases flourish in some state nursing homes and assisted living centers, operators of those facilities have stepped up precautions, sent workers home and isolated residents who may have been exposed.

Pandemic Book Club

Mar 26, 2020
Books HD

In the midst of the pandemic, it’s easy to keep the TV on all day. But it’s also the perfect time to take a step back and start a new book -- or even read an old favorite.

This hour, we discuss what we’re reading while we’re stuck at home and how to make reading a daily habit.

The Senate late Wednesday unanimously approved a historic $2 trillion stimulus bill aimed at helping individuals and businesses survive the COVID-19 pandemic’s powerful blow to  the economy.

The bill would pour billions of dollars into states like Connecticut, give direct cash payments to most Americans and boost unemployment benefits to those who lose their jobs or are furloughed.

Updated at 10:51 a.m. ET

A record 3.28 million Americans filed for unemployment benefits last week as the coronavirus pandemic shut down much of the country. The Labor Department's report for the week ended March 21 was one of the first official indicators of how many people have suddenly been forced out of work nationally.

In the prior report, for the week ended March 14, initial claims totaled 282,000.

Updated at 11:47 p.m. ET

The U.S. Senate overwhelmingly approved a $2 trillion relief package Wednesday night designed to alleviate some of the worst effects of the swift economic downturn currently underway as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

Ahead of the 96-0 vote, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) told lawmakers, "Our nation obviously is going through a kind of crisis that is totally unprecedented in living memory."

 Yale University
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Universities across the state that have shifted their semesters completely online due to the coronavirus pandemic are working to figure out whether they’ll provide refunds to students who’ve paid for expenses like on-campus housing and meal plans. 

Ned Lamont
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

As federal lawmakers worked on finalizing a $2 trillion coronavirus stimulus package, Connecticut officials on Wednesday detailed their own economic recovery plans for small businesses to tackle the “unprecedented” pace of jobless claims in the state.

Governors of several states have closed gun shops and dealers as part of their orders shuttering “non-essential” businesses to the public in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, drawing the ire and legal firepower of gun rights groups. Adding to the confusion, businesses selling firearms are exempted from these orders in states like Connecticut, Ohio and Illinois.

Pharmacy
Ryan Caron King/Connecticut Public

Doctors and nurses are finding themselves on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic. But other health care workers are also putting themselves on front lines every day: pharmacists. 

The Legacy Theatre in Branford, Connecticut, isn’t technically open yet. But Artistic Director Keely Baisden Knudsen says they’ve done more than 70 performances without a building.

JOE AMON/CONNECTICUT PUBLIC/NENC

As many anticipated, the coronavirus situation in Connecticut is expanding. More people are getting tested, more people are confirmed to have COVID-19, more deaths are being reported, more executive orders are being issued, and more help is being requested by hospitals.

Machu Picchu
Katie de Chabert / Provided

This story has been updated. 

After nearly three weeks in Peru, which earlier this month closed its borders, canceled most flights, and ordered mandatory quarantine, Katie de Chabert and her family members have finally returned home.

De Chabert, who is a school teacher from Madison, her mother and her niece had been stuck in Cuzco for the last two weeks during the country's coronavirus lockdown.  

Updated at 2:20 a.m. ET

The Trump administration and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced early Wednesday that the White House and Senate had reached a deal for an unprecedented $2 trillion spending package aimed at propping up individuals, businesses and the nation's health care system amid the onslaught of the coronavirus pandemic.

White House legislative affairs director Eric Ueland made the announcement at about 1 a.m. ET.

"Ladies and gentlemen, we are done. We have a deal," Ueland said.

Brian Crawford / Creative Commons

Restaurants around the country have closed their doors to in-dining service to help slow the spread of Coronavirus and prevent unnecessary deaths. That's good news.

But it's also bad news for an industry that employs 160,000 people in Connecticut alone, many laid off and waiting for their unemployment application to be processed by our overwhelmed state system.  

Trump Wants Normalcy. Lamont, Cuomo Warn The Worst Is Yet To Come.

Mar 24, 2020
March 24, Governor Ned Lamont salutes the Governor's Foot Guard and Horse Guard before a tour of a mobile field hospital they erected on the grounds of Saint Francis Hospital on March 24, 2020 in Hartford, Connecticut.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

On a day when Gov. Ned Lamont watched a mobile field hospital go up on the grounds of a Hartford medical center in anticipation of a surge of COVID-19 cases, President Donald J. Trump told America it soon may be time to go back to work.

Arts organizations are at a virtual standstill as much of the world hunkers down to avoid spreading the coronavirus. It’s predicted that many organizations will not survive the crisis. Even long-established institutions are feeling the pinch.

DMV
Alyssa Hurlburt / CTMirror.org

The Department of Motor Vehicles commissioner directed nearly 400 staffers to return to work Tuesday morning at the main office in Wethersfield despite multiple employees being diagnosed with COVID-19 — the first starting eight days ago.

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