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Connecticut legislature

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Executives and labor leaders at a group of skilled nursing homes in Connecticut that are set to lose Medicaid funding plan to challenge the state’s decision — they said otherwise, their nursing homes face severe financial cuts. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Lawmakers and members of the public listened at a forum in Hartford on Tuesday, as more details emerged regarding alleged mismanagement inside a quasi-public state agency. The Connecticut General Assembly’s Transportation Committee hosted the public hearing in order to learn more about the corporate structure of the Connecticut Port Authority.

New Report Shows Recreational Marijuana Revenue Volatile In Many States

Aug 19, 2019
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

While Connecticut opted not to legalize and tax recreational marijuana sales this year, many lawmakers saw the pot market as a cash cow that could rake in tens of millions of dollars annually for the state’s coffers.

But a new analysis by Pew Charitable Trusts found that states with legalized pot sales are struggling to predict how much they can haul in on an annual basis. 

CPA

The Secretary of the State’s office is defending Deputy Secretary Scott Bates as evidence grows about his role in questionable decisions at the Connecticut Port Authority.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Marion Bradley always knew that getting breast cancer was a possibility. After all, she had a family history of the disease, so she wasn’t shocked when she was diagnosed with an early stage of the cancer about five years ago.

But that didn’t make it any less scary.

Jade Allen / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut’s dairy farmers are ending their fifth year of financial decline and there does not seem to be an end in sight. That was the picture being presented to the legislative rural caucus on Tuesday as dairy farmers from across the state expressed the industry’s need for more financial support.

Tong: State Officials In Dalio Partnership Must Share Public Records

Aug 7, 2019
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A new opinion from Attorney General William Tong could lead to much greater transparency for the public-private partnership investing millions of dollars in Connecticut’s struggling schools. 

Puerto Rican evacuee Rita Rivera addressed reporters inside the Catholic Charities, Institute For The Hispanic Family in Hartford Tuesday July 30, 2019 about problems evacuees face nearly two years after Hurricane Maria leveled Puerto Rico.
Jade Allen / Connecticut Public Radio

Money that almost went back to the state is now in the hands of survivors of Hurricane Maria.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

For more than six years, Connecticut legislators and advocates have been trying to pass legislation that expands workers compensation benefits for first responders, particularly for those who develop job-related post-traumatic stress.

And when they finally succeeded this year and Gov. Ned Lamont signed a bill into law earlier this month, advocates and workers cheered in victory. But for emergency medical service professionals, who are not included in the new law, it was a different story.

Kwasi Kyei / Wikimedia Commons

For some single adults and couples, the path to adoption can be winding and difficult. This hour, we take an in-depth look at the realities of open adoption in the U.S.

We also learn about legislative efforts to improve adoptees' access to birth records in Connecticut. And we want to hear from you. Have you adopted, or were you adopted yourself? 

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

Hemp production. It's a growing field in Connecticut... and we mean that in the most literal sense. This hour, we learn about the state's newly seeded hemp industry and consider the challenges and opportunities of farming the plant on local land. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Lawmakers will meet up in Hartford Monday to discuss bills vetoed by Governor Ned Lamont. Lamont recently vetoed three bills. One – an act requiring a study of workforce training needs in the state – includes a proposal related to wages for restaurant wait staff.

Lamont Would Ease 'Debt Diet' In Final Push For Tolls

Jul 15, 2019
Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

Gov. Ned Lamont is making a final push to salvage tolls this year and its success could hinge on the limit he and lawmakers set on Connecticut’s credit card.

The governor is asking fellow Democrats to consider a scaled-back proposal that would place tolls only in strategic locations — such as aging bridges. 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Gov. Ned Lamont is in search of a new look for his State Capitol office, and we're not just talking about the grasscloth wallpaper and new carpeting he wants to install.

Staff changes also are in the works, including a new spokesman, NBC Connecticut political reporter Max Reiss.

They Love Public Financing. The Oversight, Not As Much.

Jul 3, 2019
Michelle Lee / Creative Commons

Tense for years, the General Assembly’s relationship with the State Elections Enforcement Commission is now so toxic that clean-election advocates speak wistfully about staging an intervention, finding some way to break a cycle of recrimination they say undermines campaign-finance reforms Connecticut adopted in 2005 to national acclaim. 

