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Looking for Places to Sell Local Wine

Mar 1, 2011
Chion Wolf

Connecticut farms that make and bottle their own wine are looking for more venues to showcase their products. Some package stores oppose two proposals that would give farmers more places to sell bottled wine.

Wikimedia Commons

As much as we romanticize the Leatherman, Connecticut's most famous vagabond, we should remember too that the post Civil War era -- his era -- was a time of tramp laws, meant to discourage exactly the sort of person he was.

Malloy is the Anti-Christie

Mar 1, 2011
Chion Wolf

Wednesday, New Jersey Governor Chris Christie told MSNBC that he’ll be waiting at the border for Connecticut’s jobs after Governor Dannel Malloy’s proposed tax hike drives business out of Connecticut. Malloy responded to his claims again Thursday.

Malloy drew a line between him and Christie by wanting to slightly raise taxes to help balance his state’s budget.

“I suppose I’m the anti-Christie.”

Denise Nappier Hospitalized

Feb 28, 2011
Chion Wolf Photo

Treasurer Denise L. Nappier remains hospitalized today after seeking help Friday for what her staff described only as "a hyper-tension-related illness."

The treasurer's office issued a brief statement today saying that Nappier sought treatment Friday afternoon at Hartford Hospital.

"She is resting comfortably and handling work-related matters as necessary," the statement said. "Treasurer Nappier asks for privacy as she recovers fully."

The Secret Life of Water

Feb 25, 2011
Nancy Eve Cohen

Environmentalists want to protect the states’ rivers from running dry. The state and federal government want to keep public water supplies safe from terrorists. These competing interests have led to a battle over information, which is going before the state’s Freedom of Information Commission tomorrow. 

Photos: The White House/Chion Wolf

It’s a fresh edition of Politics, Burgers and Beer with Rich Hanley! PB&B regular, New York magazine’s John Heilemann, joins us to talk about President Obama’s response to the upheaval in Egypt, the proposed federal budget, and Governor Malloy's proposed state budget—plus conversation on all the newest news and developing developments in the world of politics.

Chion Wolf, WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy unveiled his new two year budget yesterday.  The $19.7 budget for 2012 seeks to close a $3.2 billion deficit through tax hikes, spending cuts, and 2 billion dollars in union concessions.  

Chion Wolf/WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy presented his plan to close the state’s $3.2 billion budget gap to a joint session of the state legislature today. 

Budget Day

Feb 16, 2011
Chion Wolf, WNPR

Budget day at the Connecticut capitol used to be like Christmas morning…you were never sure what you’d be getting.

Sure, like with Santa Claus you had a pretty good idea.  I mean you’d been dropping hints for months.  But, the final budget presented by the governor always included a hint of surprise.

Helping Small Businesses With Energy Costs

Feb 16, 2011

Governor Dannel Malloy announced today a pilot program to help small businesses pay for energy costs. 

Last year President Obama challenged the nation’s businesses to double their exports within 5 years. Connecticut has been responding to that call, and as WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports, small business has been a key part of the effort.

Exporting—selling products overseas—is complex and often challenging. It may not seem to be a natural fit for a small business. Not so, says economist Peter Gioia of the Connecticut Business and Industry Association.

Chion Wolf Photo

Snow Damages Farm Buildings, Some Animals Killed

Feb 9, 2011
Diane Miller

Foxtongue photo via Flickr Creative Commons

What's the impact on the state pension fund when a low-paid legislator moves to a high-paid administration job? We like this piece on "pension spikes" from a policy blog

But maybe it doesn't matter, because we're not really making any serious attempt to fund that whole system.

Harriet Jones

We hear all the time that small businesses are having trouble accessing credit. But sometimes it’s hard to picture what that means both for an individual firm, and for the wider economy. To find out more, WNPR’s Harriet Jones visited a construction company that’s currently rehabbing several old homes in Middletown.

No Good Place to Put the Snow

Feb 4, 2011
Flickr Creative Commons, Charles Jeffrey Danoff

Will New Jobs Save Connecticut's Budget?

Feb 1, 2011
Flickr Creative Commons, smemon87

Winter Markets Help Northeast Farmers Survive

Jan 31, 2011
Nancy Eve Cohen

Farmers markets have seen huge growth in the past three decades. They give consumers access to local food, sometimes at a lower price. And farmers can sell without a middleman getting a cut.

Now, some markets now run through the entire winter. As part of a collaboration of Northeast stations WNPR’s Nancy Cohen reports the number of winter-long markets have doubled, tripled... even quadrupled in some states.

A census on domestic violence services offered in Connecticut shows the need for them has grown in the last year.  

Jeff Cohen/WNPR

courtesy Larry Berk

“Buy local” has become a rallying cry for small businesses attempting to revive the high street. But it’s also a good message for those small businesses whose customers are big business. Plenty of small suppliers in Connecticut would like to see big corporations and state government look first in their own backyard when they spend money.

For the latest of WNPR’s small business profiles, business reporter Harriet Jones met with one such small supplier. 

DEP Asks Public to Report Odd Bat Behavior

Jan 21, 2011
CT Department of Environmental Protection

Five years ago this winter, a caver in New York photographed bats with a white fungus on their faces -- and found a few dead bats. Since then, more than one million bats have died in at least 12 states, including Connecticut, from a condition now known as “white nose” syndrome. Connecticut’s environmental agency is asking the public to keep an eye out for odd behavior in bats.

Zugaldia photo via Flickr Creative Commons

Tony Bagels and Vinnie Carwash.

Why is Enfield constantly the battleground for First Amendment issues? (Remember this was the town that gave us the graduation-in-a-church case.)

A state court judge said she would not immediately rule on the lawsuit brought by Republican Martha Dean that tries to disqualify Democrat George Jepsen from the race for attorney general. Dean filed suit earlier this week claiming that Jepsen didn’t have the required legal experience to serve as attorney general.

Credit Greg Verdino/Flickr Creative Commons

It’s commencement weekend for many colleges and universities in Connecticut. Among them is Wesleyan University in Middletown, where there’s been a lot of talk this year about a subject that’s often buried in a culture of silence: campus sexual assault.

In the first of a series of stories on the issue, WNPR’s Diane Orson reports on how the university judicial process handled the case of a 2010 graduating senior named Eve, who’s asked that we not use her last name.

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