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When asked if he could imagine a college party where everyone is wearing masks, Jacques du Passage, a sophomore at Louisiana State University, laughs.

"No. I don't think they would do that," he says. "I think [students] would just have the party and then face the repercussions."

That's exactly what Apramay Mishra, student body president at the University of Kansas, is worried about when it comes to reopening campus amid the pandemic. "Right now it's kind of slipped from most people's minds," he says. Students "don't really think it's a big deal."

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Faced with a massive deficit -- only exacerbated by the economic pain of coronavirus shutdowns -- the University of Connecticut’s athletics department is making cuts.

John Billingsley / Vermont Public Radio

COVID-19 has driven New England’s higher education sector into financial "survival mode." Now colleges and universities must adapt or risk major — if not catastrophic — loss from the crisis.

Join us for an America Amplified special from the New England News Collaborative. We'll bring together voices from across the region, and we want to hear yours.

U.S. Coast Guard Academy (screengrab)

The uncertainty of coronavirus forced the U.S. Coast Guard Academy to do something it’s never done -- commission officers virtually.

Kenneth C. Zirkel

As the school year winds down for students, universities and colleges across the state are starting to make a plan for the fall semester. This hour, we’re talking to college faculty and students about what their online learning experience has been like so far, and what their hopes are for the next academic year. How are universities preparing for an outbreak on campus? College isn’t just academics; what will collegiate sports and student organizations look like in the 20-21 academic year? 

We want to hear from you. Are you a student or a faculty member at a Connecticut college or university ? How will your school hold classes during the next academic year? 

 The Yale campus is quiet on March 11, 2020, as the school is on spring break. The university plans to shift classes online after the break ends to curb the spread of COVID-19.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

As college campuses across the country grapple with potential outbreaks of the coronavirus, Yale University has told students to not come back after spring break -- but that decision was made after spring break started, leaving many students in limbo.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Jim Calhoun’s University of Saint Joseph men’s basketball team played its first NCAA Division III Tournament game Friday, 16 months after the Blue Jays had their first game.

ncaa saint jospeh student athletes
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The Jim Calhoun-led men’s basketball team from the University of Saint Joseph has made it to the NCAA Division III Tournament for the first time. The program is only 2 years old.

Updated at 4:37p.m. EST.

The U.S. Department of Education says it is opening an investigation into Yale and Harvard universities for failing to disclose hundreds of millions of dollars in gifts and contracts from foreign donors.

The two Ivy League schools have been singled out in a federal crackdown on institutions of higher learning for allegedly not reporting foreign donations of more than $250,000, as required by law under Section 117 of the Higher Education Act.

Russ / CreativeCommons.org

Standardized tests, application forms, campus visits. The path to college can be a daunting one, especially when you add tuition to the mix. Then, of course, there is the cost of room and board, meal plans, textbooks...feeling stressed yet?

This hour, we tackle the realities of affording a college education, and we also hear from you. Are you the parent of a college-age student? Are you, yourself, working toward a college degree? How has this impacted you financially...emotionally? 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Wanjiku Gatheru is the daughter of Kenyan immigrants and a first-generation American. Now, the UConn senior has made university history as the school’s first-ever Rhodes Scholar.

A few years ago, Lauren had a big problem. The Queens, N.Y., resident had graduated from college with an art degree as the Great Recession had hit. She had private student loans with high interest rates. For work, all she could find were retail jobs. And by 2016, her loans had ballooned to about $200,000.

" 'I can't afford to actually pay my bills and eat and pay my rent,' " she remembers thinking. "I was financially handicapped. I mean, my student loan payments were higher than my rent was."

WFSB

The body of a University of Connecticut student has been recovered by campus police.

Pixabay.com

More than 4 million people, around 1 out of 5 undergrads, are raising children today. That’s according to the U.S. Department of Education. These student parents tend to have higher GPAs than traditional students. They’re often older, single, and women of color. But more than half of them leave school without getting a degree. 