Lamont: Conn Will Get Extra Income Tax Receipts Built Into New Budget

Jun 25, 2019
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Gov. Ned Lamont and his budget director defended their decision Tuesday to build $180 million in extra income tax receipts into the new state budget, with Lamont offering assurances the money will flow as planned into the state’s coffers. 

Jade Allen / Connecticut Public Radio

Governor Ned Lamont has signed into law a bill that will provide paid family and medical leave for up to 12 weeks for all Connecticut employees. The program will be funded through a payroll tax on workers.

U.S. Air Force

"Will America Attack Iran Over One Dead Robot?" That is the question a Daily Beast headline asks in the wake of Iran downing an unmanned U.S. drone in the Gulf. This hour, we get the latest on this evolving story from reporter Adam Rawnsley and consider what it all means for the future of U.S.-Iran relations. 

Seth Wenig / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Democratic lawmakers are getting ready to take on child vaccination legislation in the next session, which won’t start until January or February.

An Unenthusiastic Response To Lamont's Tolls Reboot

Jun 19, 2019
Washington State Dept. of Transportation/flickr creative commons

The administration of Gov. Ned Lamont re-launched its campaign for highway tolls in a private two-pronged pitch to wary legislative leaders Wednesday, setting Connecticut’s growing transportation infrastructure needs against a special transportation fund on the verge of insolvency. 

Keith Allison / Creative Commons

In a tweet earlier this week, President Trump wrote that Immigration and Customs Enforcement will soon begin deporting millions of undocumented citizens.

Sam Smith, 21, of New Haven, supports a state bill that would allow teens to get PrEP, an HIV prevention medication, without parental consent. This way, he said people won't have to choose between their health and the privacy of their sexual activities.
Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

It was during his freshman year of high school when Sam Smith approached his doctor — he had been exploring his sexuality for a couple years.

“I was like, hey, I’m having sex with guys,” he said, recounting the doctor’s visit. “What do I do?”

Smith hoped that his doctor would suggest pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, which is a daily pill that can prevent someone from contracting the HIV virus if they’re exposed to it.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

If large corporations, like United Technologies, are increasingly eyeing urban hubs for future growth, what are we doing to put our cities at the cusp of that trend? Or more likely, what aren't we doing as a state?

This week, we take stock of what cities such as Hartford, New Haven, and Bridgeport have to offer CEOs looking to relocate their companies, and where they fall short. 

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Democratic legislators and government officials stood with a small crowd of supporters at the Legislative Office Building in March to announce that it was time that Connecticut created a public option health insurance program. 

Harriet Jones / WNPR

Last fall, after United Technologies Corp. announced it would spin off its Otis Elevator and Carrier divisions, then Governor-elect Ned Lamont vowed he would watch the Farmington-based conglomerate "like a hawk" to retain its workforce in Connecticut.

But this weekend's news that UTC would merge with Raytheon Co., and move its headquarters to Waltham, MA., came with little advanced notice to the Lamont administration.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Among the big-ticket items that did not pass in Connecticut's 2019 legislative session were tolls and legal cannabis. While tolls will likely be debated in a special session this summer, proponents of recreational marijuana will have to regroup and wait until next year.

The nation's first off-shore wind farm off the coast of Block Island, Rhode Island in October 2016.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

This hour we take a look at some of the environmental bills the Connecticut General Assembly passed this legislative session, including a new commitment to offshore wind power. We learn what this renewable energy source means for the state’s power grid—and its economy.

And we take a look at one essential component behind offshore wind power, a group of special metals called “rare earth elements”. What does the availability—and environmental impact—of harvesting these materials mean for our energy future?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

With Connecticut's legislative session now over, there were a few bills passed that impact education issues in the state, and some that didn’t make it through.

Lamont: We'll Revisit Public Option Health Care Issue Next Year

Jun 6, 2019
Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Gov. Ned Lamont said Thursday that efforts to push through a revised public option health care bill came “too late” in the legislative session, and he pledged to revive the issue next year. 

Connecticut State Capitol / Wikimedia Commons

At midnight, the Connecticut General Assembly ended its regular session on time--and with a new two-year budget.

This hour, we look at what lawmakers accomplished and what’s still left on the table. Mark Pazniokas, Capitol Bureau Chief for the Connecticut Mirror, will join us with more.

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