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Nearly 30 million trips are made every day using public transit, mostly in the nation’s 100 largest metropolitan areas.  And the main destination of these millions of commuters is, not surprisingly, work.  So a new Brookings report surveyed public transit in 100 cities in the U.S. including Bridgeport, New Haven and Hartford, to see just how effective public transit is in getting people to their jobs every day.

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May is “Preservation Month” in Connecticut - and preservationists just celebrated a six-year milestone.

The wide-ranging Community Investment Act was signed into state law in 2005.  It increases investment in the areas that preservationists have shown the most concern about - open space, farmland preservation, historic preservation and affordable housing.

Harriet Jones

Governor Malloy has declared the state of Connecticut open for business. But many small businesses find when they come in contact with state government, their first experience is frustration. WNPR’s Harriet Jones looks at just how well the state is doing in streamlining its approach to business.

This is Larry’s Auto Power in Groton, and that’s a race car engine on the test block.

“We do street performance engine rebuilding, racecar engine building.”

Morning Edition: Community Investment Act

Apr 19, 2011

Six years ago the Community Investment Act was signed into law to preserve and protect the places that are important to Connecticut's identity and character, while also creating more affordable housing and offering municipalities help for capitol improvement projects. Now the Community Investment Act is touting it's successes since 2005 with a press conference today, and an exhibit at the State Capitol. Joining us by phone is Senate President Donald Williams who originated the law.

Learn more about the Community Investment Act 

Chion Wolf Photo

An East Granby woman was close to losing her home after falling behind on mortgage payments while she was unemployed.

Joan Wright-Lee found a new job but needed to raise $6000 to keep her home.
That's when her friends stepped in and created a website soliciting donations online. And through the power of Facebook, her story has been shared around the Internet thanks to her Facebook friends who posted her website address on their profile walls.

Wright-Lee spoke to WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil about this unconventional way to avoid foreclosure.

Many in New Haven are still reeling from last week's tragic shooting death  of 23 year old Mitchell Dubey. Last Thursday in an attempted robbery, a masked gunman entered Dubey's house, and ordered he and his roommates to sit down. After shooting Dubey in the chest, the gunman fled. Now one of those roommates, Andy Tabar is organizing a big music show this Sunday night at Toad's place in New Haven to raise money for the Dubey family. Andy Tabar joins us by phone.

Advocates for Latinos will gather in Hartford on Wednesday to talk with lawmakers about issues affecting the state’s Hispanic community. As WNPR's Diane Orson reports, 2010 census figures show a big jump in Connecticut’s Latino population.   

The number of Hispanics in Connecticut increased nearly 50 percent in the last decade. State Representative Andres Ayala:

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"Street newspapers" are designed, written and sold by the homeless. They are small, usually no more than a few pages, and feature articles, photographs and poetry about what it's like to live in shelters or on the street. They're easy to find in cities like Portland, Oregon or Providence and as WNPR's Patrick Skahill reports, now Hartford has its own street newspaper.

Harriet Jones

Tourism is vital industry for Connecticut, generating some $14 billion in visitor spending each year. Small businesses are the mainstay of the sector. But as WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports, many are worried about the future.

Governor Dannel Malloy says he gets it on tourism.

“We’re going to rethink in its entirety our approach to tourism—we’re going to work where partnerships work and we’re not going to carry partnerships that don’t work.”

Harriet Jones

If Connecticut is to have an engaged and productive workforce it must have reliable childcare. Childcare comes in many different forms, but an increasing number of providers are small, home-based businesses. WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports.

In a tiny condo in Hamden, Lushanna Thompson is allowing her small charges to let off some steam.

Cash is the lifeblood of any small business, and access to financing can be a critical factor in whether a small enterprise can grow and thrive. Businesses need credit to hire and to make capital investments. It may sometimes seem as if the chips are stacked against them.

For 17 years, Joe Petti ran a small manufacturing firm, Delaney Engineering in Milford. He says one of the biggest issues he faced growing his company was dealing with the banks.

A startling investigation of what people do in disasters and why it matters.  Why is it that in the aftermath of a disaster — whether manmade or natural—people suddenly become altruistic, resourceful, and brave? What makes the newfound communities and purpose many find
in the ruins and crises after disaster so joyous? And what does this joy reveal about ordinarily unmet social desires and possibilities?

Harriet Jones

WNPR’s Small Business Project is in Waterbury this week. 

A special edition of Where We Live this Wednesday will come live from the Palace Theater in downtown Waterbury. 

The Brass City has seen its share of hard times and economic upheaval, but revitalization efforts, many led by small business, are underway. 

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