Russ / Creative Commons

Mental health professionals on college campuses say more students year over year are seeking services for new and ongoing mental health and substance use issues. They say it’s not a bad thing that students are being proactive about their mental health -- but resources are strained. 

rashida s. mar b. / Flickr Creative Commons

The stereotypes around homeschooling have existed for decades. Since the modern homeschooling movement began in the late 20th century, those who favored this educational approach have largely been perceived as white, anti-establishment, radically Christian, and ultra-conservative.

This fall, there were nearly 250,000 fewer students enrolled in college than a year ago, according to new numbers out Monday from the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, which tracks college enrollment by student.

"That's a lot of students that we're losing," says Doug Shapiro, who leads the research center at the Clearinghouse.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

It’s been seven years since a shooter killed 20 children and six adults at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown. On Friday, a community drive was held in New Britain -- turning the time marking the tragedy into a day of giving.

Wokandapix / Pixabay

As college students wrap up their fall semester, there is an expectation their professors are tenured. But three out of four faculty today aren’t eligible for tenure. And many are adjuncts, part-time faculty without strong benefits or job security.

What’s the human cost to this model of education? We find out and we want to hear from you.

Sean Flynn / UConn Photo

The University of Connecticut has its first Rhodes scholar.

Wanjiku Gatheru, an environmental studies major from Pomfret, is one of 32 people who will study free of charge at England’s Oxford University for at least two years.

Phil Roeder / Creative Commons

Defense Secretary Mark Esper demanded the resignation of Navy Secretary Richard Spencer on Sunday. Esper said he had lost confidence in Spencer. Esper's action follows Spencer publicly disagreeing with President Trump over the military's decision to demote one of three war criminals the president pardoned against military advice. What are the consequences of presidential interference in the military code of justice?

Brace Hemmelgarn / Minnesota Twins

Ryan Costello, a baseball prospect from Wethersfield who played for a minor league team affiliated with the Minnesota Twins, has died. He was 23.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

On the day of the first public hearing of the U.S. House of Representatives' impeachment inquiry, students at Quinnipiac University in Hamden watched on a giant projector screen in the student center.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

About 800,000 young undocumented immigrants have benefited from the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, since its inception in 2012, but now many of them are living and going to school in the U.S. with their status in doubt.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The University of Connecticut is moving forward with a series of initiatives to help the Storrs campus heal after a racist incident that drew outrage from many students.

Earlier this week, two white UConn students were arrested after they were identified on a viral video shouting racial slurs as they walked through the parking lot of Charter Oak apartments, an on-campus residence hall.

During a meeting of the UConn Board of Trustees Wednesday, University President Thomas Katsouleas said the incident has affected the student body.

Jacquelyn Martin / AP Photo

There’s been a jump in the number of people who support the impeachment of President Donald Trump, according to the latest Quinnipiac University national poll.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Police arrested two University of Connecticut students Monday after a video posted to social media showed students shouting racial slurs outside of a campus residence hall.

Miguel Cardona
Courtesy: NEAG School of Education, UConn

At 27, he was a Connecticut school principal. At 44, he is the state’s commissioner of education.

This hour, Dr. Miguel Cardona joins us to talk about his vision for Connecticut's education future. 

Starting early last year, the nation's most powerful consumer protection agency sent examiners into companies that run student loan call centers to try to fix a troubled loan forgiveness program. But the Department of Education blocked the bureau from getting the information it needed, NPR has learned.

The Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program is designed to help firefighters, military service members, nonprofit workers and others. But thousands of people say they were treated unfairly and rejected.

Yale University has made a significant investment in New Haven, helping to turn the city around over the last 30 years.
Courtesy Yale University

New Haven was stumbling and struggling in the 1980s and early 1990s. Downtown was moribund, litter-strewn and dangerous — a Yale student (among others) was killed on the street in 1991.

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